Chief Marketing Officer Congress, Sopot

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Chief Marketing Officer Congress, Sopot

  1. 1. DELIBERATELY MEANINGFULRobin Hamman, Director of Digital, Edelman@Cybersoc 1
  2. 2. Headshift Academic Research ITV BBC BBS Lynx, Mosaic Start-Up BBC Edelman 1985 1991 1995 1998 1999 2001 2008 2010 2A bit about me....1985 - ran a local BBS service using my apple IIe1991- went to university requiring all students to have access, from their bedroom, to internet1995 - MA in Sociology - topic of dissertation was Cybersex in AOL Chat Rooms1998 - Joined the BBC as the first “Online Community Specialist”- launched message board platform and training in community management- launched web chat platform and training1999 - Completed my part-time MPhil in Communication Studies with study of “Offline Effects of Online Community Participation”; Briefly joined a mobile start up then moved to ITV2001 - Left ITV to return to the BBC- rolled out more message boards- helped define staff blogging and social media guidelines- launched and ran the BBC blogs- audience at time I left was 20 million page impressions per month, just 18 months post launch2008 - joined social business consultancy Headshift2010 - joined Edelman as Director of Digital
  3. 3. PART ONE: A BIT OF THEORY A Shifting Landscape... (CC) http://www.flickr.com/photos/apodd/5064813896/ 3Presentation Outline:Part One - TheoryPart Two - Real World Examples
  4. 4. COMPLEX STAKEHOLDER ECOSYSTEM… Your Brand 4Brands and organisations increasingly exist within a complex, multi-stakeholder ecosystem that exists across multiple channels, platforms and geographies - and that is alwaysswitched on.With so many stakeholders, the job of keeping track of them all is increasingly challenging... but social media tools can help.
  5. 5. CONNECTED SPHERES OF DIGITAL Social Em n ba ss tio ies e ga 670 gr Ag Seamless Visibility Own Search SEO & SEM 5And just as stakeholders and touchpoints are everywhere, itʼs increasingly important that your brand is everywhere online. The threeinterlocking spheres here show how your owned web properties, social media, and search are all interlinked in maintaining and raising yourvisibility online.
  6. 6. A MULTIPLICITY OF TOUCH POINTS… Derived from: (CC) http://www.flickr.com/photos/intersectionconsulting/3508041510/ 6Stakeholders, consumers, competitors, regulators, recruits... they’re everywhere, and there are many touch-points, some purposefully created, others incidental, and still otherstotally unexpected, where these audiences can and will seek to engage.You’re a parent.You meet another parent outside the school gates and discover that they work for a leading mobile phone company. They love or hate their employer - andduring 3 minutes of chit chat they set your expectations of the brand.You’re a user of facebook and a friend of a friend introduces themselves.You accept their friend request and watch their updates. They are your interface to the company.You call a customer support centre and wait 15 minutes to speak with someone. They deny their is a problem.You are in a retail outlet and have a great experience with a helpful, knowledgable member of staff....Your financial advisor tells you that a company is going places... you invest...You read a story in the paper... you hear about a government regulation that will impact an industry... you’re at a trade event... you see an advertisement.IT’S ALL ONE BRAND and your perceptions of it are influences by whatever contacts you have, good and bad, with the people and messages of that organisation.
  7. 7. A MULTIPLICITY OF TOUCH POINTS… wtf? Derived from: (CC) http://www.flickr.com/photos/intersectionconsulting/3508041510/ 7Stakeholders, consumers, competitors, regulators, recruits... they’re everywhere, and there are many touch-points, some purposefully created, others incidental, and still otherstotally unexpected, where these audiences can and will seek to engage.You’re a parent.You meet another parent outside the school gates and discover that they work for a leading mobile phone company. They love or hate their employer - andduring 3 minutes of chit chat they set your expectations of the brand.You’re a user of facebook and a friend of a friend introduces themselves.You accept their friend request and watch their updates. They are your interface to the company.You call a customer support centre and wait 15 minutes to speak with someone. They deny their is a problem.You are in a retail outlet and have a great experience with a helpful, knowledgable member of staff....Your financial advisor tells you that a company is going places... you invest...You read a story in the paper... you hear about a government regulation that will impact an industry... you’re at a trade event... you see an advertisement.IT’S ALL ONE BRAND and your perceptions of it are influences by whatever contacts you have, good and bad, with the people and messages of that organisation.
