Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Lower Body Exercise
• Ahmad Nasrullah Bin Ahmad kamilluddin A12A009
• Ahmad Shaffiq Bin Roslan A12A012
• Muhammad Fahmi Bi...
Major Muscles of the Lower Body 1 – Thighs 2 – Hamstrings 3 – Gluteus 4
– Calves
Thig
h
Kne
e
Ankl
e
Lower Body Exercise
Without
equipment
Targets: Inner Thighs, Glutes,
Quadriceps, Outer Hips
• With feet hip-width apart and hands on
hips, slowly extend right l...
Targets: Inner Thighs, Glutes,
Hamstrings, Outer Hips
• Standing with hands on hips, hop 3
feet to your left, landing on y...
Targets: Hip Flexors, Outer Hips, Outer Thighs,
Glutes
• Lie faceup with knees bent and feet flat on
the floor.
• Slowly l...
Targets: Thighs, Glutes, Quadriceps
• Stand with hands on hips and kick
your right leg in an arc across the front
of your ...
Targets: Outer Thighs, Glutes, Hip Flexors
• Get on all fours, weight evenly balanced
between your hands and knees.
• Lift...
With Equipment
&
Mechanical
Squad
Instructions
Preparation
From rack with barbell at upper chest height,
position bar high on back of shoulders and
gr...
Another type of squad
Body weight squad
Cable bar squad
Dumb bell squad
Level plate loaded squad
Smith squad
Barbell squad...
Lever Leg Extension
Preparation
• Sit on apparatus with back against padded back
support.
• Place front of lower legs unde...
Lunges
Instructions
Preparation
From rack with barbell upper chest height, position bar on back of
shoulders and grasp bar...
Rear Lunge
Instructions
Preparation
• From rack with barbell upper chest height, position
bar on back of shoulders and gra...
Side Lunge
Instructions
Preparation
• From rack with barbell upper chest height, position
bar on back of shoulders and gra...
Barbell Step-up
Instructions
Preparation
Stand facing side of bench. Position bar on back of
shoulders and grasp barbell t...
Barbell Lateral Step-up
Instructions
Preparation
Stand between two benches, one to each side.
Position bar on back of shou...
Cable Step-up
Instructions
Preparation
Stand behind elevated platform and low and close pulley
cables to sides. Grasp stir...
Dumbell Step-up
Instructions
Preparation
Stand with dumbbells grasped to sides facing side of
bench.
Execution
Place foot ...
Dumbell Lateral Step-up
Instructions
Preparation
Stand between two benches, one to each side. Hold
dumbbells in each hand ...
Dumbell Step-down
Instructions
Preparation
Hold dumbbells in each hand down to sides and
stand with one foot on bench. Pos...
Exercise Ball Hamstring Curl
• Lay on your back on the floor with the heels on the ball
and arms on the floor.
• Lift your...
• Lay on the floor on your back with your arms on the
floor by your sides.
• Raise your legs so your calves are supported ...
Exercise Ball Inner Thigh
• Lay on your back with your knees bent.
• Place the ball in between your legs so your inner thi...
Common Knee Injuries
Fractures Dislocation
The most common bone broken around the knee is
the patella. The ends of the fem...
Collateral Ligament Injuries Tendon Tears
Injuries to the collateral ligaments are usually caused
by a force that pushes t...
TREATMENT OF KNEE INJURIES
Immobilization Your doctor may recommend a brace to prevent your knee from moving. If you
have ...
Common Ankle Injuries
Ankle Sprains Ankle Fractures (Broken Ankle)
• An ankle sprain usually occurs when a person lands
fr...
Pilon Fractures of the Ankle Stress Fractures of the Foot and Ankle
• Pilon fractures affect the bottom of the shinbone
(t...
Prevention of ankle injury
Neuromuscular Control Preventive Ankle Taping and Bracing
• Neuromuscular control relies on the...
Strength Training Footwear
• Achieving both static and dynamic joint stability
through strength training is critical in pr...
INJURIES AND TREATMENT FOR HIP
HIP POINTER
• a hip pointer is a deep bruise, or
contusion, on the top portion of the
pelvi...
Initial Treatment
• Rest 24-48 hours to prevent further damage.
A hip pointer needs time to heal itself.
• Apply ice packs...
Hip Flexor Strain
• A first degree hip flexor strain means one of
the hip flexor muscles has been stretched or
slightly to...
Initial Treatment
• Rest 24-48 hours to prevent further damage. A
hip pointer needs time to heal itself.
• Apply ice packs...
Hip Bursitis
• Hip bursitis is the most frequently reported cause
of hip pain and, but it is more likely to affect
middle-...
