SlideShare a Scribd company logo
1 of 4
Download to read offline
Six Quick Teamwork Games to Engage Employees at Work
by Zaina Ghabra on August 23, 2012 in Leadership and Management, Teamwork and
Communication
Communication and positive workplace interactions are the cornerstone of any
professional relationship. Whether you are communicating with a colleague, manager,
or customer,effective communication is always needed. Not only will this reduce
confusion and frustration in the office, it will also help keep your employees engaged.
Sometimes, communication needs to be encouraged. And sometimes to be effective,
communication must also be practiced. Research shows that team exercises not only
improve communication and motivation among workers, but it also helps create a more
cohesive and productive work environment. Here are six refreshing exercises that will
help you encourage teamwork and communication in the office.
Concentration
If your team is feeling drained and stressed, this fun exercise is a great way to refresh
and energize them. It doesn’t require much time and the recommended group size is
10-20 people.
1. Participants will need to form two equal lines facing each other.
2. The game starts when one line turns around, giving the second line 40 seconds to change 10
things about themselves. This can include anything from jewelry or clothing being swapped with
other people, untied shoelaces, a different hair do, or a switched watch or ring to the other hand.
All changes must be something the other group can see.
3. After 40 seconds, the first group turns around and tries to find all the changes the other group
made.
4. Once the changes have been recognized, the groups switch, giving each team a chance to make
changes.
This game will stimulate the participants’ minds and challenge their memory.
Incorporate this activity when a lack of energy is apparent.
Grab Bag Skits
This acting exercise is another great way to refresh and energize your team. It doesn’t
require much time but does need some props. Depending on the number of groups you
have, each group will need a goodie bag filled with five to six random objects.
Recommended group size can range from 10-50 people.
1. Form groups composed of three to eight people. (The more groups, the more time this activity
requires).
2. Give each group a goodie bag.
3. Each group needs to create a three minute skit using all the objects in their goodie bag. Creativity
is encouraged, example: a pen can be a magic wand, a stapler can be a microphone, etc.
4. As the manager, you can either allow your groups to make-up their own skits, or assign them
general topics. Topics should be work related, maybe acting out a meeting, process or event.
5. Give the groups about five minutes to come up with their skits.
Each group performs.
6. Optional step: groups can vote for which group they thought had the best performance. The
winning group can be awarded anything from a casual dress day to lunch.
Tip: It’s important that all group members are present for the other group performances.
This exercise is a great way to encourage people to step out of their comfort zones. It
encourages teamwork, collaboration, and helps people feel more comfortable with their
colleagues.
Salt and Pepper
This activity is fun, excellent for energizing your team, and also great as a get-to-know-
one another exercise. It doesn’t take up a lot of time and requires a few simple materials
like a pen, tape, and small sheets of paper. Recommended group size can range from
6-40 people.
1. A sheet of paper for every person.
2. As manager, come up with pairs of things such as, salt and pepper, yin and yang, shadow and
light, peanut butter and jelly, Mickey and Minnie mouse, male and female, and so forth.
3. Separate the pairs and write only one of them per piece of paper. (Salt on one paper, pepper on a
completely different paper).
4. Tape one paper on the back of each person, making sure they can’t see it.
5. When you say go, everyone must walk around asking yes or no questions in order to find out
what word they have taped to their backs.
6. Once they figure that out, they’ll be able to find their other pair. The two will sit down and learn
three to five interesting facts about one another.
7. Optional step: have the pairs introduce their partners and the interesting facts they learned about
