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Truly an international English translation
serving the global church and world
Christianity.
The NIV was envisioned to provide an
alternative translation to the nearly
500-year-old King James Version (KJV), which
in...
In 1965, the NIV translation project was initiated by the signing of the
NIV charter and the formation of the Committee on...
The CBT began the
translation process for the NIV
in 1965, working from the
original Greek, Hebrew and
Aramaic texts.
to t...
Since its release in 1978, the NIV has become the world’s best-selling Bible translation with
more than 450 million copies...
The release of the NIV in 1978 did not mean the
work of the CBT was complete.
The NIV charter calls for the CBT to meet
an...
Highlight with
to the right.
IMAGE
The 2011 NIV update represents the
CBT’s latest effort as a committee to
articulate God...
Changes to the text are not made easily.
to the right.
During the translation update process,
members of the committee wor...
With callout
1 2
For the 2011 update, the CBT initiated a relationship with Collins Dictionaries to use the Collins Bank o...
At least 95 percent of the text of the 2011 NIV remains
exactly the same as the 1984 NIV it replaced.
All the changes in t...
“When God spoke through the text of the Bible, he said exactly what he
wanted to say in the language of everyday people. T...
With callout
1
How has the NIV been rigorously cultivated and nurtured?
The New International Version of
the Bible continu...
With callout
1
How are gender related issues handled?
Nowhere in the NIV is there even the remotest hint of any inclusive ...
With callout
1
Are there verses missing from the NIV translation?
Most of these manuscripts were not located until after t...
Today’s Committee on Bible Translation
Douglas J. Moo is Blanchard Professor of New
Testament at Wheaton College, where he...
Today’s Committee on Bible Translation
Rev. Dr. David Instone-Brewer, a British
Baptist minister, was educated in Cambridg...
Today’s Committee on Bible Translation
Bill Mounce specializes in the Greek language
and has written a number of Greek lan...
Today’s Committee on Bible Translation
Dr. Bruce Waltke is Emeritus Professor of Old
Testament Studies at Regent College, ...
1 3
Biblica is the worldwide translation
sponsor of the NIV. For over 200
years, Biblica has been reaching
people with God...
With calloutEndorsements
"The New International Version follows in the same tradition as
the King James Version, although ...
With callout
to the right. — Rev. Randy Frazee, Senior Minister of Oak Hills Church, San Antonio, TX
— Tremper Longman III...
Visit TheNIVBible.com
for more free resources
FREE NIV Bible App
FREE NIV translation app allows you to
stream the complet...
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The NIV Bible - Making God’s Word accessible to today’s generation of Christians and seekers

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Since its release in 1978, the NIV has become the world’s best-selling Bible translation with more than 450 million copies in print worldwide. Learn more about how this translation came to be. The NIV is the translation of choice for millions of people around the world who want to read and understand Scripture in today’s language. It has made God’s Word accessible to today’s generation of Christians and seekers alike.

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The NIV Bible - Making God’s Word accessible to today’s generation of Christians and seekers

  1. 1. Truly an international English translation serving the global church and world Christianity.