  8. 8. SILOS INHIBIT ACTION… “To stand out in a commoditized market, companies must understand what customers truly value. The only way to do that is to break down the traditional, often entrenched, silos and unite resources to focus directly on customer needs." ~Ranjay Gulati, Harvard Business Review MARKETING PUBLIC RELATIONS SALES RECRUITMENT CUSTOMER CARE (CC) http://www.flickr.com/photos/docsearls/5500714140/ 8Most businesses, however, aren’t set up to deal effectively with the multiplicity of touch points. In addition to having silos internally, they may alsosilo their budgets, and thus inhibit their agencies from working in a more joined up way. Result? You engage the world as if you are a series ofconfederated organisations - the logo is the same, but the message and the experience may very well be far from cohesive and coherent.
  9. 9. (CC) http://www.flickr.com/photos/whsimages/998243013/ 9We’ve spent some time looking at organisational trends, trying to understand how businesses are dealing with the challenges I’ve outlined. Successful businesses, according toour research, are beginning to think and act differently -* they involve their employees, and where it makes sense to, external stakeholders in defining their business objectives* they recognise that collaborative, open working environments create opportunities for new ideas to flourish* and they understand that employees at all levels can get involved in “communication”
  10. 10. IN THIS TOGETHER “People at all levels of an organisation have stories to share - stories that illuminate their lives and purpose...” (CC) http://www.flickr.com/photos/mobyrock/541865315/ 10To deal with this changed communications landscape must take a lot of resource, right?! Well, with the right tools - and by that I mean social media monitoring as well asguidelines, workflows, and training to enable staff - it’s surprisingly simple to involve your customers, consumers, audiences and other stakeholders in your business.
  11. 11. “A new organizational structure is required to accommodate and benefit from the culture of sharing that social media has fueled over the last four years. The information flow we all experience daily can no longer be organized into neat org-chart silos." ~Charlene Li, Author of Open Leadership http://edelmandigital.com/2010/04/21/social-business-planning-aligning-internal-with-external/ 11So the fascinating shift we’re seeing a lot of our clients make - and social media helps enable this shift - is from being closed to more collaborative to genuinely open. What doesthis actually mean, in relation to social media monitoring, a topic many of you here today are interested in? It means using social media monitoring to understand the feelings,thoughts, desires and needs of your audiences, whoever those are, and ensuring that those insights - which might include early warnings of a looming crisis, opportunities toreach out to an evangelist or opinion leader, opportunities to rectify a failure or shortcoming, and even ideas for product and service innovation - to the people, wherever theyare in the business, who can make use of them.
  12. 12. Programs !"#$%&()*+*,-,). /+01,2)* 3"4.5-,06,07%&, 35--")%&+25)4 (7,).4 3+-8+%*)4 9:75&+&; 6<3=9>?@9AB /(96C@9?>(<CD3</(6 6<3=9>?C6=A(66 !"#$%&()*+ !,$%&()*+ D0+%)%)* !05&,44 <0*+)%E+25)/5:,$4 (-8$5;,,()*+*,-,). !5$%&%,4FG"%:,$%),4 H)5I$,:*,6J+0%)* 3"$."0, Infrastructure http://edelmandigital.com/2010/04/21/social-business-planning-aligning-internal-with-external/ 12The reason I joined Edelman was because I recognised a shift. No longer were marketing and communications activities at the fringes of what brands, organisations andbusinesses are doing - they are at the centre, core to a range of business critical activities. In order for that to be successful, you have to first recognise the change, but then itrequires training, technical infrastructure, processes, policies, creation of a shared culture - and perhaps most importantly, permission from the top.
