Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Commercial Development Regulations and Design Standards for Large Format Retail – a Smart Development Approach   By:  Chri...
Presentation Overview <ul><li>What is it we want? </li></ul><ul><li>What is the problem? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Land Supply...
Planner’s Perspective <ul><li>Educate public, property owners and development community; </li></ul><ul><li>Understand mark...
What is it we want? <ul><li>Downtowns and Main Streets  </li></ul><ul><li>Corner Stores </li></ul>Happy Valley, Oregon  re...
What is it we want? <ul><li>Better Designs </li></ul><ul><li>“ we know good design when we see it…” </li></ul>Colorado Ret...
What is it we want? <ul><li>Inexpensive commercial goods  </li></ul><ul><li>Convenience </li></ul>Beaverton, Oregon  furni...
What is the problem? <ul><li>Land Supply, too much retail </li></ul><ul><li>Retail permitted outright along Corridors in B...
What is the problem? <ul><li>Transportation system leads builders to sites with high levels of Average Daily Traffic  </li...
What is the problem? <ul><li>Lack of connection between land uses and the transportation system </li></ul>Two grocery stor...
What is the problem? <ul><li>Planning rules that don’t allow mixed use, on street parking, buildings that front the street...
Summary: What is the problem? <ul><li>What creates big box competition to Main Streets? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Auto oriente...
How to get more of what you want? <ul><li>General approaches in Oregon </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Relate retail land use design...
How to get more of what you want? <ul><li>Oregon does not have all the answers </li></ul><ul><li>Sharing photographs and e...
<ul><li>Relate retail land use designations to transportation system </li></ul>Commercial Strip with location of permitted...
<ul><li>Relate retail land use designations to transportation system </li></ul>Roadway built for auto travel and access to...
<ul><li>Relate retail land use designations to transportation system </li></ul>Roadway design to preserve road capacity, b...
<ul><li>Involve the public – educate and let them show what it is they prefer </li></ul>Public Charrette Workshop for 200 ...
<ul><li>Involve the public – educate and let them show what it is they prefer </li></ul>Preferred vision for commercial fr...
Comprehensive Planning for Centers <ul><li>Centers focus </li></ul><ul><li>Transportation Networks </li></ul><ul><li>Mixin...
Comprehensive Planning for Centers <ul><li>Planning for 12,000 acres in Damascus, Oregon </li></ul>
Remove obstacles and add appropriate standards within development codes <ul><li>Development Code “Audits” to determine wha...
How to get more of what you want? <ul><li>Specific solutions from Oregon </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Place limits on large forma...
Place limits on large format retail uses <ul><li>Limit size of retail building footprints in certain locations;  </li></ul...
Place limits on large format retail uses Cascade Station in Portland, Oregon Regulations include limited large format buil...
Protect industrial and employment areas from retail intrusion <ul><li>Metro Service District, Portland Metropolitan Servic...
Site Design Standards  <ul><li>Site layout standards </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Buildings required to front street (build to li...
Site Design Standards  <ul><li>Pedestrian vs. anti pedestrian </li></ul><ul><li>Parking in front of buildings, Beaverton, ...
Site Design Standards  <ul><li>Illustration of “pedestrian way” to parking, front doors oriented to street as opposed to p...
Building Design Standards  <ul><li>Building Design </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Building design features make a difference </li><...
Building Design Standards  <ul><li>Building design standards </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Break up large expanses with articulati...
Site and Building Design Standards  <ul><li>Gresham Station </li></ul><ul><li>Main entrance on street, façade articulation...
Parking Design Standards  <ul><li>Parking lot design standards </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Create “grid” with “streets” </li></u...
Parking Design Standards  <ul><li>Parking lot design standards </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Trees for shade, water quality and br...
More Information <ul><li>Urban Land Institute:  http://www.uli.org </li></ul><ul><li>Oregon Transportation and Growth Mana...
Photo credits <ul><li>City of Bend, Oregon, ULTRA PowerPoint presentation, Angelo Eaton & Associates, Lennertz Coyle & Ass...
Contact Information <ul><li>Chris Eaton, Principal, Eaton Planning </li></ul><ul><li>Chris Eaton has been working in land ...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Commercial Development Regulations and Design Standards for Large Format Retail

2,217 views

Published on

Examples of how planners can use regulatory tools to improve the design of big box retail development.

