National Youth Program: Growing the Human
Rights Movement in the US
Cynthia Carrion
National Youth Programs Coordinator AI...
WHO WE ARE
 A global movement
 more than 3 million supporters, members and activists
 in more than 150 countries and te...
Amnesty International Youth Strategy 2010-2016 Vision
More young people
respect and uphold
human rights value
The rights o...
National
networks
International
youth coordinator
West
Africa Asia
Pacific
Euro
International
Secretariat
Global youth
adv...
“requires the full enjoyment by young people of all human
rights and fundamental freedoms, and also requires that
Governme...
Global Landscape
Human Rights in the US: FromHuman Rights in the US: From
Schools to the StreetsSchools to the Streets
How Many Schools are there in the US?
 As of 2010 according to the U.S. Department of Education, National Center for
Educ...
“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can
change the world; indeed, it's the only thing that e...
Amnesty USA Youth as MobilizersAmnesty USA Youth as Mobilizers
Drawing inspiration from our youth activists
 Organized school, state and national
actions.
 Lobbied elected officials a...
How are we doing
this?
*Field Organizers
(FO) – Rock!
•Student Activist
Coordinators
(SACs)
•National Youth
Program (NYP)
Snowflake Model in action:
What you can do!What you can do!
Our Efforts So Far
 Designing new registration promotion materials
 Contacting “phantom groups”
 Individually calling r...
Goals
 500 groups by the end of the
summer
 650 groups by the end of this
year
 1000 groups in next 1-2 years
Members o...
Staff Alma Maters: We Need Groups!
Brown University
(Jiva Manske)
NYU
(Danielle Gorshein)
Notre Dame
(Justin Mazzola)
Amer...
Challenges Addressed in Strategic Plan
 Half of members and supporters are older than 55 BUT youth
group registration ca...
Registration Push
OUR PITCH:
Develop leadership skills
Gain vital work experience and
qualifications for your future car...
2014 Registration: Where We Are Now
 Currently 279 school groups registered- compared to 148 this time last
year.
 Top s...
What You Can Do:
 Reach out to your high school and
college about starting a group.
 Reach out to teacher/administrator
...
Questions & Ideas?
We want to hear from you!
THANK YOU!
Register:
www.amnestyusa.org/register
Follow us:
Twitter @AIUSAyouth
Facebook @AmnestyYouth
National Youth Program Registration Strategy Powerpoint from June 18th All-Staff Meeting
National Youth Program Registration Strategy Powerpoint from June 18th All-Staff Meeting
National Youth Program Registration Strategy Powerpoint from June 18th All-Staff Meeting
National Youth Program Registration Strategy Powerpoint from June 18th All-Staff Meeting
National Youth Program Registration Strategy Powerpoint from June 18th All-Staff Meeting
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National Youth Program Registration Strategy Powerpoint from June 18th All-Staff Meeting

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  • Ever since we started campaigning in 1961, we’ve worked around the globe to stop the abuse of human rights. Amnesty International began with one man’s outrage and his courage to do something about it. After learning of two Portuguese students imprisoned for raising a toast to freedom in 1961, British lawyer Peter Benenson published an article, “The Forgotten Prisoners” in the Observer newspaper. 
That article launched the “Appeal for Amnesty 1961”, a worldwide campaign that provoked a remarkable response. Reprinted in newspapers across the world, his call to action resonated with the values and aspirations of people everywhere. This was the genesis of Amnesty International.
  • How do we get there? The IS created an international youth strategy, we have our section goals and this is what alignment looks like. ENGAGEMENT Increase student group registrations and membership by 20% over 5 years. Increase youth engagement through current and to be developed youth based trainings and spaces where youth can learn, participate and inform HR agenda each year Support youth specific online platforms and print resources for getting involved. Identify 1 to 5 universities per states/region that serve as anchors for student and community activism. Youth members and group reflect the diversity of USA ACTIVISM Sharing and furthering AIUSA’s agenda on local campuses Creating campaign specific materials and strategies for youth Peer-to-Peer training and mentorship Partnerships at national level ACTIVE PARTCIPATION Increase opportunities for Youth Leadership Dynamic spaces for youth collaboration and planning are created and supported. Regional and campaign based youth action teams to support regional offices in their work and engagement with youth. PROTECTION Campaigns identify youth specific cases that empower AIUSA to take action Youth emphasis included in country work Increasing opportunities for AIUSA youth to partner with other human rights youth movement
  • Salil Shetty joined Amnesty International as the organization’s eighth Secretary General in July 2010. A long-term activist on poverty and justice, Salil Shetty leads the movement's worldwide work to end the abuse of human rights. Since his student days, when a state of emergency was declared in 1976, and as the President of his college student’s union, Salil Shetty has been actively campaigning against the curtailment of human rights. Prior to joining Amnesty International, Salil Shetty was Director of the United Nations Millennium Campaign from 2003 to 2010 Young people integrated at every level, as volunteers, interns, staff, members, activists, communications strategists
  • 90% live in the developing world where they tend to make a large proportion of the population. The US State Department recently created a office – Global Office of youth issues. Special Adviser to the Secretary of State Global Youth Issues. (Ronan Farrow and now Zeenat Rahman)
  • Interesting fact: During most of the last century, the trend to consolidate small schools brought declines in the total number of public schools in the United States. In 1929–30, there were approximately 248,000 public schools, compared with about 99,000 in 2009–10. There is no national standard in the US for Human Rights or National Ciriculum, there are a handful of states that have it mentioned in their state standards.
  • Take a moment to think about what success could look like for 2016 with a strong youth activism base. - Could we be closer to closing Guantanamo, ending the death penalty, holding governments and corporations accountable for human rights violations?
  • A few staff alma maters with really active: UC Berkeley, Hunter College, what others do you know of?!
  • National Youth Program Registration Strategy Powerpoint from June 18th All-Staff Meeting