  13. 13. MEASURABLE OUTCOMES 13But there is little point in embarking on this path unless you’ve got a clear view of what you intend to measure, and what success (or failure) might look like. This is ameasurement framework we put together for a client as they began creating what we call social media embassies - brand controlled spaces and accounts on third party socialplatforms. But as you might have guessed from some of my earlier slides, I think it goes much deeper than this - in addition to these numbers, there are opportunities for othermeasurable outcomes, ones that are tied to business critical tasks ranging from marketing to product and service innovation and delivery. Dig deep with social media and you’llfind the serious metrics.
  14. 14. PART TWO: THE REAL WORLDA Shifting Landscape... (CC) http://www.flickr.com/photos/kretyen/3361953041/ 14
  15. 15. The communications landscape is changing. Driven at pace by the democratising power of digital and the continued shift from a shareholder to a stakeholder society, we are witnessing the emergence of a new model of Public Engagement. Networks have replaced channels; influence has supplanted audience; shared interests are moving us beyond dogma; and multilateral connection is the new dialogue. We are faced daily with a chaos of news and views. The golden age of broadcast is over. Robert Phillips, UK CEO, Edelman http://www.edelman.co.uk/public-engagement/ 15Public Engagement offers an interesting framework which describes the behaviours we’re seeing in digital communications.
  16. 16. the creation of meaningful participatory frameworks that align stakeholder behaviours with measurable business outcomes (CC) http://www.flickr.com/photos/gettysgirl/3692150826/ 16What it means, to me, is focusing on a variety of activities that allow you to create meaningfulparticipatory frameworks that align stakeholder and audience behaviours with measurablebusiness outcomes. There are seven of these activities, or behaviours...
  17. 17. THE SEVEN BEHAVIOURS OF PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT Listen with new intelligence Participate in the conversation: real time / all the time Socialise media relations Create and co-create content Champion open advocacy Build active partnerships for the common good Embrace the chaos (cc) http://www.flickr.com/photos/lincolnian/1328426678/ 17I’m going to use this framework as a way of introducing a wide variety of case studies. If anyof these captures your interest, feel free to note it down and ask a question about it at theend - I’d love the opportunity to go into more detail on some of these.
  18. 18. 1. LISTEN WITH NEW INTELLIGENCE (CC) http://mashable.com/2010/06/15/gatorade-social-media-mission-control/ http://mashable.com/2010/06/15/gatorade-social-media-mission-control/ 18Gatorade - PepsiCo is an Edelman client - has set up a “Social Media Mission Control Center” that staff at all levels, and in all roles, can walk into at any time to find out whatcustomers and other stakeholders are saying about the brand and related topics of interest such as “sports rehydration”.
  19. 19. MONITORING STRATEGY Identify 670 opportunities for pro-active Online discussion and engagement community relating to your core business objectives and messaging Discussion of Brand X Identify opportunities for primarily re-active engagement 19To do all this, you need some tools. Not just social media monitoring service, but other tools including a strategy, workflows, guidelines and measurement frameworks...1. Monitoring strategy:Most organisations and brands that are already monitor tend to focus almost entirely on the more obvious opportunity - monitoring for specific mentions of brand, product,services and the same for their competitors. So, to use an imaginary example, SAS might monitor for “SAS”.There’s another, often missed opportunity, which is to monitor for opportunities to engage with individuals and communities who are discussing topics and issues that areimportant to your brand and it’s messaging.So, for example, I’d imagine that any large airline would monitor for their name, as well, potentially, for conversations about the airports from which they hub or where they havekey routes - eg. SAS might widen their monitoring so that it also covers Copenhagen Airport, CPH, “Copenhagen to London”, “flights to Copenhagen”, “employment inCopenhagen” , “careers in travel industry”, “sustainability in the airline industry”, etc etc.
