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Ccca labeling102 draft

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Ccca labeling102 draft

  1. 1. Artifact Labeling 102 <ul><li>Presented by Emily Phillips and Carolyn Frisa from the Collections Care and Conservation Alliance </li></ul> 
  2. 2. <ul><li>allows you to maintain inventory control of your collections </li></ul>Why label artifacts in your historical society or museum? <ul><li>can provide some security in the event of theft or other disaster </li></ul><ul><li>the label acts as the physical connection between </li></ul><ul><li>the artifact and its documentation and any other </li></ul><ul><li>relevant information </li></ul>
  3. 3. Questions to consider when developing a labeling policy: <ul><li>Are labeling procedures part of your collections </li></ul><ul><li>management policy? If not, is it written down </li></ul><ul><li>anywhere? </li></ul><ul><li>Who makes the decisions about labeling in your </li></ul><ul><li>institution? </li></ul><ul><li>When is the best time to label artifacts already in your collection? What about new acquisitions? </li></ul><ul><li>Are the labeling materials safe to use for the </li></ul><ul><li>person who is handling them? Are any health and </li></ul><ul><li>safety precautions necessary? Are they easy to </li></ul><ul><li>use? </li></ul>
  4. 4. Where should you put the label? General Precautions <ul><li>don’t write on the front of artifact - this is more </li></ul><ul><li>common than you might think! </li></ul><ul><li>don’t place adhesive labels directly on the artifact. </li></ul><ul><li>Avoid marking on or near areas of damage such as </li></ul><ul><li>tears, chips, abrasions, cracks, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t write on the base of objects. This causes unnecessary handling and the labels can rub off. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Sometimes it isn’t safe or possible to place the label directly on the artifact. Whenever you are dealing with potentially complicated artifacts, it is always best to consult a conservator first. CCCA has objects, paintings, and paper conservators who can help answer these questions. Insect specimens with paper labels and pins. Natural history specimens with water-resistant labels and permanent ink.
  6. 6. Don’t forget to add extra labels when the object is in storage. Adding extra labels to housing enclosures and to the artifacts in storage can dramatically reduce unnecessary handling and wasted time searching for an artifact. Add digital photos when possible. Paper tag with pencil number on sword handle. Digital photo printed on Permadur on outside of pamphlet box. Label printed on Permadur in Melinex sleeve on outside of document box.
  7. 7. What is the right type of label for the artifact? Different types of artifacts require different types of labels. Labels can be tied or sewn to the artifact. Labels can be applied to the artifact on top of a barrier coat. Sometimes labels can be written on the housing enclosures only.
  8. 8. <ul><li>Do’s </li></ul><ul><li>Label each textile individually. </li></ul><ul><li>Do use twill tape labeled marked with pencil. </li></ul><ul><li>Stitch cotton tape to artifact with only 1 or 2 stitches at each end. </li></ul><ul><li>Use white cotton thread for and a small gauge needle. </li></ul><ul><li>Label textiles in the same place for each type. </li></ul><ul><li>example: stitch label onto the lower right corner on the back of flat textiles </li></ul><ul><li>Don’ts </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t just label one part (i.e only one glove in a pair). </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t write directly on the fabric, especially with pens or inks. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t create unnecessary stitches. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t use colored threads unless they are known to be stable. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t adhere adhesive labels to textiles  staining will occur and the adhesive can damage fibers. </li></ul>Guidelines for Labeling Textiles
  9. 9. Unbleached white cotton twill tape is ideal. It is available from conservation suppliers and costs approximately $13 for a 72 yard roll. It can also be used for tying labels onto other types of objects. Thread and needles can be obtained from a local fabric store. B pencils can be found at art supply stores. White Cotton Twill Tape White cotton thread and needle. Materials for Labeling Textiles “ B” graphite pencils
  10. 10. <ul><li>Do’s </li></ul><ul><li>Label each object individually. </li></ul><ul><li>If there are pieces that can be easily detached, make sure these are also labeled. </li></ul><ul><li>Do apply a barrier resin (B-67 or B-72 in acetone) to the object prior to applying the label. </li></ul><ul><li>Use Micron pigma pens to write labels or print labels on acid-free, buffered papers such as Permadur. </li></ul><ul><li>Label objects in the same place for each type. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’ts </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t just label one part. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t write directly on the object. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t use metal-nibbed pens or quills  they will irreversibly scratch or mar the surface. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t use barriers or inks that have not been tested by conservators (i.e. nail polish, permanent markers, etc.). </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t adhere adhesive labels to objects. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t use colored inks (black only). </li></ul>Guidelines for Labeling Objects – glass, metals, ceramics and other inorganic materials
  11. 11. Pre-mixed barriers (lacquers) are available from conservation suppliers and cost around $8.00 and are come in clear and opaque white with brush applicators. These can be used with pencils or pigma pens. Labels can also be printed on acid- and lignin-free paper (available from conservation suppliers) and adhered with the B-72 while wet. For written labels, a barrier coat should be applied first and allowed to dry. A second top coat should be applied after the numbers have dried. Clear and Opaque White B-72 Lacquer in Acetone Printed paper labels. Micron Pigma Pens - Black Materials for Labeling Objects – glass, metals, ceramics and other inorganic materials