Published in: Education, Business, Technology
  • Be the first to comment

Commercial Development Regulations and Design Standards for Large Format Retail

  1. 1. Commercial Development Regulations and Design Standards for Large Format Retail – a Smart Development Approach By: Chris Eaton March 11, 2005 Vermont Law School 2005 Land Use Symposium Revitalizing Small Town America in an Era of Big Box Development
  2. 2. Presentation Overview <ul><li>What is it we want? </li></ul><ul><li>What is the problem? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Land Supply; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Relationship to transportation system; and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Obstacles in Development Rules </li></ul></ul><ul><li>How to get more of what you want? </li></ul><ul><li>Examples from Oregon </li></ul><ul><ul><li>General </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Link land use designations to transportation system; </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Involve the public; and </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Emphasize downtowns and centers. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Specific </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Limits on large format retail uses; </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Protections for industrial and employment areas from retail intrusion; </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Site, Building and Parking lot Design standards </li></ul></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Planner’s Perspective <ul><li>Educate public, property owners and development community; </li></ul><ul><li>Understand market forces as well as political forces; </li></ul><ul><li>Practical approaches work best, </li></ul><ul><li>Strive for “flexible certainty”; </li></ul><ul><li>Pay attention to the details! </li></ul>
  4. 4. What is it we want? <ul><li>Downtowns and Main Streets </li></ul><ul><li>Corner Stores </li></ul>Happy Valley, Oregon retail cluster Bend Oregon downtown
  5. 5. What is it we want? <ul><li>Better Designs </li></ul><ul><li>“ we know good design when we see it…” </li></ul>Colorado Retail store Vermont development
  6. 6. What is it we want? <ul><li>Inexpensive commercial goods </li></ul><ul><li>Convenience </li></ul>Beaverton, Oregon furniture store Klamath Falls, Oregon Wall Mart
  7. 7. What is the problem? <ul><li>Land Supply, too much retail </li></ul><ul><li>Retail permitted outright along Corridors in Beaverton, Oregon competing with “centers” </li></ul>
  8. 8. What is the problem? <ul><li>Transportation system leads builders to sites with high levels of Average Daily Traffic </li></ul><ul><li>Human-scale retail and transportation network face barriers </li></ul>
  9. 9. What is the problem? <ul><li>Lack of connection between land uses and the transportation system </li></ul>Two grocery stores at Arterial-Arterial intersections in Bend, Oregon
  10. 10. What is the problem? <ul><li>Planning rules that don’t allow mixed use, on street parking, buildings that front the street </li></ul>“ Streetcar stop” corner store in southeast Portland, Oregon New development in downtown Lake Oswego, Oregon
  11. 11. Summary: What is the problem? <ul><li>What creates big box competition to Main Streets? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Auto oriented market mind set (location determined by traffic count); </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Development rules based on greenfield development while hampering downtown redevelopment or mixed uses; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Change of use from industrial to retail (inexpensive land values); </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lack of market willingness to change formats; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Competition for sales tax dollars. </li></ul></ul>
  12. 12. How to get more of what you want? <ul><li>General approaches in Oregon </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Relate retail land use designations to transportation system; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Involve the public – educate and let them show what it is they prefer; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Create comprehensive plans that emphasize retail in downtowns and centers; and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Remove obstacles and add appropriate standards within development codes </li></ul></ul>
  13. 13. How to get more of what you want? <ul><li>Oregon does not have all the answers </li></ul><ul><li>Sharing photographs and experience </li></ul><ul><li>List of resources and sample regulations </li></ul>Gratuitous photo of Central Cascades Mountains (Photo: City of Bend website)