  20. 20. MONITORING AND RESPONSE This chart is based upon a model used by the United States Air Force to guide their response policies for blogs and a former US Military spokesperson and communications expert. It serves as a ‘guide, not a ball WORKFLOWS... potential issues discovered online. It was designed as a ‘field and chain,’ and still accounts for the need to be nimble in manual’ for USAF representatives in the words of Steven Field, responses to online communications. Have you found social media content about your brand? Is it positive? NO Has the content been avail- YES able online for some time? NO YES A constructive, factual and Is this a site dedicated to bash- well cited response, which ing and degrading others? may agree or disagree with Avoid responding to the content, but is not specific items of content. negative. NO YES Monitor the source for You can acknowledge the relevant information and content, provide an endorse- comments. ment, or let it stand. Is the content a rant, joke, Do you want to respond? ridicule or satirical in nature? NO Respond directly with Does the content contain YES factual information via a public comment. errors? (See Response NO YES Considerations below) NO Let the content stand Is the content the result of a YES Address the situation, -no response bad experience for one of respond and act upon a our stakeholders? reasonable solution. (See Response Considerations below) NO Add value to the content Base response on your present creator by sharing information circumstances and influence, YES about your brand and goals. and profile of content creator. (See blog response Will you respond? considerations below) YES YES Disclose your Cite your sources by Consider your re- Be polite, respectful, Prioritise the most connection. including hyperlinks, ponses, but act swiftly constructive and con- influential and highest video, images or to avoid losing the versational. Aim to profile sources for your other references. moment to influence build a relationship, target audience. the conversation. not start a quarrel. 20Audience fragmentation. Stakeholder ecosystem complexity. Multiplicity of touch points. Silos no longer recognised as meaningful by audiences and inhibiting meaningful action.Broadcast being replaced with conversation....To deal with this changed communications landscape must take a lot of resource, right?! Well, with the right tools - and by that I mean social media monitoring as well asguidelines, workflow, and training to enable staff - it’s surprisingly simple.(Workflow here is derived from a workflow created by the US Military)
  21. 21. MONITORING AND RESPONSE WORKFLOWS... 21Audience fragmentation. Stakeholder ecosystem complexity. Multiplicity of touch points. Silos no longer recognised as meaningful by audiences and inhibiting meaningful action.Broadcast being replaced with conversation....To deal with this changed communications landscape must take a lot of resource, right?! Well, with the right tools - and by that I mean social media monitoring as well asguidelines, workflow, and training to enable staff - it’s surprisingly simple.
  22. 22. LISTENING AS A BUSINESS PLAN http://editd.com 22EditD monitors online conversations about the catwalk shows... then uses this information toforecast trends for clients in the apparel industry.
  23. 23. LISTENING AS CONTENT http://www.shownar.com/ 23Shownar was a BBC service that tracked and linked to online discussions of BBC TV and Radioprogrammes - instead of having to host and moderate discussions on bbc.co.uk, the serviceallowed the BBC to curate the very best content being posted elsewhere.
  24. 24. 2. PARTICIPATE IN THE CONVERSATION (CC) http://www.flickr.com/photos/metrojp/92038203/ 24Wikipedia: Conversation is interactive, more-or-less spontaneous, communication between two or more conversants. Interactivity occurs because contributions to aconversation are response reactions to what has previously been said. Spontaneity occurs because a conversation must proceed, to some extent, and in some way, unpredictably.In other words, successful conversations require both listening and speaking.That’s what social media monitoring - and in my mind social media more widely - is all about: having a conversation, to which you both contribute and gain.