Initial Treatment
• Apply ice packs for 15-20 minutes,
3-4 times a day.
• Avoid or limit the activities or
movements that ...
Benefits of Lower Body Exercises
Improve Daily Life
Strong legs are important for daily activity. From walking and running...
THANK YOU
Lower body exercise
Lower body exercise
Lower body exercise
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Lower body exercise

254

Published on

lower body exercise with moving picture

Published in: Healthcare
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
254
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transcript of "Lower body exercise"

  1. 1. Lower Body Exercise • Ahmad Nasrullah Bin Ahmad kamilluddin A12A009 • Ahmad Shaffiq Bin Roslan A12A012 • Muhammad Fahmi Bin Mahsuri A12A288 • Muhammad Amirul Syafiq Bin Azli A12A277 • Annazifah Binti Bonnijan A12A031 • Alia Liyana Binti Abdul Hamid A12A019 • Siti Syarina Binti Md Isa A12A599
  2. 2. Major Muscles of the Lower Body 1 – Thighs 2 – Hamstrings 3 – Gluteus 4 – Calves
  3. 3. Thig h
  4. 4. Kne e
  5. 5. Ankl e
  6. 6. Lower Body Exercise
  7. 7. Without equipment
  8. 8. Targets: Inner Thighs, Glutes, Quadriceps, Outer Hips • With feet hip-width apart and hands on hips, slowly extend right leg to the side at hip height in 3 full counts. • Be sure to keep inner thigh parallel to the floor. • Hold for 1 count, then take 3 counts to lower to floor. • Do 15 times, then switch sides. STANDING SIDE KICK
  9. 9. Targets: Inner Thighs, Glutes, Hamstrings, Outer Hips • Standing with hands on hips, hop 3 feet to your left, landing on your left foot with left knee slightly bent. • Bring your right foot down to the floor. • Repeat to the right and continue alternating for a total of 15 on each side. SIDE JUMP
  10. 10. Targets: Hip Flexors, Outer Hips, Outer Thighs, Glutes • Lie faceup with knees bent and feet flat on the floor. • Slowly lift hips and extend left leg, pointing toes toward the wall in front of you. • Hold for 1 count, then move your left leg out to your left side at 90 degrees. • Hold for 1 count and return to center before lowering. • Do 10 times; switch sides. HIP RAISE
  11. 11. Targets: Thighs, Glutes, Quadriceps • Stand with hands on hips and kick your right leg in an arc across the front of your body before bringing your foot to the floor in a squat. • Step your left foot next to the right and come to a stand. • Do 15 times, then switch sides. TRAVELING SQUAT-KICK
  12. 12. Targets: Outer Thighs, Glutes, Hip Flexors • Get on all fours, weight evenly balanced between your hands and knees. • Lift your left leg out to the side, keeping knee bent 90 degrees and inner thigh facing the floor. • Quickly kick your leg diagonally behind you, bringing your heel toward the ceiling. • Return your left knee to the floor and do 10 times; switch sides. LEG RAISE
  13. 13. With Equipment & Mechanical
  14. 14. Squad Instructions Preparation From rack with barbell at upper chest height, position bar high on back of shoulders and grasp barbell to sides. Dismount bar from rack and stand with shoulder width stance. Execution Squat down by bending hips back while allowing knees to bend forward, keeping back straight and knees pointed same direction as feet. Descend until thighs are just past parallel to floor. Extend knees and hips until legs are straight. Return and repeat. Precaution - Keep back flat, neutral spine. - Avoid initiating movement w/ bending knees, push heels through floor. - Look straight forward.
  15. 15. Another type of squad Body weight squad Cable bar squad Dumb bell squad Level plate loaded squad Smith squad Barbell squad Sled squad Level selectorized squad
  16. 16. Lever Leg Extension Preparation • Sit on apparatus with back against padded back support. • Place front of lower legs under padded lever. • Position knee articulation at same axis as lever fulcrum. • Grasp handles to sides for support. Execution • Move lever forward and upward by extending knees until leg are straight. • Return lever to original position by bending knees. Repeat.
  17. 17. Lunges Instructions Preparation From rack with barbell upper chest height, position bar on back of shoulders and grasp barbell to sides. Execution Lunge forward with first leg. Land on heel then forefoot. Lower body by flexing knee and hip of front leg until knee of rear leg is almost in contact with floor. Return to original standing position by forcibly extending hip and knee of forward leg. Repeat by alternating lunge with opposite leg.