  14. 14. <ul><li>Relate retail land use designations to transportation system </li></ul>Commercial Strip with location of permitted retail (above) Beaverton, Oregon Proposed Plan changes
  15. 15. <ul><li>Relate retail land use designations to transportation system </li></ul>Roadway built for auto travel and access to retail businesses
  16. 16. <ul><li>Relate retail land use designations to transportation system </li></ul>Roadway design to preserve road capacity, but reduces access to retail businesses – change road design to change adjacent land uses
  17. 17. <ul><li>Involve the public – educate and let them show what it is they prefer </li></ul>Public Charrette Workshop for 200 participants in Bend, Oregon
  18. 18. <ul><li>Involve the public – educate and let them show what it is they prefer </li></ul>Preferred vision for commercial from ULTRA project (Bend, Oregon)
  19. 19. Comprehensive Planning for Centers <ul><li>Centers focus </li></ul><ul><li>Transportation Networks </li></ul><ul><li>Mixing uses allowed by right </li></ul><ul><li>Employment Areas with limited retail intrusion </li></ul><ul><li>Minumum residential densities </li></ul>
  20. 20. Comprehensive Planning for Centers <ul><li>Planning for 12,000 acres in Damascus, Oregon </li></ul>
  21. 21. Remove obstacles and add appropriate standards within development codes <ul><li>Development Code “Audits” to determine what should be changed prior to complete revision to code. </li></ul><ul><li>Seek community and political consensus prior to changing codes. </li></ul><ul><li>Involve advocates and developers. </li></ul>Would your code allow this development? Should these features be REQUIRED?
  22. 22. How to get more of what you want? <ul><li>Specific solutions from Oregon </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Place limits on large format retail uses; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Protect industrial and employment areas from retail intrusion; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Create locally applicable design and siting standards for large format and power shopping centers. </li></ul></ul>
  23. 23. Place limits on large format retail uses <ul><li>Limit size of retail building footprints in certain locations; </li></ul><ul><li>Map special Industrial and Employment lands (“sanctuaries”) </li></ul><ul><li>No single use retail buildings with a footprint larger than 60,000 square feet </li></ul><ul><ul><li>This allows grocery stores but not single story large format retail </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Incentive for two story retail development </li></ul></ul>City of Portland Title 33.508 Cascade Station/Portland International Center Plan District
  24. 24. Place limits on large format retail uses Cascade Station in Portland, Oregon Regulations include limited large format buildings; site layout and master planning. Uses trip allocations to address traffic impacts.
  25. 25. Protect industrial and employment areas from retail intrusion <ul><li>Metro Service District, Portland Metropolitan Service district (METRO) </li></ul><ul><li>Regional requirements for 27 local governments to limit retail in Industrial and Employment Areas </li></ul><ul><li>Metro Code 3.07.040 (also known as Title 4) This excerpt applies strictest standards for “regionally significant industrial areas” </li></ul>
  26. 26. Site Design Standards <ul><li>Site layout standards </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Buildings required to front street (build to lines instead of set back lines) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Require/encourage gateway entrances that feel like streets </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Emphasize corners with two story elements </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Photo: Dan Burden </li></ul>
  27. 27. Site Design Standards <ul><li>Pedestrian vs. anti pedestrian </li></ul><ul><li>Parking in front of buildings, Beaverton, Oregon </li></ul><ul><li>Parking on street and in blocks </li></ul><ul><li>Gresham, Oregon </li></ul>
  28. 28. Site Design Standards <ul><li>Illustration of “pedestrian way” to parking, front doors oriented to street as opposed to parking lot </li></ul>
  29. 29. Building Design Standards <ul><li>Building Design </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Building design features make a difference </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Negotiation can work with discretionary design standards </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Lakeview Village </li></ul><ul><li>Lake Oswego, Oregon </li></ul>