  2. 2. The NIV was envisioned to provide an alternative translation to the nearly 500-year-old King James Version (KJV), which in 1960’s America, many found challenging to read and understand due to the changes that had occurred in language usage over the previous five centuries --“thou art” and “ye shall” was no longer how people talked. The original vision for the New International Version (NIV) of the Bible arose out of a desire to create a Bible translation written in modern English that could be easily read and understood, making God’s Word accessible to present and future generations. Hear the Word the way it was written Understand the Word the way it was meant The NIV distinctive:
  3. 3. In 1965, the NIV translation project was initiated by the signing of the NIV charter and the formation of the Committee on Bible Translation (CBT). The CBT was formed to create a modern English Bible translation from the oldest and most reliable biblical manuscripts available, providing the best possible blend of transparency to the original documents and ease of understanding in every verse. The CBT is accountable for honoring the NIV charter and meets annually to monitor developments in biblical scholarship and English usage and to reflect these developments in periodic updates to the text. The CBT represents the very best in evangelical biblical scholarship. The members – a self-perpetuating, independent body of 15 – are drawn from various denominations and some of the finest academic institutions in the world. Formation of the Committee on Bible Translation
  4. 4. The CBT began the translation process for the NIV in 1965, working from the original Greek, Hebrew and Aramaic texts. to the right. Every verse was discussed and debated to ensure it was being translated to achieve the optimum combination of transparency to the original documents and ease of understanding. Their translation work took more than 10 years and in 1975, the New Testament of the NIV was released and in 1978 the entire Bible was completed and published. 1965 1966 1975 1978 Translation process begins 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 Entire Bible published 1976 1977 New Testament published
  5. 5. Since its release in 1978, the NIV has become the world’s best-selling Bible translation with more than 450 million copies in print worldwide. Today, the NIV is available globally in a variety of formats, for children and adults through all stages of life. The NIV is also used as a reference text, helping in the translation of many languages around the world. The most popular NIV Bible is the NIV Study Bible. The NIV is the translation of choice for millions of people around the world who want to read and understand Scripture in today’s language. It has made God’s Word accessible to today’s generation of Christians and seekers alike. The NIV was quickly embraced by millions of readers who were grateful to have a Bible they could easily understand.
  6. 6. The release of the NIV in 1978 did not mean the work of the CBT was complete. The NIV charter calls for the CBT to meet annually and conduct regular monitoring of developments in biblical scholarship and English usage. The reflection of these developments in periodic updates to the text ensures that the NIV translation continues to offer readers an experience that mirrors that of the original audience. Updated versions of the NIV were released in 1984 2011
  7. 7. Highlight with to the right. IMAGE The 2011 NIV update represents the CBT’s latest effort as a committee to articulate God’s unchanging Word in the way the original authors might have said it if they had been speaking in English to the English-speaking audience today. The chief goal of every update to the NIV is to ensure that the text reflects the latest and best biblical scholarship and established shifts in English idiom and usage. This is the reading experience that the NIV seeks to recreate.
  8. 8. Changes to the text are not made easily. to the right. During the translation update process, members of the committee work individually – each in their own particular areas of specialty – as well as in small groups and as a full committee. In addition to considering proposals from within the committee, the CBT also solicits and receives input from Bible scholars, ministers, missionaries and lay-people. Every proposal is evaluated with many leading to revisions to the text, while others are tabled for discussion at future meetings for potential inclusion in later updates. At least 70 percent of the committee members present at the time of the voting are required to agree before the text can be altered. This ensures that no individual, indeed not even a large group of individuals, can hold sway in the committee.
  9. 9. With callout 1 2 For the 2011 update, the CBT initiated a relationship with Collins Dictionaries to use the Collins Bank of English, one of the world’s foremost English language research tools. The database of more than 4.4 billion English words provides objective, statistically significant data on the state of written and spoken English at any given point in the history of the language. Working with some of the world’s leading experts in computational linguistics and using cutting-edge techniques developed specifically for the updated NIV, the CBT gained an unprecedented and authoritative perspective on contemporary linguistic norms.