  25. 25. RIGHT FROM THE START http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/manchester/2006/08/starting_a_conversation.shtml 25When I was at the BBC, one of the projects I launched was the BBC Manchester Blog. The idea was, as with Shownar, to experiment in monitoringand linking as a way of bringing the very best user generated content to our audiences without requiring us to host and moderate that content. Forme, the day we launched offered a quick lesson in the value of social media monitoring, when a prominent Manchester blogger raised someworries about our motivations. We spotted this in minutes, responded within half an hour - joining in the conversation and showing that wewanted to participate as equals, to everyone’s benefit.
  26. 26. SPREADING THE WORKLOAD !"#$%&(()$*+,-$(./#*(0()$&%,#.(0%1$2#&$.&%,$(./#*(0$ 2#&0$(./3#2((%$,#$%#34($&%,#.(0$/0#53(.%6$ 78#%-$9(0:#;1$<#00(%,(0$=:>32%,$?$=&,-#0$#@$A./#*(0()$ http://twitter.com/twelpforce 26American electronics retailer BestBuy launched, in the US, TwelpForce. It’s an idea that mirrors much of the thinking I expressed earlier in thispresentation as it’s genuinely about breaking down silos and using a combination of tools - social media monitoring, monitoring and responseworkflows, staff guidelines and training - to improve the customer experience by enabling thousands of staff to engage - always appropriately,helpfully, and in a de-risked way - via twitter and elsewhere online.
  27. 27. ASK QUESTIONS THAT DELIVER ANSWERS http://mystarbucksidea.force.com/ 27Starbucks, an Edelman client, has taken listening and participation in the conversation to heart by asking their customers for suggestions onimproving their product and service offerings. So far, nearly 100,000 ideas have been generated. Most of these are unworkable, but some havebeen put into place.
  28. 28. BE WHERE AUDIENCES ARE Purina Website Purina Web PRESENCE 28One brand who exemplifies this approach is Purina, an American pet food brand. Theyʼve used the entire web as their communicationscanvas, building a community, rather than focusing on a short term campaign. Emotional, conversational content on twitter, youtube, facebookand the pet-centric pet lovers portal all link back to rational brand and product related content on their official website. The result? Increasedvisibility and deeper engagement.
  29. 29. FACILITATE THE CONVERSATION http://www.openforum.com/ 29American Express uses Open Forum to facilitate the conversations small business owners want, and need, to have. Oh, and if you need somecorporate credit cards...
  30. 30. 3. SOCIALISE MEDIA RELATIONS (CC) http://www.flickr.com/photos/creativecommons/2294317199/ 30
  31. 31. EMBED AND SPREAD http://www.flickr.com/photos/jamesyu/366732694/ (cc) http://www.flickr.com/photos/jamesyu/366732694/ 31
  32. 32. 4. CREATE AND CO-CREATE (cc) http://www.flickr.com/photos/lollyman/4424552903/ 32
  33. 33. CO-DESIGN PRODUCTS http://www.threadless.com 33Threadless is an online t-shirt retailer. They have hundreds, if not thousands, of designs - yet not designers on staff. That’s because they ask theircustomers to contribute t-shirt design ideas, with other customers voting and offering suggestions to improve the designs. Once a design ischosen, just about everyone who was involved in the creative process gets involved in telling their friends - that is marketing - the design. Oh, andthe person who designed the t-shirt gets paid.
  34. 34. CROWD-SOURCE HEAVY LIFTING http://mps-expenses.guardian.co.uk/ 34Last year, the Daily Telegraph got ahold of a disk containing scans of all MP expense claims. A few days later, that same data was released underthe Freedom of Information Act. The Guardian, like other newspapers was behind the Telegraph by a few days. Rather than throwing a whole bunchof journalists (scarce resource) at the job of sifting through the documents, looking for stories, the Guardian crowdsourced that job to theiraudiences. Within a few hours, those audiences had gone through far more of the documents than journalists at any other paper, and the Guardiangot some great early scoops by creating a platform that allowed journalists and audiences to work together.
