• Like
  • Save
The Pedagogical Patterns Collector User Guide
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

The Pedagogical Patterns Collector User Guide

on

  • 2,132 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
2,132
Views on SlideShare
1,933
Embed Views
199

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
19
Comments
0

1 Embed 199

http://cloudworks.ac.uk 199

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft Word

Usage Rights

CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike LicenseCC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike LicenseCC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    The Pedagogical Patterns Collector User Guide The Pedagogical Patterns Collector User Guide Document Transcript

    • The Pedagogical Patterns CollectorContentsContents................................................................................................................................................................ 1Introduction ........................................................................................................................................................ 1The Pedagogical Patterns Collector .......................................................................................................... 2 Definition of pedagogical patterns ....................................................................................................... 2 Pedagogical patterns available............................................................................................................... 3 Adopting and adapting a pattern .......................................................................................................... 3Using the PPC ..................................................................................................................................................... 4 The Browser screen .................................................................................................................................... 4 The Designer screen ................................................................................................................................... 4 The Abstractor screen................................................................................................................................ 6Registration and authentication of users................................................................................................ 7Follow-up ............................................................................................................................................................. 8IntroductionThe overall aim of the Pedagogical Patterns Collector is to enable teachers to share theirgood teaching ideas.There are many teachers and lecturers (and students) who have developed goodpedagogical ideas for teaching, using both conventional and digital methods. These goodideas and the experience embodied in the learning designs (or lesson plans, or sessionplans, etc.) tend to remain with the originator, or within the team who developed them.As the teaching community is now exploring digital technologies in education, manypeople are discovering interesting new ways of facilitating learning that exploit theopportunities afforded by interactive technologies. We need to build on theseexperiences if we are to make the most of them. This web-based tool offers one way inwhich we can, as a teaching community, build on and share our best ideas of how toteach with new technologies.The tool is open source and is available at www.tinyurl.com/ppcollector3. It is regularlyupdated without notification to users, but maintains backwards compatibility so thatdesigns exported from previous versions can still be imported into the new version.17 September 2012 1
    • The Pedagogical Patterns CollectorThe Pedagogical Patterns Collector(PPC) is an output from an ESRC-EPSRC fundedresearch project on a learning design support environment for teachers and lecturers1.It is a simple web interface that enables the user to browse a small number of genericlearning designs for selected learning outcomes, and see 3 instances of each one forcontrasting subject areas. This is intended to help a subject teacher see how a particularpedagogic approach can be migrated successfully across different topics.The user can also insert their own topic-specific terms into the generic pattern to see ifit works for them.If the user wishes to adopt one of the patterns, they can move to the design screen wherethey can adapt the wording, add new activities, change group sizes, and add differentresources, etc., in other words, make it their own, while still building on the work ofothers.The user can also go straight to the design screen to build up their own pedagogicalpattern from scratch.All the patterns adopted, adapted and created, can be saved into a specified location, andreopened from the PPC (using the Open button on the Designer screen).Definition of pedagogical patternsA pedagogical pattern is defined for these purposes as having the following components: A learning outcome A sequence of teaching-learning activities A grouping of the activities into segments to define stages of the pattern A categorisation of the learningtypes offered in the activities: Read/Watch/Listen Investigate/Inquire Discuss Practice Share/Collaborate Produce Properties for each activity: The category of learning type Teacher present or not Learning group size (1, 5, 30..., etc) Resources needed Duration in minutes Text describing how the activity is carried out Notes on the group of activities (e.g. differentiation, teacher reflections, student feedback, etc).1A Learning Design Support Environment, at https://sites.google.com/a/lkl.ac.uk/ldse/17 September 2012 2
