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CENTER FOR AMERICAN PROGRESS
CIVIC AND POLITICAL HEALTH OF THE NATION STUDY, 2006
RECRUITING AND RETAINING THE NEXT GENERATION OF NONPROFIT SECTOR LEADERSHIP, NYU WAGNER SCHOOL OF PUBLIC SERVICE, 2004
CIRCLE, 2006
FACEBOOK, JULY 2007 USA TODAY , NOVEMBER 3, 2005
<ul><li>New kinds of leadership are needed for an age defined more and more by diversity and participation </li></ul><ul><...
 
 
 
Today’s leaders should Look like  America will look Connect  across cultures   Facilitate  collaborative action   Recogniz...
Our social impact:
Allies   are placed in 10-month paid apprenticeships   in nonprofit organizations where they: <ul><li>serve at least four ...
Allies   engage in a rigorous leadership development curriculum  delivered by community leaders, practitioners  and educat...
<ul><li>Allies are   homegrown and more diverse  than other service and leadership programs </li></ul><ul><li>Allies are  ...
Public Allies partners   with  local universities and nonprofit organizations .   These partnerships  build  local capacit...
Recognized… by the Bush and Clinton administrations as a model for national service Respected… as a source of best practic...
Public Allies has created a  scalable, sustainable program model  with a track record for impact THIS IS   OUR   MOMENT Th...
Allies are very diverse.  More than 67% are people of color, 60% are women, 50% college graduates and 15% LGBT. More than ...
Public Allies 2,818 Alumni  demonstrate how we are changing the face and practice of leadership. We continue to engage and...
 
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Public Allies 2010

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Introduction to Public Allies