  10. 10. At least 95 percent of the text of the 2011 NIV remains exactly the same as the 1984 NIV it replaced. All the changes in the updated text are attributable to one – and in some cases, to more than one – of the following reasons: changes in English progress in scholarship concern for clarity Progress in Scholarship “[Christ Jesus] Who, being in very nature God, did not consider equality with God something to be grasped” “[Christ Jesus] Who, being in very nature God, did not consider equality with God something to be used to his own advantage” NIV 1984 Updated NIV NIV 1984 Updated NIV “I am a foreigner and stranger among you . . . ” Concern for Clarity NIV 1984 Updated NIV “If only there were someone to arbitrate between us, to lay his hand upon us both.” “If only there were someone to mediate between us, someone to bring us together.” 95% remains the same Changes in English “I am an alien and a stranger among you . . . ”
  11. 11. “When God spoke through the text of the Bible, he said exactly what he wanted to say in the language of everyday people. Two thousand years later, we have sought to give the world a Bible translation that reflects those same priorities: Hear God’s Word the way it was written and understand it the way it was meant! Take it, read it, listen to it, pray over it, enjoy it and use it to grow in Christian maturity!” — The Committee on Bible Translation, August, 2010
  12. 12. With callout 1 How has the NIV been rigorously cultivated and nurtured? The New International Version of the Bible continues to honor its charter from the evangelical community. The ministry of the NIV will continue to flourish because of the faithful, ongoing work of the Committee on Bible Translation. The only entity that can influence the text itself is the Committee on Bible Translation. Every update is a matter of integrity for the CBT who is solely responsible for every “jot and tittle” of the NIV text. Given the CBT’s commitment to rigorous attention to the original languages (What does the text mean?) and the targeted contemporary English language (How can we render that meaning so it is best understood as intended?), periodic updates are necessary. So based on the original charter and commitment of the CBT, the latest edition of the NIV reflects the most accurate and most readable text. The only thing that drives the Committee on Bible Translation is their charter and philosophy of equal rigor to both the original languages and the target, contemporary English language. True to its charter, the CBT has met faithfully every year since it was formed in 1965 and has produced several revisions when they discerned it was necessary in order to maintain the integrity of the text.
  13. 13. With callout 1 How are gender related issues handled? Nowhere in the NIV is there even the remotest hint of any inclusive language for God. The revisions solely surround inclusive language for mankind. “Man” (“men”) Avoid it when the text is inclusive (referring to a person, or people, of indeterminate or mixed gender) Rom. 3:28: “a person is justified by faith apart from the works of the law” Use it when the text is exclusive Mark 9:41: “The Son of Man is going to be delivered into the hands of men.” “He” (“him,” “his,” “himself”) Usually avoid it when the text is inclusive Instead of “he,” we prefer to use distributive “they” Mark 8:36: “What good is it for someone to gain the whole world, yet forfeit their soul?” Why? Because it is how people are actually speaking and writing! —The Collins Report The mandate under the NIV charter is to maintain the NIV as an articulation of God’s unchanging Word in contemporary English. To the extent that gender-inclusive language is an established part of contemporary English and that its use enhances comprehension for readers, it clearly was an important factor in the decisions made.
  14. 14. With callout 1 Are there verses missing from the NIV translation? Most of these manuscripts were not located until after the King James Version of the Bible published in 1611 was first translated. When those verses could not be verified by the more reliable or older manuscripts, the NIV translators moved them to a footnote to reflect greater accuracy. People who grew up with the King James Version might feel that something has been taken out. The real question is not why these verses were left out, but more of who added them later. Check the footnotes of your NIV Bible on the page where there is a verse “missing”. It is likely the verse you seek is printed in these notes. During the New International Version translation process some verses were found not to be included in the oldest or more reliable manuscripts the NIV translators had available to use. The real question is not why verses were left out, but more of who added them later. The reason some verses appear with a footnote and others in a footnote is based on whether or not the verse in question comes from the original text. If the scholars were more certain that the verse was not in the original text, the verse is placed in the footnote. If the scholars were less certain, the verse was placed within the text with an explanatory footnote added. It was all done to achieve maximum accuracy and readability.