them.
This exercise will encourage communication and creativity among the participants.
Learning how to ask the right questions will be a challenge. It will also encourage
teamwork as interacting with the other team members is necessary.
Take What You Need
This exercise is an excellent get-to-know-you activity that doesn’t take up too much of
your team’s time. All you need is a toilet paper roll or two depending on the size of the
group (you can use pennies as another option). Recommended group size is 10-30
people.
1. Ask everyone to sit around in a circle.
2. Pass around the roll of toilet paper or pennies and tell them to take as much as they think they’ll
need, without disclosing what the items will be used for.
3. If your employees ask further questions, simply answer them with, “take as much as you think
you’ll need.”
4. Once that’s done, ask them to count the number of squares they each have.
5. Going around the circle, each person has to share a fact about themselves for every square of
toilet paper or penny they took. So, if someone takes 10 squares, they need to share 10 facts
about themselves.
Tip: In order to avoid someone taking 30 pennies or squares of toilet paper, you could
set a limit for each item. The facts don’t have to be long or time consuming.
This activity is particularly beneficial when new employees are hired. It encourages
communication, bonding, and helps the participants learn more about their colleagues.
You’d be surprised what a simple activity can teach you about someone you thought
you knew.
Beach Ball Toss
Whether you’re adding on new team members, merging departments or trying to
strengthen the bond between existing employees, the following exercise is great as a
get-to-know-one-another activity and doesn’t require much time. Recommended group
size is 5-25 people.
All you need for this activity is a beach ball that’s been divided with random questions
written on it. (Only you, as the manager should know what questions are on the ball).
Questions can be simple or more complex, i.e. what’s your favorite dessert? what are
your weekly goals? if conflict were to arise within your department, how would you go
about handling that?
1. Have the participants stand in a circle and begin tossing the ball around. Whoever catches the
ball needs to introduce themselves and answer the question closest to their pinky finger.
(Another option would be to allow them to choose which question they’d like to answer).
Tip: When coming up with the questions, you may ask the participants to submit three
questions each and pick which questions you’d like to write on the ball.
This exercise will help the participants learn more about their colleagues. Unlike a
regular meeting, this is a more exciting way to give everyone an opportunity to stay
current with each other’s goals and activities.
Human Knot
This brain teaser is funny and really works on teambuilding, problem solving and
communication. It will take around 15-30 minutes depending on how well everyone
works together. No materials are needed. Recommended group size ranges from 8-20
people.
1. Instruct the participants to stand in a circle, shoulder to shoulder.
2. Tell everyone to put their right hand in the air and grab the hand of someone standing across the
circle from them.
3. Now tell everyone to put their left hand in the air and grab the hand of a different person.
4. Someone needs to check that everyone is holding the hands of two different people and that no
one is holding the hand of someone who’s standing directly next to them.
5. The objective of the game is to untangle everyone without breaking the circle.
6. If the chain is broken, participants will have to start over.
TIP: Announce that this game requires casual clothing. Also remind others to be mindful
of colleagues, especially those with certain physical limitations.
This exercise will prove to be extremely challenging and will heavily rely on teamwork
and communication, without which, participants will find it extremely difficult to
successfully complete the task.
Now that you’re equipped with a variety of choices, don’t be afraid to incorporate these
activities in the office. Not only will you enjoy it and benefit greatly, but so will your
colleagues and employees. Don’t forget to post back and let us know which exercises
you used and what you learned from them!