  18. 18. Rear Lunge Instructions Preparation • From rack with barbell upper chest height, position bar on back of shoulders and grasp barbell to sides. Dismount bar from rack. • Stand with dumbbells grasped to sides. Execution Step back with one leg while bending supporting leg. Plant forefoot far back on floor. Lower body by flexing knee and hip of supporting leg until knee of rear leg is almost in contact with floor. Return to original standing position by extending hip and knee of forward supporting leg and return rear leg next to supporting leg. Repeat movement with opposite legs alternating between sides.
  19. 19. Side Lunge Instructions Preparation • From rack with barbell upper chest height, position bar on back of shoulders and grasp barbell to sides. • Stand with dumbbells grasped to sides. Execution Lunge to one side with first leg. Land on heel then forefoot. Lower body by flexing knee and hip of lead leg, keeping knee pointed same direction of foot. Return to original standing position by forcibly extending hip and knee of lead leg. Repeat by alternating lunge with opposite leg.
  20. 20. Barbell Step-up Instructions Preparation Stand facing side of bench. Position bar on back of shoulders and grasp barbell to sides. Execution Place foot of first leg on bench. Stand on bench by extending hip and knee of first leg and place foot of second leg on bench. Step down with second leg by flexing hip and knee of first leg. Return to original standing position by placing foot of first leg to floor. Repeat first step with opposite leg alternating first steps between legs.
  21. 21. Barbell Lateral Step-up Instructions Preparation Stand between two benches, one to each side. Position bar on back of shoulders and grasp barbell to sides. Execution Lift leg and place foot on bench to side slightly forward of straight knee. Stand on bench by straightening leg and pushing body upward. Step down returning feet to original position. Repeat with opposite leg alternating between legs.
  22. 22. Cable Step-up Instructions Preparation Stand behind elevated platform and low and close pulley cables to sides. Grasp stirrups at each side of platform. Stand upright with arms straight down at sides. Execution Place foot of first leg on elevated platform. Stand on elevated platform by extending hip and knee of first leg and place foot of second leg on bench. Step down with second leg by flexing hip and knee of first leg. Return to original standing position by placing foot of first leg to lower position. Repeat first step with opposite leg alternating first steps between legs.
  23. 23. Dumbell Step-up Instructions Preparation Stand with dumbbells grasped to sides facing side of bench. Execution Place foot of first leg on bench. Stand on bench by extending hip and knee of first leg and place foot of second leg on bench. Step down with second leg by flexing hip and knee of first leg. Return to original standing position by placing foot of first leg to floor. Repeat first step with opposite leg alternating first steps between legs.
  24. 24. Dumbell Lateral Step-up Instructions Preparation Stand between two benches, one to each side. Hold dumbbells in each hand down to sides. Execution Lift leg and place foot on bench to side slightly forward of straight knee. Stand on bench by straightening leg and pushing body upward. Step down returning feet to original position. Repeat with opposite leg alternating between legs.
  25. 25. Dumbell Step-down Instructions Preparation Hold dumbbells in each hand down to sides and stand with one foot on bench. Position foot on bench to side slightly forward of straight knee. Execution Stand on bench by straightening leg and pushing body upward. Step down returning foot off of bench to floor and epeat. Continue with opposite position.
  26. 26. Exercise Ball Hamstring Curl • Lay on your back on the floor with the heels on the ball and arms on the floor. • Lift your buttocks up off the floor. • Roll the ball in towards you by bending your knees and hips until your knees are directly above your hips. • Straighten the legs again by pushing the ball away and repeat. • Variations and progressions. • Perform with only one leg on the ball - lift the other up slightly away from the ball.
  27. 27. • Lay on the floor on your back with your arms on the floor by your sides. • Raise your legs so your calves are supported on the ball. • Raise the buttocks off the floor until there is a straight line between the shoulders (on the floor) and ankles (on the ball). • Hold for up to 5 seconds and return to the floor. Exercise Ball Reverse Bridge
  28. 28. Exercise Ball Inner Thigh • Lay on your back with your knees bent. • Place the ball in between your legs so your inner thighs are against the ball. • Squeeze the ball with your inner thighs/knees and hold for 5 seconds. • Relax for up to 5 seconds and repeat.
  29. 29. Common Knee Injuries Fractures Dislocation The most common bone broken around the knee is the patella. The ends of the femur and tibia where they meet to form the knee joint can also be fractured. Many fractures around the knee are caused by high energy trauma, such as falls from significant heights and motor vehicle collisions. A dislocation occurs when the bones of the knee are out of place, either completely or partially. Dislocations can be caused by an abnormality in the structure of a person's knee. Patellar fracture Patellar dislocation.