  15. 15. Today’s Committee on Bible Translation Douglas J. Moo is Blanchard Professor of New Testament at Wheaton College, where he teaches and mentors students in the masters and doctoral programs. He is a graduate of Trinity Evangelical Divinity School (M.Div.) and the University of St. Andrews (Ph.D.). He was previously a faculty member at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School (1977-2000). He has written commentaries on several New Testament books (Romans, James, Colossians, and 2 Peter-Jude) and co-written a New Testament Introduction (with D. A. Carson). Dr. Moo has been a member of CBT since 1996. Dr. Craig Blomberg is Distinguished Professor of New Testament at Denver Seminary in Littleton, Colorado. He holds his PhD in New Testament from the University of Aberdeen, Scotland, and his MA from Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. He is the author of twelve books and has co-authored or co- edited seven more, along with dozens of journal articles and chapters in multi-author works. His books include three on the historical reliability and interpretation of the gospels (one on John), two on interpreting and preaching the parables, and three commentaries (on Matthew, 1 Corinthians and James). Dr. Blomberg has been a member of CBT since 2008. Dr. Jeannine Brown is Professor of New Testament at Bethel Seminary in St. Paul, Minnesota where she also completed her M.Div in 1991. She has a Ph.D. in New Testament from Luther Seminary. Dr. Brown has consulted to two major Bible translation projects (Common English Bible and New Century Version) and has published a large number of scholarly articles. In 2007 she published a major introduction to Biblical hermeneutics. She has also made contributions to three other published books including a section on Matthew’s gospel in The Evangelical One-Volume Commentary on the Bible (rev.). Dr. Brown joined CBT in 2009 Chairman Dr. Havilah Dharamraj is Academic Dean and Head of Old Testament Studies at South Asia Institute of Advanced Christian Studies. She has a Ph.D. from the University of Durham. Dr. Dharamraj spent several years teaching chemistry before taking up Old Testament studies. Today she teaches at the South Asia Institute of Advanced Christian Studies in Bangalore, India. She’s the author of A Prophet Like Moses? A Narrative-Theological Reading of the Elijah Stories.
  16. 16. Today’s Committee on Bible Translation Rev. Dr. David Instone-Brewer, a British Baptist minister, was educated in Cambridge (PhD) and Cardiff (BD). After a decade as a pastor in Wales, he now holds an academic post at Tyndale House, Cambridge. His two research specialties are the Jewish background of the New Testament and software for Biblical studies. He has written books on divorce and other New Testament teachings which are illuminated by ancient Jewish documents. Dr. Instone-Brewer has been on the CBT since 2005. Dr. Karen H. Jobes is the Gerald F. Hawthorne Professor of New Testament Greek and Exegesis at Wheaton College and Graduate School. She holds a PhD in Biblical Hermeneutics from Westminster Theological Seminary (Philadelphia). She has written commentaries on 1 Peter and Esther and an introduction to the Septuagint (with Moisés Silva). Dr. Jobes participates in various academic organizations to stay current in her field, but finds the most refreshment from her work through regular worship at Church. She has been a member of the CBT since 1996. Dr. Simon Gathercole is Senior Lecturer in New Testament Studies, University of Cambridge He holds a Ph.D. from University of Durham. Dr. Gathercole specializes in New Testament interpretation, as well as exploring the connections between the New Testament and other literature from the same historical period. In addition to his contribution to the Committee on Bible Translation, he serves as editor for the Journal for the Study of the New Testament. Dr. Richard Hess is the Earl S. Kallard Professor of Old Testament and Semitic Languages at Denver Seminary. He holds a Ph.D. in Hebrew at Union College. Dr. Hess has taught at Denver Seminary since 1997. He specializes in Hebrew grammar, as well as the study of ancient Near Eastern texts related to the Old Testament. In addition to his work on the NIV with the Committee on Bible Translation, Dr. Hess has contributed his expertise to four other translations: the English Standard Version (ESV), Holman Christian Standard Bible (HCSB), New American Bible (NAB), and Common English Bible (CEB).
  17. 17. Today’s Committee on Bible Translation Bill Mounce specializes in the Greek language and has written a number of Greek language textbooks, including the bestselling, Basics of Biblical Greek, and many other resources. He is a graduate of the University of Aberdeen (PhD) and Fuller Theological Seminary (MA). He is the Vice President of Content and Learning at Olive Tree Bible Software and the president of Biblical Training.org, a non-profit organization offering world-class educational resources for discipleship in the local church. Formerly he was a full-time Preaching Pastor, a professor of New Testament and Director of the Greek Language Program at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary, and a professor of New Testament at Azusa Pacific University. He served as the New Testament chair of the translation team for the English Standard Version of the Bible. Dr. Mounce joined the CBT in 2009. The Rev. Dr. Paul Swarup is a minister with the Church of North India in the Diocese of Delhi, presently pastoring at Christ Church, Noida. He holds a PhD in OT Theology/Dead Sea Scrolls from the University of Cambridge, UK. He is a visiting faculty at the Jesuit Seminary, Vidyajyoti College of Theology, Delhi and the Marthoma Seminary, Dharamjyoti Vidya Peet, Faridabad., Haryana. He was appointed to CBT in 2008. Mark L. Strauss has a Ph.D. in New Testament from the University of Aberdeen, Scotland, and is professor of New Testament at Bethel Seminary San Diego, where he has served for 15 years. Dr. Strauss is a frequent preacher at San Diego area churches and has served in three interim pastorates. He is the author of many books and articles and is a frequent speaker in churches and conferences. Dr. Strauss has served on the Committee for Bible Translation since 2005. Vice Chair Rev. Dr. Andrew G. Shead is Head of Old Testament Studies at Moore Theological College in Sydney. He holds a Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge. In over 20 years at Moore College, Dr. Shead has taught all three biblical languages and most books of the Old Testament. His research interests include the book of Jeremiah, textual criticism, Hebrew poetry, and biblical theology. Dr. Shead joined the Committee on Bible Translation in 2016.