More Related Content

Similar to Six quick teamwork games to engage employees at work

Team Building Portfilio
Team Building PortfilioTeam Building Portfilio
Team Building PortfilioColin Zipfel
 
Team building activity2__139
Team building activity2__139Team building activity2__139
Team building activity2__139farooknafith
 
Teambuilding exercises witz
Teambuilding exercises witzTeambuilding exercises witz
Teambuilding exercises witzTrainingArena
 
Fun Team Building: Fresh Takes on Traditional Weekly Team Building
Fun Team Building: Fresh Takes on Traditional Weekly Team BuildingFun Team Building: Fresh Takes on Traditional Weekly Team Building
Fun Team Building: Fresh Takes on Traditional Weekly Team BuildingFun Team Building
 
Check-in Deck, by Chris Marcell Murchison of HopeLab
Check-in Deck, by Chris Marcell Murchison of HopeLabCheck-in Deck, by Chris Marcell Murchison of HopeLab
Check-in Deck, by Chris Marcell Murchison of HopeLabHopeLab
 
Hl check in_deck_ebook_20140117
Hl check in_deck_ebook_20140117Hl check in_deck_ebook_20140117
Hl check in_deck_ebook_20140117HopeLab
 
26 pieces of unsolicited and totally obvious career advice to make you more s...
26 pieces of unsolicited and totally obvious career advice to make you more s...26 pieces of unsolicited and totally obvious career advice to make you more s...
26 pieces of unsolicited and totally obvious career advice to make you more s...Haley Bryant
 
77RelationshipBuildingActions.pdf
77RelationshipBuildingActions.pdf77RelationshipBuildingActions.pdf
77RelationshipBuildingActions.pdfDonna Cutting, CSP
 
Staff Development Reference Guide
Staff Development Reference GuideStaff Development Reference Guide
Staff Development Reference GuideCourtney Drew
 
Relationships, Technology, and Mental Health
Relationships, Technology, and Mental HealthRelationships, Technology, and Mental Health
Relationships, Technology, and Mental HealthTammy Fry, Ph.D.
 
8 Not So Common Icebreaker Activities for Team Building
8 Not So Common Icebreaker Activities for Team Building8 Not So Common Icebreaker Activities for Team Building
8 Not So Common Icebreaker Activities for Team BuildingKavika Roy
 
Teambuilders and activities
Teambuilders and activitiesTeambuilders and activities
Teambuilders and activitiesKaaryn Jakobson
 
Team Building Activities
Team Building ActivitiesTeam Building Activities
Team Building ActivitiesAngelin R
 
2 personality development games february
2 personality development games february2 personality development games february
2 personality development games februaryGeorge Pullatt
 

Similar to Six quick teamwork games to engage employees at work (20)

Team Building Portfilio
Team Building PortfilioTeam Building Portfilio
Team Building Portfilio
 
Games
GamesGames
Games
 
Top 20-team-building-exercises-activites
Top 20-team-building-exercises-activitesTop 20-team-building-exercises-activites
Top 20-team-building-exercises-activites
 
Team building activity2__139
Team building activity2__139Team building activity2__139
Team building activity2__139
 
Teambuilding exercises witz
Teambuilding exercises witzTeambuilding exercises witz
Teambuilding exercises witz
 
Fun Team Building: Fresh Takes on Traditional Weekly Team Building
Fun Team Building: Fresh Takes on Traditional Weekly Team BuildingFun Team Building: Fresh Takes on Traditional Weekly Team Building
Fun Team Building: Fresh Takes on Traditional Weekly Team Building
 
Check-in Deck, by Chris Marcell Murchison of HopeLab
Check-in Deck, by Chris Marcell Murchison of HopeLabCheck-in Deck, by Chris Marcell Murchison of HopeLab
Check-in Deck, by Chris Marcell Murchison of HopeLab
 
Hl check in_deck_ebook_20140117
Hl check in_deck_ebook_20140117Hl check in_deck_ebook_20140117
Hl check in_deck_ebook_20140117
 
Team building games
Team building gamesTeam building games
Team building games
 
Ideas For Changing Your Classroom Into A Community
Ideas For Changing Your Classroom Into A CommunityIdeas For Changing Your Classroom Into A Community
Ideas For Changing Your Classroom Into A Community
 
26 pieces of unsolicited and totally obvious career advice to make you more s...
26 pieces of unsolicited and totally obvious career advice to make you more s...26 pieces of unsolicited and totally obvious career advice to make you more s...
26 pieces of unsolicited and totally obvious career advice to make you more s...
 
Workshop Resource
Workshop ResourceWorkshop Resource
Workshop Resource
 
77RelationshipBuildingActions.pdf
77RelationshipBuildingActions.pdf77RelationshipBuildingActions.pdf
77RelationshipBuildingActions.pdf
 
Staff Development Reference Guide
Staff Development Reference GuideStaff Development Reference Guide
Staff Development Reference Guide
 
Relationships, Technology, and Mental Health
Relationships, Technology, and Mental HealthRelationships, Technology, and Mental Health
Relationships, Technology, and Mental Health
 