    1. 1. National Youth Program: Growing the Human Rights Movement in the US Cynthia Carrion National Youth Programs Coordinator AIUSA Tuesday June 18, 2013
    2. 2. WHO WE ARE  A global movement  more than 3 million supporters, members and activists  in more than 150 countries and territories  Since 1961 - campaign to end grave abuses of human rights Vision: for every person to enjoy all the rights enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and other international human rights standards. We are independent of any government, political ideology, economic interest or religion and are funded mainly by our membership and public donations.
    3. 3. Amnesty International Youth Strategy 2010-2016 Vision More young people respect and uphold human rights value The rights of more young people are protected Young people will be empowered with skills, knowledge, experience and opportunities to actively participate in civil society decision making and social change processes. More young people take action within their local communities and in the global community to protect and promote HRs Young people are protected, inspired and empowered to play an active role in creating a world where everybody enjoys human rights
    4. 4. National networks International youth coordinator West Africa Asia Pacific Euro International Secretariat Global youth advisory group International Council Meeting 65 national youth networks with national youth focal points Regional youth initiatives Globally connected through human rights campaigns Structure of youth work in Amnesty International International e-activists
    5. 5. “requires the full enjoyment by young people of all human rights and fundamental freedoms, and also requires that Governments take effective action against violations of these rights and freedoms.” WORLD PROGRAMME OF ACTION ON YOUTH
    6. 6. Global Landscape
    7. 7. Human Rights in the US: FromHuman Rights in the US: From Schools to the StreetsSchools to the Streets
    8. 8. How Many Schools are there in the US?  As of 2010 according to the U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. (2012), servicing Elementary and Secondary  98,817 Public Schools  33,000 Private Schools Higher Education*  About 7,000 *In fall 2012, a record 21.6 million students are expected to attend American colleges and universities.
    9. 9. “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it's the only thing that ever has.” –Margaret Mead Fordham University Rice University University of Florida College of Charleston University of Tennessee Duke University Montclair High School Goucher College New York University Colby College Tufts University UC Berkeley Sentinel High School University of Washington Los Altos High School UC Davis Beverly Hills High School Arizona State University Colorado College Austin College
    10. 10. Amnesty USA Youth as MobilizersAmnesty USA Youth as Mobilizers
    11. 11. Drawing inspiration from our youth activists  Organized school, state and national actions.  Lobbied elected officials at local capitals and in DC for human rights.  Authored Op-ed articles, are making the news and making an impact.  Many former AIUSA student leaders are now serving on the board, Road Scholars, Valedictorians and are on Amnesty staff.
    12. 12. How are we doing this? *Field Organizers (FO) – Rock! •Student Activist Coordinators (SACs) •National Youth Program (NYP)
    13. 13. Snowflake Model in action:
    14. 14. What you can do!What you can do!
    15. 15. Our Efforts So Far  Designing new registration promotion materials  Contacting “phantom groups”  Individually calling registered groups to encourage re-registration  Registering groups at AGM  Contacting faculty advisors to develop network and share best practices.
    16. 16. Goals  500 groups by the end of the summer  650 groups by the end of this year  1000 groups in next 1-2 years Members of Amnesty Colby rally an audience for Jamnesty
    17. 17. Staff Alma Maters: We Need Groups! Brown University (Jiva Manske) NYU (Danielle Gorshein) Notre Dame (Justin Mazzola) American University (Sarah Burke) Vassar College (Elise Carlson Lewis) These are just a few examples: at least 20 staff members have alma maters without groups!
    18. 18. Challenges Addressed in Strategic Plan  Half of members and supporters are older than 55 BUT youth group registration can garner a new and younger base of AIUSA supporters.  Membership fell 20% from 2007-2010 BUT youth who become involved with Amnesty early on will likely stay involved with Amnesty. Increasing youth membership is ESSENTIAL.
    19. 19. Registration Push OUR PITCH: Develop leadership skills Gain vital work experience and qualifications for your future career Work alongside human rights professionals and inspiring youth activists Opportunities to travel, attend conferences, briefings, and internships with Amnesty Your impact is real and immediate so start now!
    20. 20. 2014 Registration: Where We Are Now  Currently 279 school groups registered- compared to 148 this time last year.  Top states: New York (43), Illinois (20), California (17), and Massachusetts (14).  9 states without registered Amnesty groups (Alaska, Kansas, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, North Dakota, South Dakota, Tennessee, Wyoming)  For the first time, more colleges than high schools registered.  Efforts underway: working with educators, training more SACs, more visibility for recruitment.
    21. 21. What You Can Do:  Reach out to your high school and college about starting a group.  Reach out to teacher/administrator contacts.  Use other AIUSA events as an opportunity for student group recruitment.  Reach out to us if you need materials or information for registration. Students from across the state of Texas gather for an Amnesty training
    22. 22. Questions & Ideas? We want to hear from you!
    23. 23. THANK YOU! Register: www.amnestyusa.org/register Follow us: Twitter @AIUSAyouth Facebook @AmnestyYouth

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