    • Pedagogical patterns availableThe first screen, the Browser, offers a set of patterns that have been collected from otherteachers. By clicking on each one it displays the generic form, and by clicking on eachinstance at the bottom of the screen it shows the pattern interpreted for that topic.The generic form leaves the content components blank at the top of the screen, so whenyou put in your own content words it puts them into the pattern for you.Adopting and adapting a patternIf a pattern is useful you can adopt it for your own use by clicking the Adapt thispattern button at the top to move to the Designer screen.The pattern is represented here on a timeline showing the properties of each of theactivities, and an analysis of the overall learning experience as a pie-chart in the topright-hand corner. All these properties can be adapted.Other patterns generated from the PPC can be opened using the Open button.Your pattern can be saved using the Save button, for another user to open from the PPCand adopt for their own use.17 September 2012 3
    • Using the PPCThe Browser screenScroll through the patterns collection at the top right and select one.The generic version is displayed.Select from the Examples at the bottom right to see how the pattern works for thedifferent content topics. The coloured text is the content-specific part of the pattern.Only this changes when you click on the different examples. Doing this should help isseeing how the same pattern (expressed in the black text) can work in different subjectareas.Click on the Generic button at the bottom right, to display the empty content boxes atthe top.Type in your own text for a topic of interest to you, to fit the description of that patterncomponent. Your text is automatically inserted into the pattern.When you have a pattern description you would like to adapt, click on the Adapt thispattern button at the top.By clicking on the More options to narrow your search button under the Patternscollection you can filter them in terms of Blooms Taxonomy types of learning outcome.The Designer screenThe screen displays the pattern you have selectedORYou selected this screen from the Browser screen and it is blank.Note: the display always puts in a lot of extra spaces – you can improve the display bydragging the top part of any activity a little, and it all closes up to look more compact. Wehave not yet figured out how to do this automatically.To open a pattern from a folder:Click on the Open buttonTo create a pattern: Click in the Learning Outcome box at the top to type in your own learning outcome Click on the Add Blank TLA button (Teaching-Learning Activity) Type in the title of the TLA in the white pane at the top Click on the Add Learning Type button at the bottom Or, to delete the TLA, click on the close button [x] top rightTo definea learning activitytype: Type in the description of the activity in the white pane Use its drop-down menu to select the learning activity type Edit the Group size to fit your intention Edit the Duration to fit your intention – this defines the minutes it is meant to last Toggle the teacher icon for presence or absence of the teacher Click on the link icon to attach tools or resources This opens a new window Select the type of resource (or its closest equivalent) Type in its title17 September 2012 4
    • Type in its location – url, or file location Click the Attach button Click the Close button As you roll the mouse over the link icon it shows the title of your linked resource Click on the Add Learning Type button to add more types of learning to the TLA Click on the link icon to attach tools or resources for the whole TLA Add notes in the pane at the bottom, as appropriate Or, to delete the learning activity, click on the close button [x] top rightTo adapt a pattern: Edit the title of the TLA in the white pane at the top Use the drop-down menu to select another learning activity type Edit the description of the activity in the white pane Toggle the teacher icon for presence or absence of the teacher Edit the Duration to fit your intention of how long it should last Edit the Group size to fit your intention Drag the upper band of the activity up or down to change the order within a TLATo select a different pattern: Click on the Home button at the top and go to the Browser.To save a pattern: Click on the Save button to save it with the name and location of your choice.To export a pattern in xml format: Click on the ‘Export to LDSE’ button at the top.To print a pattern: Go to the Abstractor screen – see below.Use the Total session time at the top right to check on the duration of the learning timedesigned so far.Use the Pie-chart at the top right to check on the analysis of the current design in termsof the distribution of learning activities you have provided for students.17 September 2012 5