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Public Allies 2010

  1. 4. CENTER FOR AMERICAN PROGRESS
  2. 5. CIVIC AND POLITICAL HEALTH OF THE NATION STUDY, 2006
  3. 6. RECRUITING AND RETAINING THE NEXT GENERATION OF NONPROFIT SECTOR LEADERSHIP, NYU WAGNER SCHOOL OF PUBLIC SERVICE, 2004
  4. 7. CIRCLE, 2006
  5. 8. FACEBOOK, JULY 2007 USA TODAY , NOVEMBER 3, 2005
  6. 9. <ul><li>New kinds of leadership are needed for an age defined more and more by diversity and participation </li></ul><ul><li>Civic engagement is lowest in diverse communities because people don’t know how to work together </li></ul><ul><li>Nonprofit organizations struggle to recruit, engage, and develop the next generation </li></ul><ul><li>The Millennial generation wants to get involved but don’t know where to start </li></ul>OUR COMMUNITIES, COUNTRY AND WORLD ARE CHANGING RAPIDLY US Census Bureau Report: August 8, 2008 Winograd and Hais: Millenial Makeover, Rutgers University Press, 2008 Robert Putnam, Harvard University: E Pluribus Unum: Diversity and Community in the 21 st Century , 2007 The Bridgespan Group: The Nonprofit Sector’s Leadership Deficit, 2006 Kim, Kunreuther, and Rodriguez: Working Across Generations: Defining the Future of Nonprofit Leadership, Wiley, 2008 Paul Light, NYU: In Search of Public Service, 2004 Shelly Cryer, NYU: Next Generation of Nonprofit Sector Leadership, 2004
  7. 13. Today’s leaders should Look like America will look Connect across cultures Facilitate collaborative action Recognize and mobilize community assets Commit to self-development Be accountable for impact
  8. 14. Our social impact:
  9. 15. Allies are placed in 10-month paid apprenticeships in nonprofit organizations where they: <ul><li>serve at least four days per week </li></ul><ul><li>create, improve and expand services that address diverse issues, including youth development, education, public health, economic development and the environment </li></ul><ul><li>earn a monthly stipend of $1,500.00 </li></ul><ul><li>receive healthcare, childcare, student loan deferment and a post-service education award of $5,350 </li></ul>
  10. 16. Allies engage in a rigorous leadership development curriculum delivered by community leaders, practitioners and educators. This program includes: <ul><li>intensive skills training </li></ul><ul><li>personal coaching </li></ul><ul><li>critical feedback and reflection </li></ul><ul><li>community building </li></ul><ul><li>team projects </li></ul><ul><li>personal presentations of learning </li></ul>
  11. 17. <ul><li>Allies are homegrown and more diverse than other service and leadership programs </li></ul><ul><li>Allies are committed to careers in service </li></ul><ul><li>Public Allies expands and improves services at a wide range of nonprofits </li></ul><ul><li>Public Allies’ leadership curriculum is at the cutting edge of leadership theory and practice </li></ul><ul><li>Public Allies does service with communities , not to communities </li></ul><ul><li>Public Allies is cost-effective and leverages a huge ROI </li></ul>Public Allies’ core innovation has been our citizen-centered, values-based approach to leadership Our approach to national service and leadership development is distinct from other programs
  12. 18. Public Allies partners with local universities and nonprofit organizations . These partnerships build local capacity, strengthen management, deliver consistent program quality, leverage trusted brands, and streamline costs. We will have 656 young leaders serving in 21 communities in Fall 2011 Our operating partners American Sunrise ( San Antonio ) Arizona State University School of Nonprofit Leadership and Management Bay Area Community Resources ( Silicon Valley + San Francisco) BRIDGES ( Cincinnati ) Community Development Technologies Center ( Los Angeles ) Coro Center for Civic Leadership ( Pittsburgh ) Eagle Rock School and Professional Development Center ( Estes Park ) Indianapolis Neighborhood Resource Center New Mexico Forum for Youth and Community Development North Carolina Central University School of Public Administration (Raleigh-Durham) RYASAP ( Connecticut ) University of Delaware Center for Community Service and Research University of Maryland- Baltimore School of Public Administration University of Wisconsin Milwaukee School of Continuing Education Public Allies operates our New York, Chicago and Washington DC sites. Family Services Metro Orlando Central Florida Pillsbury United Communities Twin Cities/Minneapolis-St. Paul
  13. 19. Recognized… by the Bush and Clinton administrations as a model for national service Respected… as a source of best practices for leadership development, community engagement and evaluation for the field; the first AmeriCorps grantee to be contracted as a trainer for all other AmeriCorps grantees
  14. 20. Public Allies has created a scalable, sustainable program model with a track record for impact THIS IS OUR MOMENT The bi-partisan Edward M. Kennedy Serve America Act will more than triple AmeriCorps, and create opportunity for Public Allies to scale Public Allies has been supported by the last three Presidential Administrations and our visibility is increasing rapidly because of our history with the Obamas Of all the jobs I’ve had, if I were ever to do anything again at the drop of a heartbeat, it would be to work at Public Allies. I was really passionate and engaged; it was like a family. I was never happier in my life than when I was working to build Public Allies. First Lady Michelle Obama
  15. 21. Allies are very diverse. More than 67% are people of color, 60% are women, 50% college graduates and 15% LGBT. More than 90% of Partner Organizations every year have reported that Allies met or exceeded their goals and expectations Over 90% of Allies demonstrate significant gains in leadership skills and self confidence Nonprofits hosting an Ally saved over $20,000 as compared to what it would cost to do the same work without Public Allies. Nationally, Allies will save nonprofits more than $12 million this year Received the Pew Center for Civic Change’s prestigious Civic Change Award in 2006 and Fast Company Social Capitalist Award in 2008. Best Practices honored by McKinsey & Company, Bridgespan Group, Cisco, AmeriCorps, and others. RESULTS
  16. 22. Public Allies 2,818 Alumni demonstrate how we are changing the face and practice of leadership. We continue to engage and support this network, investing in those best positioned to make the biggest impact . WE DEVELOP AND SUPPORT AN ACTIVE AND GROWING FORCE FOR SOCIAL IMPACT More than 80% of Public Allies graduates have continued careers in nonprofit and public service . Their level of civic, political, and volunteer activity more than doubles their age cohort. In 1999, Giselle John aged out of foster care into Public Allies New York. Through Public Allies, she worked to empower youth in the foster care system, and afterward completed her BA at John Jay College. She is now a consultant with The Annie E. Casey Foundation working to reform foster care systems in counties in three states. In 1994, while serving as a Public Ally in Washington, D.C., Paul Griffin started City at Peace, which has increased student achievement among 2,000 diverse teens through a program that links arts, service, and tutoring in 7 US cities, Israel and South Africa.

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