8 Not So Common Icebreaker Activities for Team Building
8 Not So Common Icebreaker Activities for Team Building8 Not So Common Icebreaker Activities for Team Building
8 Not So Common Icebreaker Activities for Team Building
 
Teambuilders and activities
Teambuilders and activitiesTeambuilders and activities
Teambuilders and activities
 
Teambuilders and activities
Teambuilders and activitiesTeambuilders and activities
Teambuilders and activities
 
Team Building Activities
Team Building ActivitiesTeam Building Activities
Team Building Activities
 
2 personality development games february
2 personality development games february2 personality development games february
2 personality development games february
 

Recently uploaded

Mastering Management Insights from First Break All the Rules.pptx
Mastering Management Insights from First Break All the Rules.pptxMastering Management Insights from First Break All the Rules.pptx
Mastering Management Insights from First Break All the Rules.pptxAS Design & AST.
 
Management and optimization of information flows-EN.pdf
Management and optimization of information flows-EN.pdfManagement and optimization of information flows-EN.pdf
Management and optimization of information flows-EN.pdfGeorgeDiamandis11
 
BoSUSA23 | Chris Spiek & Justin Dickow | Autobooks Product & Engineering
BoSUSA23 | Chris Spiek & Justin Dickow | Autobooks Product & EngineeringBoSUSA23 | Chris Spiek & Justin Dickow | Autobooks Product & Engineering
BoSUSA23 | Chris Spiek & Justin Dickow | Autobooks Product & EngineeringBusiness of Software Conference
 
Flowcharting: The Three Common Types of Flowcharts
Flowcharting: The Three Common Types of FlowchartsFlowcharting: The Three Common Types of Flowcharts
Flowcharting: The Three Common Types of FlowchartsCIToolkit
 
The Role of Histograms in Exploring Data Insights
The Role of Histograms in Exploring Data InsightsThe Role of Histograms in Exploring Data Insights
The Role of Histograms in Exploring Data InsightsCIToolkit
 
Exploring Variable Relationships with Scatter Diagram Analysis
Exploring Variable Relationships with Scatter Diagram AnalysisExploring Variable Relationships with Scatter Diagram Analysis
Exploring Variable Relationships with Scatter Diagram AnalysisCIToolkit
 
Value Analysis: How Lean Thinking Defines Value
Value Analysis: How Lean Thinking Defines ValueValue Analysis: How Lean Thinking Defines Value
Value Analysis: How Lean Thinking Defines ValueCIToolkit
 
The Main Components of an Effective Visual Management System
The Main Components of an Effective Visual Management SystemThe Main Components of an Effective Visual Management System
The Main Components of an Effective Visual Management SystemCIToolkit
 
Introduction to Basic Drill and Ceremonies.pdf
Introduction to Basic Drill and Ceremonies.pdfIntroduction to Basic Drill and Ceremonies.pdf
Introduction to Basic Drill and Ceremonies.pdfRonaldChuma2
 
Yokoten: Enhancing Performance through Best Practice Sharing
Yokoten: Enhancing Performance through Best Practice SharingYokoten: Enhancing Performance through Best Practice Sharing
Yokoten: Enhancing Performance through Best Practice SharingCIToolkit
 
Leveraging Gap Analysis for Continuous Improvement
Leveraging Gap Analysis for Continuous ImprovementLeveraging Gap Analysis for Continuous Improvement
Leveraging Gap Analysis for Continuous ImprovementCIToolkit
 
WHO Foresight Approaches in Public Health.pdf
WHO Foresight Approaches in Public Health.pdfWHO Foresight Approaches in Public Health.pdf
WHO Foresight Approaches in Public Health.pdfWendy Schultz
 
Critical thinking categorical syllogism pptx
Critical thinking categorical syllogism pptxCritical thinking categorical syllogism pptx
Critical thinking categorical syllogism pptxcalinagavris17
 
Leading meetings effectively: the secrets of authentic leadership
Leading meetings effectively: the secrets of authentic leadershipLeading meetings effectively: the secrets of authentic leadership
Leading meetings effectively: the secrets of authentic leadershipAndrea Mennillo
 