  18. 18. Today’s Committee on Bible Translation Dr. Bruce Waltke is Emeritus Professor of Old Testament Studies at Regent College, Vancouver, and also taught for many years at Reformed Theological Seminary in Orlando, Florida. He received a PhD from Harvard University and a ThD and ThM from Dallas Theological Seminary. Waltke has travelled widely as a Bible expositor, as an Area Supervisor for excavations at Gezer, Israel, and as Director of field study trips to the Middle East and the Classical World. He is the author of many books and commentaries. He has served as president of the Evangelical Theological Society, was on the translation committee of the New American Standard Bible and the New International Version, joining the CBT in 1980. Dr. Michael Williams is Professor of Old Testament at Calvin Theological Seminary, where he teaches classes in Hebrew, Old Testament, and ancient Near-Eastern history and culture. He holds his PhD in Biblical Studies from the University of Pennsylvania (1999) and his MA in Religion from Westminster Theological Seminary. He was ordained in 2000 in the Christian Reformed Church. Dr. Williams has taught courses at Westminster Theological Seminary, the University of Pennsylvania, and in Kenya, Ukraine, and Poland. Michael is gifted in his capacity for languages. He is proficient in seven Ancient and Medieval Languages (Biblical Hebrew and Aramaic, Akkadian, Ugaritic, Sumerian, Arabic and Greek), and reads French, German and Modern Hebrew. He is the author of several books and articles and joined the CBT in 2005. Secretary Secretary Dr. Larry L. Walker holds a PhD from Dropsie College for Hebrew and Cognate Learning. He is Professor of Old Testament and Semitic Languages at Mid-America Baptist Theological Seminary in Memphis. He has taught Hebrew and other ancient languages (such as Aramaic, Akkadian, and Ugaritic) at the seminary level for 30 years. Dr. Walker also served on the International Council of Biblical Inerrancy that drafted the “Chicago Statement on Inerrancy.” He joined the CBT in 1968.
  19. 19. 1 3 Biblica is the worldwide translation sponsor of the NIV. For over 200 years, Biblica has been reaching people with God's Word through reliable, easy–to–read translations. Every Bible published by Biblica — from the NIV to Ethiopia's Amharic Bible — delivers accuracy through rigorous attention to both the original Bible manuscripts and the target language. Biblica offers a host of free Bible study tools, low- cost Bibles, and community reading experiences to help you engage God's Word. Zondervan, part of HarperCollins Christian Publishing, is the exclusive North American publisher of the NIV and a provider of Christian communications. For more than 80 years, Zondervan has delivered transformational Christian experiences through its bestselling Bibles, books, curriculum, academic resources and digital products. The company’s products are sold in multiple formats, worldwide in more than 60 countries, translated into nearly 200 languages. Zondervan offices are located in Grand Rapids, MI. Hodder & Stoughton is the exclusive United Kingdom publisher of the NIV and a major publisher within Hachette UK, one of the UK’s biggest publishing groups. Hodder & Stoughton publishes a wide range of fiction and non-fiction titles and are renowned for passion, quality and delivering bestselling commercial books in many different formats. NIV Publishing Partnership
  20. 20. With calloutEndorsements "The New International Version follows in the same tradition as the King James Version, although it is tailor-made for the way English is spoken around the world today. The NIV is the most popular translation today because it remains faithful to the original Scriptures while being easy for people to understand. And when we're teaching and sharing God's Word with others, it is imperative that we consider the language people are speaking every day." — Charles Stanley, Senior Pastor, First Baptist in Atlanta, GA and Founder of In Touch Ministries “I have been using the NIV 2011 in my personal devotions and preaching. Where I have checked the translation updates, I have found them a real improvement, even