    • The Abstractor screenClick on Abstract Instance to Pattern at the top of the Designer screen.This screen is still under development. It is intended to enable you to create a genericversion of your pattern, so that other teachers can easily adapt it to their own topic area.However, it is not at all easy to abstract a pattern!The left hand area shows the pattern you created; the right hand area shows a copy of it.The middle section is where you can translate your content words into general words,so that other teachers can then put their own content words in their appropriate placein your pattern.To print a pattern: Click on Full view at top left Highlight the whole text, copy and paste to a Word document.To abstract a pattern: In the left hand pane, highlight one of the content words or phrase In the middle section in the blank text section at the top, type in a general version of the word/phrase and press Return. In the pattern on the right every occurrence of your word/phrase is now replaced with the general word/phrase. Check whether the grammar works ok (this is the tricky part – its very stupid, and you will often find that a word is in a slightly different form in another part of the pattern, or plurals dont work as they should, or the/a/an doesnt work). If you want to change the wording of the pattern to make the abstraction work better, click on Back to PPC Designer at the top, and fix up the original wording. If you want to undo the abstraction, click on it in the list in the middle pane and click Undo abstraction. Note: The abstraction procedure does not always produce the general word/phrase on the right-hand pane, but if you go back the the Designer screen and start again it will often then work – annoying because you lose what you did, but its been difficult to track why this happens. Apologies for this – were working on it. Continue to highlight other content words in the left hand pane in the same way until the pattern has been fully abstracted.To preview an abstracted pattern: Click on Preview your Pattern to see how the generic and instance versions work in a new window. Close the window. Tosave the generic version of the pattern, click on Save Abstraction as... and a window opens to allow you to choose where to save it. You can only open this version from the Abstractor screen.To share your pattern Click on Share your pattern online at the top of the screen. You can always delete a pattern you have shared. A window opens where you can describe your pattern. Give it a short title that expresses the pedagogic focus of the pattern. A short commentary could explain why you find it useful, the context in which you have used it, etc. Select the type of Learning Outcome (from Blooms Taxonomy) that fits it best. Select an organisational goal that it could assist.17 September 2012 6
    • Click on Share my Pattern Online at the bottom of the window, and you should receive a confirmation that it has been shared successfully. Click on Back to PPC Browser at the top of the screen. Click on Show user generated patterns, and your pattern should be listed at the bottom of the list of patterns. You can check its generic and instance versions by clicking on the buttons at the top of the screen.Registration and authentication of usersThe maintenance feature of the collection of patterns and associated designs inside thePPC tool is designed in a flexible way. Every installation of the PPC, by placing the PPCtool folder on the institutional server, creates a community of users in that institution.All the designs, or patterns, created henceforth are visible to all the users of thatinstallation (who are given the access to URL). There are two levels of users in the PPC –administrator and user. The user accounts are created inside the PPC by clicking on‘Register‘ button on the Home pageThe administrator accounts are created by editing the users.txt file that comes in the PPCpackage (folder), and in the <user> tag changing the admin attribute to ‘true‘ (see Figure1). Figure 1: Code for setting the administrator accountsIn this way every installation (copy) of the PPC can have a number of administratorswith moderation rights to delete designs from all the users, as well as user accounts withthe rights to delete only the designs that have been created from that user account. Thisprovides for greater user control over their contribution to the collection and a piece ofmind to go back on the shared design they decide they do not want to share any more.Also, with a number of administrators the task of moderating the collection is madeeasier. Another useful but as of yet not implemented feature, building on theauthentication mechanism described above, is the enablement of search fordesigns/patterns created by a particular user.A short video podcast showcasing the difference in user’s accounts is available at:http://screencast.com/t/eGSYmuSO5BN17 September 2012 7
    • Follow-upWe need to build up a library of interesting exemplars, so please email your saveddesigns to d.laurillard@ioe.ac.ukThe Patterns Collector is available at http://tinyurl.com/ppcollector3This is a research prototype, so there are probably glitches, and certainly there areinterface design features that can be improved. Please let us know what you find.We would like to hear from you if you are interested in collaborating with us on itsfurther development, so please get in touch.Thank you for your interestDiana Laurillardd.laurillard@ioe.ac.ukLondon Knowledge LabInstitute of Education, University of London17 September 2012 8