BoSON23 | Alex Osterwalder | Coaching & Leadership in Remote Companies
BoSON23 | Alex Osterwalder | Coaching & Leadership in Remote CompaniesBoSON23 | Alex Osterwalder | Coaching & Leadership in Remote Companies
BoSON23 | Alex Osterwalder | Coaching & Leadership in Remote CompaniesBusiness of Software Conference
 
Process Charts and Process Sequence Charts: Tools for Process Improvement
Process Charts and Process Sequence Charts: Tools for Process ImprovementProcess Charts and Process Sequence Charts: Tools for Process Improvement
Process Charts and Process Sequence Charts: Tools for Process ImprovementCIToolkit
 
Overview PMI Infinity - UK Chapter presentation
Overview PMI Infinity - UK Chapter presentationOverview PMI Infinity - UK Chapter presentation
Overview PMI Infinity - UK Chapter presentationPMIUKChapter
 
5 years Business Plan for EParivahan.com
5 years Business Plan for EParivahan.com5 years Business Plan for EParivahan.com
5 years Business Plan for EParivahan.comDEEPRAJ PATHAK
 

Recently uploaded (18)

Mastering Management Insights from First Break All the Rules.pptx
Mastering Management Insights from First Break All the Rules.pptxMastering Management Insights from First Break All the Rules.pptx
Mastering Management Insights from First Break All the Rules.pptx
 
Management and optimization of information flows-EN.pdf
Management and optimization of information flows-EN.pdfManagement and optimization of information flows-EN.pdf
Management and optimization of information flows-EN.pdf
 
BoSUSA23 | Chris Spiek & Justin Dickow | Autobooks Product & Engineering
BoSUSA23 | Chris Spiek & Justin Dickow | Autobooks Product & EngineeringBoSUSA23 | Chris Spiek & Justin Dickow | Autobooks Product & Engineering
BoSUSA23 | Chris Spiek & Justin Dickow | Autobooks Product & Engineering
 
Flowcharting: The Three Common Types of Flowcharts
Flowcharting: The Three Common Types of FlowchartsFlowcharting: The Three Common Types of Flowcharts
Flowcharting: The Three Common Types of Flowcharts
 
The Role of Histograms in Exploring Data Insights
The Role of Histograms in Exploring Data InsightsThe Role of Histograms in Exploring Data Insights
The Role of Histograms in Exploring Data Insights
 
Exploring Variable Relationships with Scatter Diagram Analysis
Exploring Variable Relationships with Scatter Diagram AnalysisExploring Variable Relationships with Scatter Diagram Analysis
Exploring Variable Relationships with Scatter Diagram Analysis
 
Value Analysis: How Lean Thinking Defines Value
Value Analysis: How Lean Thinking Defines ValueValue Analysis: How Lean Thinking Defines Value
Value Analysis: How Lean Thinking Defines Value
 
The Main Components of an Effective Visual Management System
The Main Components of an Effective Visual Management SystemThe Main Components of an Effective Visual Management System
The Main Components of an Effective Visual Management System
 
Introduction to Basic Drill and Ceremonies.pdf
Introduction to Basic Drill and Ceremonies.pdfIntroduction to Basic Drill and Ceremonies.pdf
Introduction to Basic Drill and Ceremonies.pdf
 
Yokoten: Enhancing Performance through Best Practice Sharing
Yokoten: Enhancing Performance through Best Practice SharingYokoten: Enhancing Performance through Best Practice Sharing
Yokoten: Enhancing Performance through Best Practice Sharing
 
Leveraging Gap Analysis for Continuous Improvement
Leveraging Gap Analysis for Continuous ImprovementLeveraging Gap Analysis for Continuous Improvement
Leveraging Gap Analysis for Continuous Improvement
 
WHO Foresight Approaches in Public Health.pdf
WHO Foresight Approaches in Public Health.pdfWHO Foresight Approaches in Public Health.pdf
WHO Foresight Approaches in Public Health.pdf
 