  35. 35. CUSTOMER LED SERVICE DELIVERY http://www.giffgaff.com 35GiffGaff, an 02 spin-off, is a “community run” mobile phone network. Customers are actuallypaid to respond to each other’s customer care inquiries, to help develop new serviceofferings, etc...
  36. 36. CO-CREATE CONTENT = GAIN VALUABLE INSIGHTS “Glamour Ask a Stylist” on the iTunes App Store 36This is Glamour Magazine’s “Ask a Stylist” application. Users upload a photograph of themselves, define what sort of event they are dressing for(eg. casual friday, first date, interview) and what stylist they’d like an answer from.Data:* pictures of what their audience is wearing (colour, style, age, type of clothing, etc)* which stylists are popular* which “fashion challenges” audiences faceContent:* ability to identify features of interest to audience and use of content in those features
  37. 37. 5. CHAMPION OPEN ADVOCACY (cc) http://www.flickr.com/photos/rosengrant/3982140863/ 37Open Advocacy is just as much about giving your stakeholders, audiences and consumers something to love as it is allowing them to sharethat love. Give and you shall receive.(Note RE: CC - not licensed for commercial use - have included in unpaid, informational presentations only)
  38. 38. LIKE IT? SHARE IT... http://www.centernetworks.com/victorias-secret-facebook-free-panty 38Open advocacy is all about making it possible for those who align themselves with your brand to share their affinity with their friends. VictoriaʼsSecret Lingerie turned Facebookʼs “Like” into a physical product...
  39. 39. 6. BUILD ACTIVE PARTNERSHIPS FOR THE COMMON GOOD (cc) http://www.flickr.com/photos/irievibrations/3675852330/ 39
  40. 40. CROWD-FUNDING http://www.spot.us/ 40
  41. 41. “REFRESH THE WORLD...” http://www.refresheverything.com 41PepsiRefresh is about surfacing great ideas that can change the world, with Pepsi’s help...
  42. 42. http://www.enabledbydesign.org SOLVE CHALLENGES TOGETHER 42Enabled by Design is a social business run on a not-for-profit basis for the benefit of our community.Enabled by Design was inspired by co-founder Denise Stephens experiences following her diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis in 2003. Having suffered a series of disablingrelapses and hospital admissions, Denise was assessed by an Occupational Therapist (OT) and given a range of assistive equipment to help her to be as independent aspossible. Although this equipment made a huge difference to her life, she became frustrated as her home started to look more and more like a hospital. But Denise had anidea...In April 2008, Enabled by Design was chosen to take part in the first ever Social Innovation Camp. A weekend long competition, Social Innovation Camp brings togetherpeople with ideas of how to solve specific social issues, with web developers, designers and those with business expertise to develop online solutions to real world challenges.At the end of the weekend after a Dragons Den-style pitching competition, Enabled by Design was awarded first prize as the project with most potential. The panel of judgesincluded innovation expert Charles Leadbeater, Bebo co-founder Paul Birch, Yahoo technical evangelist Christian Heilmann and head of the Young Foundations Launchpad,Simon Tucker.Since then Denise and her co-founder, Dominic Campbell, have been working hard to spread the word about Enabled by Design and get people involved to share their viewsand experiences of assistive equipment - yes, that means you!
  43. 43. 7. EMBRACE THE CHAOS (cc) http://www.flickr.com/photos/ohhector/456611804/ 43And the final behaviour of public engagement is to embrace the chaos. Be brave. Be creative. But also do things in a strategic, de-risked way. Thereare massive opportunities out there.
  44. 44. (cc) http://www.flickr.com/photos/45699481@N04/4664596482/ 44
  45. 45. dziekuje robin.hamman@edelman.com twitter: @Cybersoc http://slideshare.net/Cybersoc (cc) http://www.flickr.com/photos/45699481@N04/4664596482/ 45And the final behaviour of public engagement is to embrace the chaos. Be brave. Be creative. But also do things in a strategic, de-risked way. Thereare massive opportunities out there.

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