Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Community Composting Done Right: A Guide to Best Management Practices

280 views

Published on

6th National Cultivating Community Composting Forum
Panel 5: BMPs and Rodent Control
Linda Bilsens Brolis
Institute for Local Self-Reliance
Washington, D.C.

Published in: Environment
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Community Composting Done Right: A Guide to Best Management Practices

  1. 1. Linda Bilsens Brolis Project Manager, Composting for Community Initiative Institute for Local Self-Reliance 6th National Cultivating Community Composting Forum May 14th, 2019 Community Composting Done Right: A Guide to Best Management Practices
  2. 2. Report Overview Part 1: For New Composters and New Sites Part 2: The Science and Art of Composting Part 3: Managing the Composting Process and Your Site Appendices: • Glossary of Terms • Troubleshooting FAQ • Troubleshooting Table • Sample Monitoring Data Sheet • Community Composting in GA
  3. 3. Source: L. Bilsens Brolis, B. Platt, Community Composting Done Right: A Guide to Best Management Practices, Institute for Local Self-Reliance, 2019 (www.ilsr.org/composting-bmp-guide). Reprinted with permission.
  4. 4. Why BMPs for Community-Scale? To ensure public safety To prevent public nuisances (real or perceived) To maximize benefits Community-scale is: • Generally exempt or altogether absent from permitting requirements • Often managed by volunteers • GREAT for educating the public about composting…but not if mismanaged The Institute for Local Self-Reliance and ECO City Farms launched the Neighborhood Soil Rebuilders Composter Training Program in 2014. NSR lead instructor, Benny Erez, third from right. Source: Institute for Local Self-Reliance.
  5. 5. How do BMPs change… Based on: Scale? Level of volunteer involvement? Location? What you compost? • Types • Sources End use?
  6. 6. Key Best Management Practices (BMPs) Identifying your team and a management plan Selecting and laying out the site Developing your composting recipe Building and maintaining your compost pile Monitoring and keeping records Finishing the composting process & testing Health and safety considerations BK Rot in Brooklyn, started by Sandy Nurse and Renee Peperone in 2013, pays a living wage to local youth who manage the bike-powered food scrap collection and composting enterprise. Source: Valery Rizzo.
  7. 7. Source: L. Bilsens Brolis, B. Platt, Community Composting Done Right: A Guide to Best Management Practices, Institute for Local Self-Reliance, 2019 (www.ilsr.org/composting-bmp-guide). Reprinted with permission.
  8. 8. Source: L. Bilsens Brolis, B. Platt, Community Composting Done Right: A Guide to Best Management Practices, Institute for Local Self-Reliance, 2019 (www.ilsr.org/composting-bmp-guide). Reprinted with permission.
  9. 9. Before You Begin Clarify your composting • goals • team • method Training matters! The DC Department of Parks and Recreation’s Community Compost Cooperative Network requires at least one active manager at each of its 50+ sites. The cooperative at Howard University pictured here. Source: Loop Closing.
  10. 10. Source: L. Bilsens Brolis, B. Platt, Community Composting Done Right: A Guide to Best Management Practices, Institute for Local Self-Reliance, 2019 (www.ilsr.org/composting-bmp-guide). Reprinted with permission.
  11. 11. Site Layout: Set yourself up for success! You need space:  To compost  To store browns (carbon source & bulking materials)  To store temperature probe, scale, recording binder  To cure  To screen  To store finished compost  To handle water  To move around  To breathe The layout of a composting site should allow for a logical and efficient flow of materials and people, while minimizing the potential for contamination of more stable materials. Adapted from Oregon State University, Agricultural Composting and Water Quality (2013).
  12. 12. Source: L. Bilsens Brolis, B. Platt, Community Composting Done Right: A Guide to Best Management Practices, Institute for Local Self-Reliance, 2019 (www.ilsr.org/composting-bmp-guide). Reprinted with permission.
  13. 13. Determine Your Compost Recipe Method 1: 3 parts browns to 1 part greens
  14. 14. The Science & Art of Composting Source: Adapted from Benny Erez, “The Composting Process”, Neighborhood Soil Rebuilders Composter Training Program. Jesse Williams of Rust Belt Riders unloads food scraps collected in the Cleveland area. Source: Jacob Koestler.
  15. 15. The Science & Art of Composting Building your composting pile A cross-section of a well-built composting pile. Source: Institute for Local Self-Reliance The NYC Compost Project hosted by Earth Matter NY is located on Governors Island and composts food scraps from the broader NYC community. Source: Earth Matter.
  16. 16. Monitoring & Keeping Records Temperature Aeration & odors Moisture Pests BK ROT in Brooklyn uses a simple data log to track temperatures and other observations and actions. Sources: Institute for Local Self-Reliance, BK ROT. Community Composting Done Right: A Guide to Best Management Practices, Appendix D. Available for download at https://ilsr.org/composting-bmp-guide/.
  17. 17. Managing the Composting Process & Your Site Health & safety considerations Red Hook Community Farm has designated tools for composting that are labeled and stored separately from gardening tools. Source: Institute for Local Self-Reliance.
  18. 18. Managing the Composting Process & Your Site Turning or remixing Monitoring & keeping records Managing Problems
  19. 19. Compost Testing Field Tests: • “Ziplock” test • Solvita for maturity • Seed germination bioassay for phytotoxins • Electrical conductivity for soluble salt content • pH Lab Tests: • Nutrient content • Organic matter • Trace metals • Pathogens Neighborhood Soil Rebuilders Composter Training Program

×