Critical thinking categorical syllogism pptx
Critical thinking categorical syllogism pptxCritical thinking categorical syllogism pptx
Critical thinking categorical syllogism pptx
 
Leading meetings effectively: the secrets of authentic leadership
Leading meetings effectively: the secrets of authentic leadershipLeading meetings effectively: the secrets of authentic leadership
Leading meetings effectively: the secrets of authentic leadership
 
BoSON23 | Alex Osterwalder | Coaching & Leadership in Remote Companies
BoSON23 | Alex Osterwalder | Coaching & Leadership in Remote CompaniesBoSON23 | Alex Osterwalder | Coaching & Leadership in Remote Companies
BoSON23 | Alex Osterwalder | Coaching & Leadership in Remote Companies
 
Process Charts and Process Sequence Charts: Tools for Process Improvement
Process Charts and Process Sequence Charts: Tools for Process ImprovementProcess Charts and Process Sequence Charts: Tools for Process Improvement
Process Charts and Process Sequence Charts: Tools for Process Improvement
 
Overview PMI Infinity - UK Chapter presentation
Overview PMI Infinity - UK Chapter presentationOverview PMI Infinity - UK Chapter presentation
Overview PMI Infinity - UK Chapter presentation
 
5 years Business Plan for EParivahan.com
5 years Business Plan for EParivahan.com5 years Business Plan for EParivahan.com
5 years Business Plan for EParivahan.com
 