  30. 30. Building Design Standards <ul><li>Building design standards </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Break up large expanses with articulation and/or color </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Require menu of design features and require 4 of 12 to be included on each building </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Articulate desired local materials (stone, wood timbers) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Prohibit certain materials not acceptable locally </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Large format store in Beaverton Regional Center, Oregon </li></ul>
  31. 31. Site and Building Design Standards <ul><li>Gresham Station </li></ul><ul><li>Main entrance on street, façade articulation, pedestrian amenities like awnings </li></ul><ul><li>Gresham, Oregon </li></ul><ul><li>Safeway located at corner with parking behind, pedestrian amenities benches, awnings, main entrance at corner, </li></ul><ul><li>Portland, Oregon </li></ul>
  32. 32. Parking Design Standards <ul><li>Parking lot design standards </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Create “grid” with “streets” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Limits on amount of “block size” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Allow on-street and diagonal parking </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Raised sidewalks between parking “blocks” </li></ul></ul>
  33. 33. Parking Design Standards <ul><li>Parking lot design standards </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Trees for shade, water quality and break up large expanses; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Parking behind or beside buildings </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify primary street and “spine” streets even if private streets </li></ul></ul>
  34. 34. More Information <ul><li>Urban Land Institute: http://www.uli.org </li></ul><ul><li>Oregon Transportation and Growth Management Program: http://www.oregon.gov/LCD/TGM/index.shtml </li></ul><ul><li>City of Portland, Cascade Station: http://www.portlandonline.com/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=53362 </li></ul><ul><li>Metro Regional Government http://www.metro-region.org/ </li></ul><ul><li>Eaton Planning www.eatonplanning.com or [email_address] </li></ul>
  35. 35. Photo credits <ul><li>City of Bend, Oregon, ULTRA PowerPoint presentation, Angelo Eaton & Associates, Lennertz Coyle & Associates, Kittelson and Associates, Inc., April 2001. www.ci.bend.or.us </li></ul><ul><li>Metro Service District, 2040 Corridors Project, EcoNorthwest, Freedman Tung and Bottemly, Kittelson and Associates, Inc., Angelo Eaton & Associates, Eaton Planning. February 2005. </li></ul><ul><li>City of Portland, Oregon, Draft Concept Plan for Cascade Station Development, January 2005. </li></ul><ul><li>Project for Public Spaces: http://www.pps.org/ ; Dan Burden photographer </li></ul><ul><li>Ten Principles for Reinventing America’s Suburban Strip, Strip, Urban Land Institute, 2003. </li></ul>
  36. 36. Contact Information <ul><li>Chris Eaton, Principal, Eaton Planning </li></ul><ul><li>Chris Eaton has been working in land use planning and real estate development for 17 years. She consults on a variety of projects for public, non-profit and private clients. Removing obstacles to Smart Development in local development codes and revising codes and comprehensive plans is one of her specialties. As a facilitator for over 20 development code and growth management projects, she is an expert at translating technical information for Advisory Committees and the general public. Chris has also prepared and managed complex development projects for private clients, led natural resource policy discussions for riparian protection and low impact development as well as technical land capacity analysis projects. </li></ul><ul><li>In 1999, she co-founded and led Angelo Eaton & Associates, Inc. (AEA) and grew the firm to 8 FTE with annual revenues of $1 Million in 5 years. In 2003 AEA won Employer of the Year from the Portland Chapter of Women’s Transportation Seminar (WTS). Chris was a citizen member on the Metro Transportation Policy Alternatives Committee, served as a board member of the Oregon Chapter of the American Planning Association for two terms, organized and coordinated the annual Oregon Planning Institute for 7 years, and founded the Intern Scholarship fund at Portland State University School of Urban Planning. She has spoken numerous times at conferences and forums on a variety of topics, including ways to improve development codes to remove obstacles for Smart Development. </li></ul><ul><li>Chris Eaton, AICP </li></ul><ul><li>Lexington, Massachusetts 02421 </li></ul><ul><li>Office: 781-210-0982 </li></ul><ul><li>Cell: 781-454-9588 </li></ul><ul><li>Fax: 781-658-2621 </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>www.eatonplanning.com </li></ul>

×