  12. 12. <ul><li>Do’s </li></ul><ul><li>Label each object individually. </li></ul><ul><li>Do attach paper labels with soft cotton thread. </li></ul><ul><li>Use pencils or Micron pigma pens to write labels or print labels on acid-free, buffered papers such as Permadur. </li></ul><ul><li>Label objects in the same place for each type. </li></ul><ul><li>Label the outside of all housing materials. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’ts </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t just label one part. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t write directly on the object. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t use barrier layers (lacquers) because they contain potentially harmful solvents. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t use pens inks that have not been tested by conservators (permanent markers, etc.). </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t adhere adhesive labels to objects. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t use colored inks (black only). </li></ul>Guidelines for Labeling Objects – rubber, leather, wood, feathers and organic materials
  13. 13. Archival tag kits are available from conservation suppliers and offer a safe and easy to apply labeling system. A pack of 100 tags costs from approximately $15 to $25 depending upon the size of the tag. Acid- and lignin-free tags with cotton ties “ B” graphite pencils & black pigma pens Materials for Labeling Objects – rubber, leather, wood, feathers and organic materials Printed paper labels.
  14. 14. <ul><li>Do’s </li></ul><ul><li>Do write on the reverse of the paper artifact. </li></ul><ul><li>Use a soft ‘B’ pencil and do not press down when writing. </li></ul><ul><li>Label paper artifacts in the same place on the reverse. </li></ul><ul><li>Do label secondary supports and framing materials (mats, mounts, backings). </li></ul><ul><li>Do label the outside of all housing materials, including boxes, folders, and frames. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’ts </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t write on the front of the paper artifact. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t use mechanical pencils or hard pencils. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t use pens or inks of any kind. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t use barrier layers (lacquers) because they contain potentially harmful solvents. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t adhere adhesive labels to paper artifacts. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t clip or staple labels to paper artifacts. </li></ul>Guidelines for Labeling Paper-Based Artifacts
  15. 15. Only soft “B” graphite pencils should be used for marking paper. Write gently to avoid leaving a permanent impression. Labeling kits for boxes are available from conservation suppliers in a variety of sizes. For example a set of 100 2.5” x 3.75” labels costs approximately $15.00. You can add digital images and text and then print hem on a laser printer. Or you can print your own labels on acid-free, buffered paper. “ B” graphite pencils Printed labels and Melinex sleeves for boxes. Printed paper label with digital image. Materials for Labeling Paper-Based Artifacts
  16. 16. <ul><li>Do’s </li></ul><ul><li>Do provide each painting with a label(s). </li></ul><ul><li>Apply a label to the backing board. This can be written on the board directly with a soft ‘B’ pencil. </li></ul><ul><li>Apply a paper tag with a cotton string to the framing hardware. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’ts </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t write on directly on the front or back of the painting. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t write directly on the frame. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t use pens or inks of any kind. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t use barrier layers (lacquers) because they contain potentially harmful solvents. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t adhere adhesive labels to the painting or framing materials. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t use metal wire to attach the paper tags. </li></ul>Guidelines for Labeling Paintings
  17. 17. Only soft “B” graphite pencils should be used for marking the labels. Archival tag kits are available from conservation suppliers and offer a safe and easy to apply labeling system. Or you can print your own labels on acid-free, buffered paper and attach them with cotton thread. “ B” graphite pencils Acid- and lignin-free tags with cotton ties Materials for Labeling Paintings
  18. 18. <ul><li>Material </li></ul><ul><li>acid-free, chemically inert labels, tags, paper, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Acryloid B-72 and B-76 (premixed in acetone) </li></ul><ul><li>Twill cotton tape </li></ul><ul><li>“ B” graphite pencils, small (000-000) brushes, Pigma pens </li></ul><ul><li>Glide dental floss or 5-ply natural cotton twine </li></ul><ul><li>Small gauge needle and white cotton thread </li></ul><ul><li>Suppliers </li></ul><ul><li>Gaylord, Light Impressions, Talas, University Products </li></ul><ul><li>Gaylord, Talas, University Products </li></ul><ul><li>Gaylord, Talas, University Products </li></ul><ul><li>Talas, local art supply stores </li></ul><ul><li>Local drugstores or hardware stores </li></ul><ul><li>Local fabric store </li></ul>List of Suppliers for Labeling Materials
  19. 19. Collections Care and Conservation Alliance <ul><li>Working together to care for New England’s cultural collections </li></ul>  collectionscare@gmail.com Tel. (802)428-4188 www.collectionscarealliance.wordpress.com and be sure to find us on Facebook

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