Six quick teamwork games to engage employees at work

  • 1. Six Quick Teamwork Games to Engage Employees at Work by Zaina Ghabra on August 23, 2012 in Leadership and Management, Teamwork and Communication Communication and positive workplace interactions are the cornerstone of any professional relationship. Whether you are communicating with a colleague, manager, or customer,effective communication is always needed. Not only will this reduce confusion and frustration in the office, it will also help keep your employees engaged. Sometimes, communication needs to be encouraged. And sometimes to be effective, communication must also be practiced. Research shows that team exercises not only improve communication and motivation among workers, but it also helps create a more cohesive and productive work environment. Here are six refreshing exercises that will help you encourage teamwork and communication in the office. Concentration If your team is feeling drained and stressed, this fun exercise is a great way to refresh and energize them. It doesn’t require much time and the recommended group size is 10-20 people. 1. Participants will need to form two equal lines facing each other. 2. The game starts when one line turns around, giving the second line 40 seconds to change 10 things about themselves. This can include anything from jewelry or clothing being swapped with other people, untied shoelaces, a different hair do, or a switched watch or ring to the other hand. All changes must be something the other group can see. 3. After 40 seconds, the first group turns around and tries to find all the changes the other group made. 4. Once the changes have been recognized, the groups switch, giving each team a chance to make changes. This game will stimulate the participants’ minds and challenge their memory. Incorporate this activity when a lack of energy is apparent. Grab Bag Skits This acting exercise is another great way to refresh and energize your team. It doesn’t require much time but does need some props. Depending on the number of groups you have, each group will need a goodie bag filled with five to six random objects. Recommended group size can range from 10-50 people. 1. Form groups composed of three to eight people. (The more groups, the more time this activity requires). 2. Give each group a goodie bag.
  • 2. 3. Each group needs to create a three minute skit using all the objects in their goodie bag. Creativity is encouraged, example: a pen can be a magic wand, a stapler can be a microphone, etc. 4. As the manager, you can either allow your groups to make-up their own skits, or assign them general topics. Topics should be work related, maybe acting out a meeting, process or event. 5. Give the groups about five minutes to come up with their skits. Each group performs. 6. Optional step: groups can vote for which group they thought had the best performance. The winning group can be awarded anything from a casual dress day to lunch. Tip: It’s important that all group members are present for the other group performances. This exercise is a great way to encourage people to step out of their comfort zones. It encourages teamwork, collaboration, and helps people feel more comfortable with their colleagues. Salt and Pepper This activity is fun, excellent for energizing your team, and also great as a get-to-know- one another exercise. It doesn’t take up a lot of time and requires a few simple materials like a pen, tape, and small sheets of paper. Recommended group size can range from 6-40 people. 1. A sheet of paper for every person. 2. As manager, come up with pairs of things such as, salt and pepper, yin and yang, shadow and light, peanut butter and jelly, Mickey and Minnie mouse, male and female, and so forth. 3. Separate the pairs and write only one of them per piece of paper. (Salt on one paper, pepper on a completely different paper). 4. Tape one paper on the back of each person, making sure they can’t see it. 5. When you say go, everyone must walk around asking yes or no questions in order to find out what word they have taped to their backs. 6. Once they figure that out, they’ll be able to find their other pair. The two will sit down and learn three to five interesting facts about one another. 7. Optional step: have the pairs introduce their partners and the interesting facts they learned about them. This exercise will encourage communication and creativity among the participants. Learning how to ask the right questions will be a challenge. It will also encourage teamwork as interacting with the other team members is necessary. Take What You Need This exercise is an excellent get-to-know-you activity that doesn’t take up too much of your team’s time. All you need is a toilet paper roll or two depending on the size of the group (you can use pennies as another option). Recommended group size is 10-30 people. 1. Ask everyone to sit around in a circle.
  • 3. 2. Pass around the roll of toilet paper or pennies and tell them to take as much as they think they’ll need, without disclosing what the items will be used for. 3. If your employees ask further questions, simply answer them with, “take as much as you think you’ll need.” 4. Once that’s done, ask them to count the number of squares they each have. 5. Going around the circle, each person has to share a fact about themselves for every square of toilet paper or penny they took. So, if someone takes 10 squares, they need to share 10 facts about themselves. Tip: In order to avoid someone taking 30 pennies or squares of toilet paper, you could set a limit for each item. The facts don’t have to be long or time consuming. This activity is particularly beneficial when new employees are hired. It encourages communication, bonding, and helps the participants learn more about their colleagues. You’d be surprised what a simple activity can teach you about someone you thought you knew. Beach Ball Toss Whether you’re adding on new team members, merging departments or trying to strengthen the bond between existing employees, the following exercise is great as a get-to-know-one-another activity and doesn’t require much time. Recommended group size is 5-25 people. All you need for this activity is a beach ball that’s been divided with random questions written on it. (Only you, as the manager should know what questions are on the ball). Questions can be simple or more complex, i.e. what’s your favorite dessert? what are your weekly goals? if conflict were to arise within your department, how would you go about handling that? 1. Have the participants stand in a circle and begin tossing the ball around. Whoever catches the ball needs to introduce themselves and answer the question closest to their pinky finger. (Another option would be to allow them to choose which question they’d like to answer). Tip: When coming up with the questions, you may ask the participants to submit three questions each and pick which questions you’d like to write on the ball. This exercise will help the participants learn more about their colleagues. Unlike a regular meeting, this is a more exciting way to give everyone an opportunity to stay current with each other’s goals and activities. Human Knot This brain teaser is funny and really works on teambuilding, problem solving and communication. It will take around 15-30 minutes depending on how well everyone
  • 4. works together. No materials are needed. Recommended group size ranges from 8-20 people. 1. Instruct the participants to stand in a circle, shoulder to shoulder. 2. Tell everyone to put their right hand in the air and grab the hand of someone standing across the circle from them. 3. Now tell everyone to put their left hand in the air and grab the hand of a different person. 4. Someone needs to check that everyone is holding the hands of two different people and that no one is holding the hand of someone who’s standing directly next to them. 5. The objective of the game is to untangle everyone without breaking the circle. 6. If the chain is broken, participants will have to start over. TIP: Announce that this game requires casual clothing. Also remind others to be mindful of colleagues, especially those with certain physical limitations. This exercise will prove to be extremely challenging and will heavily rely on teamwork and communication, without which, participants will find it extremely difficult to successfully complete the task. Now that you’re equipped with a variety of choices, don’t be afraid to incorporate these activities in the office. Not only will you enjoy it and benefit greatly, but so will your colleagues and employees. Don’t forget to post back and let us know which exercises you used and what you learned from them!