superb!” — Dr. Timothy George, Dean of Beeson Divinity School, Samford University, Birmingham, AL “The translators of the NIV Update have done for believers in the 21st century what the KJV translators did for believers in the 17th century: Both translations sought complete accuracy and the best of current English language usage, and both succeeded. The NIV will now continue to be at the forefront of modern English Bibles as the best translation for both public and private use. It combines accuracy and readability better than any other translation.” — Dr. Larry Hart, Professor of Theology, Graduate School of Theology and Ministry, Oral Roberts University, Tulsa, OK
  21. 21. With callout to the right. — Rev. Randy Frazee, Senior Minister of Oak Hills Church, San Antonio, TX — Tremper Longman III – Robert H. Gundry Professor of Biblical Studies, Westmont College, Santa Barbara, CA “The NIV is the authority for Evangelical Christians around the world.” — Dr. Tony Campolo, Professor Emeritus of Sociology at Eastern University, founder and president of the Evangelical Association for the Promotion of Education Endorsements “As a pastor who is passionate about communicating the Gospel, I'm thankful for the NIV and how the CBT carefully reviews and updates the translation to best reflect the language of this generation.” — Rev. Craig Groeschel, founding and senior pastor of LifeChurch.tv, Edmond, OK "NIV 2011 is a gift to the church. As a professor of Old Testament and a translator myself, I understand and appreciate this version’s fidelity to proper translation method. Its clear, readable English is accurate to the original languages, communicating the Bible’s rich message in a way that will reach people of all ages, education, and spiritual maturity. Produced by the leading evangelical biblical scholars of the day, this Bible is suitable for devotions, deep study, casual reading, group study, and in the pulpit." — Tremper Longman III – Robert H. Gundry Professor of Biblical Studies, Westmont College, Santa Barbara, CA "I enjoy reading and preaching from the NIV here in our ministry in New York City. After more than 25 years, it continues to be my favorite version of God's Word." — Pastor Jim Cymbala, Senior Pastor, Brooklyn Tabernacle "Nehemiah 8:12 tells us that the people were filled with great joy 'because they now understood the words that had been made know to them.' Over the twenty plus years I have had the privilege to teach God's Word to people I have used the NIV as my primary translation. In my estimation, the NIV provides the best translation to the original text while using a language style that is easier for contemporary folks to understand. I have started using the new NIV this year with the same confidence I have had all these years. I believe with all my heart that this translation will fill the lives of people today with great joy!" — Rev. Randy Frazee, Senior Minister of Oak Hills Church, San Antonio, TX “The NIV is the authority for Evangelical Christians around the world.” — Dr. Tony Campolo, Professor Emeritus of Sociology at Eastern University, founder and president of the Evangelical Association for the Promotion of Education
  22. 22. Visit TheNIVBible.com for more free resources FREE NIV Bible App FREE NIV translation app allows you to stream the complete NIV text and gives you full-access to many popular NIV Bibles to try for a limited time! You also gain access to historical articles and videos that share the history of the NIV, introduce the committee of distinguished scholars that work on the translation, and share the impact the NIV is having all over the world. There is even an NIV 365-Day Devotional to help you stay in the God’s Word all year! The NIV 365-Day Devotional Sign-up to receive a *FREE* NIV Scripture passage and insight every day in your inbox! Each day’s devotion is drawn from an NIV study or devotional Bible offering variety as you explore the Word each day. Click Here to Read Today’s Devotional The NIV Verse of the Day Get daily encouragement to your inbox daily with the free NIV Verse-of-the-Day! Sign Up Here to Get Started! FREE RESOURCES

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