AgWA Definition of a Country Support Tool (CST) - Andy Bullock

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AgWA Definition of a Country Support Tool (CST) - Andy Bullock

  1. 1. CTA Annual Seminar Public Policy and Investment 24th November, 2010 Andy Bullock
  2. 2. The main foci for action to 2015: supporting AWM operations and investments in 20 Post-Compact countries (significant expansion of AWM, ‘next generation’ Ag SWAPs/irrigation policies) Countries (perhaps indicatively 5-10) progressing to Compacts (alignments of AWM within national development and agricultural strategies, effective national irrigation policies and strategies, and AWM with food security policies working with CAADP to support (perhaps indicatively 5-10) countries that will progress towards, but not necessarily conclude on, Compacts Low Income Countries Under Stress (LICUS)
  3. 3. TerrAfrica ‘Equivalent’ community of practice under Pillar I Aimed at scaling up Sustainable Land Management Country Support Tool (CST)
  4. 4. a) Overall demand for support is high b) Better narrative on AWM connections to Nat. Devt. Plans and SWAPs c) Institutional roles and responsibilities can be clearer d) Business case for public investments - benefit from renewal of messages of the economic and social benefits (returns to society, returns to Govt) e) AWM can be differentiated by ‘Business Lines’ f) Very strong case for Implementation Manuals to simplify operational practices for main AWM business lines g) More can be got from existing delivery mechanisms h) High value in pre-investment planning in advance of partner engagement i) Broader base of support services can be brought to bear (civ soc, priv sector) j) AWM connections within river basins are important and relevant, but not whole story (eg regional food markets, economic spillovers) Operationally-oriented, linked to ongoing thrusts. With improving investment flows, redress low sector performance
  5. 5. Different beneficiary targets, political economies, financing models etc 1) improved water control and watershed management in a rain-fed environment 2) small scale community-managed irrigation for local markets; 3) individual smallholder irrigation for high value markets; 4) market oriented (medium-large scale) irrigation on a public private partnership basis 5) reform and modernization of existing large scale irrigation; and
  6. 6. A collective Vision for AWM in Africa, endorsed by AUC aimed at high-level political messages to the global development community through 6th World Water Forum at Marseille, 2012. 1. Strong, positive messages on benefits of market-led, value-chain AWM in economic and agricultural growth and poverty reduction to national development 2. A summary of high-level declarations and commitments (and targets) 3. ‘Principles of engagement’ – financing principles (public, fiduciary) 4. Operationalisaing AWM through CAADP 6. Delivery mechanisms (CAADP, AMCOW’s follow-up on Regional Position Paper, African Water Facility, Climate for Development in Africa (ClimDev- Africa), the Africa Infrastructure Country Diagnostic (AICD/ICA), Program for Infrastructure Development in Africa (PIDA)
  7. 7. CEOT – I (First-order consolidation): Oriented through AgWA website a) online access to (indicatively) 10-15 principal AWM documents b) online access to (indicatively) 30-50 existing tools (guidelines, best practices, knowledge synopses etc), organised by the five principal business lines, as multi-partner contributions. CEOT – II (Maximising value of existing tools): Outputs within 6 months, aimed at dissemination as well as, but not limited, to the AgWA website: c) Briefing notes: • 5 Business lines • Recommendations from Collaborative Program • Cross-pIllar connections (Pillar II-IV) d) 15-20 ‘best prospects’ tools – improving uptake value e) Increasing web-based organisation of existing tools by country f) Improved on-line access to Partners ongoing AWM investment activities g) Information note (aimed at Ministers, Ps, Director level) – Existing Funds and Facilities
  8. 8. CEOT – I (First-order consolidation): Oriented through AgWA website a) online access to (indicatively) 10-15 principal AWM documents b) online access to (indicatively) 30-50 existing tools (guidelines, best practices, knowledge synopses etc), organised by the five principal business lines, as multi-partner contributions. CEOT – II (Maximising value of existing tools): Outputs within 6 months, aimed at dissemination as well as, but not limited, to the AgWA website: c) Briefing notes: • 5 Business lines • Recommendations from Collaborative Program • Cross-pIllar connections (Pillar II-IV) d) 15-20 ‘best prospects’ tools – improving uptake value e) Increasing web-based organisation of existing tools by country f) Improved on-line access to Partners ongoing AWM investment activities g) Information note (aimed at Ministers, Ps, Director level) – Existing Funds and Facilities
  9. 9. A. Pre-investment Framework B. ‘Business Line’ Implementation Manuals C. Investment Roadmap Framework D. M&E Policy stock-take and diagnosis Policy and strategy support plan Implementation Manuals of norms and standards Government statement of investment package (active and pipeline interventions) M&E in support of the ReSAKSS system Annual AWM Report to AUC Accompanying measures Best practice ‘Technology’ Manuals Project Preparation Pipeline Elaboration of ‘Business Lines’ Stages of the investment cycle Independent scorecard of ‘investment readiness’ Guideline documents for principal irrigation technologies Rolling ‘basket’ of most viable investments under preparation
  10. 10. Policy Stock-take and Diagnosis - country-level (within a 1-2 month period), largely through consultative processes and multi-partner engagement Investment readiness score-card (‘traffic-light’ based) Policy and Strategy Support Plan – further steps on policy/strategy reform (as supplements) - addressing gaps identified through the Policy Stock-take and diagnosis
  11. 11. The Implementation Manuals would target scaling-up of delivery to farmers - with improved performance (maximum impact), cost efficiencies etc National norms and standards to flow from •Evaluations and Mid-Term Reviews •Safeguards •Lessons-learned •Success/failure stories from the field •Research uptake opportunities Manuals also to frame AWM Business lines within their own setting of agricultural development, scaling-up opportunities, financial viability and sustainability, service provision, institutional roles … Aim to overcome multiplicity of separate Project Manuals (which can vary between projects, donors and implementing partners) - proliferation of approach
  12. 12. Rolling biennial document at national level Active and immediate pipeline investments and overall Finance Strategy (PubEx in CapEx, O&M, etc) Project Preparation Pipeline, ‘most viable’ projects emerging from pre-investment assessments (economic and technical feasibility, safeguard compliance, etc)
  13. 13. The recommendations from AgWA M&E Review. Two ‘most viable’ routes: • Boosting the AWM content of the existing ReSAKSS M&E system of CAADP , or • A significant and substantial evolution of AQUASTAT. New ‘draft results monitoring matrix for AWM in Africa’, proposed by that Report. Recommends 20 core indicators within a framework. Annual report to AUC on progress (CAADP/AMCOW)
  14. 14. a) Partnership building through AgWA’s sub-regional networks: wider coalition of expertise b) Capacity needs assessment, with initial focus on increasing absorptive capacities in lead operational organisations c) Curriculum of learning events for greater effectiveness d) AWM champions
  15. 15. 1. Vision of Agricultural Water Management in Africa (Vision) – target 6th World Water Forum – Investment case and principles of engagement 2. Consolidation of Existing Operational Tools (CEOT) – ‘rapid and urgent’, within 3-6 months; primarily aimed (in the first instance) at Post-Compact countries 3. Country Investment Tool (CIT) - aimed at supporting countries in their investment operations in both Post- and Pre-Compact situations; 6-18 month timescale 4. Capacity strengthening (CS) - aimed at improving absorptive capacity over a five-year timescale; initial ocus on first 12 months.

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