  30. 30. Collateral Ligament Injuries Tendon Tears Injuries to the collateral ligaments are usually caused by a force that pushes the knee sideways. Injuries to the MCL are usually caused by a direct blow to the outside of the knee. Blows to the inside of the knee that push the knee outwards may injure the lateral collateral ligament. The quadriceps and patellar tendons can be stretched and torn. Falls, direct force to the front of the knee, and landing awkwardly from a jump are common causes of knee tendon injuries. Tears of the medial and lateral collateral ligaments.
  31. 31. TREATMENT OF KNEE INJURIES Immobilization Your doctor may recommend a brace to prevent your knee from moving. If you have fractured a bone, a cast or brace may hold the bones in place while they heal. To further protect your knee, you may be given crutches to keep you from putting weight on your leg. Physical therapy Specific exercises will restore function to your knee and strengthen the leg muscles that support it. Non-steroidal anti- inflammatory medicines Drugs like aspirin and ibuprofen reduce pain and swelling.
  32. 32. Common Ankle Injuries Ankle Sprains Ankle Fractures (Broken Ankle) • An ankle sprain usually occurs when a person lands from a jump onto an uneven surface and his or her ankle rolls inward. • Common symptoms associated with an ankle sprain are pain with swelling, bruising and inability to walk on the injured ankle. If significant ankle sprains are not adequately treated, permanent disability can result. • A fractured ankle can range from a simple break in one bone, which may not stop you from walking, to several fractures, which forces your ankle out of place and may require that you not put weight on it for a few months. • Simply put, the more bones that are broken, the more unstable the ankle becomes. There may be ligaments damaged as well. • Cause- Twisting or rotating your ankle, Rolling your ankle, Tripping or falling
  33. 33. Pilon Fractures of the Ankle Stress Fractures of the Foot and Ankle • Pilon fractures affect the bottom of the shinbone (tibia) at the ankle joint. • Pilon is a French word for pestle, an instrument used for crushing or pounding. In many pilon fractures, the bones of the ankle joint are crushed due to the high-energy impact causing the injury. • Pilon fractures are most often caused by high- energy impacts, such as, A pilon fracture often affects both bones of the lower leg, fall from height, motor vehicle/motorcycle collisions, skiing • A stress fracture is a small crack in a bone. Stress fractures often develop from overuse, such as from high-impact sports like distance running or basketball. • Most stress fractures occur in the weight-bearing bones of the foot and lower leg. • Rest is the key element to recovery from a stress fracture.
  34. 34. Prevention of ankle injury Neuromuscular Control Preventive Ankle Taping and Bracing • Neuromuscular control relies on the central nervous system to interpret and integrate proprioceptive and kinesthetic information and then to control individual muscles and joint to produce coordinated movements that collectively protect the joint from injury • Tape, properly applied, can provide some prophylactic protection. Tape that constricts soft tissues and blood circulation or disrupts normal biomechanical function can, in time, create unnecessary problems. • Ankle bracing – brace may prevent lateral and inversion movement of the foot without inhibiting plantar flexion.
  35. 35. Strength Training Footwear • Achieving both static and dynamic joint stability through strength training is critical in preventing ankle injury. A balance in strength throughout the full range of motion must be developed and maintained each of the four muscle groups that surround the ankle joint. Strengthening exercise should be done in eversion and inversion , which can be done by rocking the ankle back and forth on a wobble board and also in using surgical tubing. • shoes should not be used in activities for which they were not intended- for example, running shoes, which are design for straight ahead activity, should not be worn to play basketball, a sport demanding a great deal of lateral movement. Tips on preventing chronic injuryWarm up Cool down Stretching Icing Playing surface Proper footwear
  36. 36. INJURIES AND TREATMENT FOR HIP HIP POINTER • a hip pointer is a deep bruise, or contusion, on the top portion of the pelvis that can be felt on either side of the waistline. • The distinguishing characteristic is hip pain, plain and simple. How It Happens • A hip pointer is caused by a direct blow to the top portion of the pelvis, which is called the iliac crest. It could happen with a direct blow taken in a contact sport or when an athlete falls and hits the surface hard • (skier, cyclist, for example)
  37. 37. Initial Treatment • Rest 24-48 hours to prevent further damage. A hip pointer needs time to heal itself. • Apply ice packs for 15-20 minutes, 3-4 times a day for the first 24-72 hours, but don’t apply ice directly to the skin. How to Avoid This Inju • Most hip pointers are accidental events and cannot aprevented. Wearing protective hip padding appropriate for your sport gives some protection.
  38. 38. Hip Flexor Strain • A first degree hip flexor strain means one of the hip flexor muscles has been stretched or slightly torn. • Second degree strains refer to a partial tear of the muscle or tendon, • and in a third degree sprain, the muscle or tendon is completely severed—a rare event. • When a tendon is pulled off the bone at the place where it is attached, it is called an avulsion fracture. HOW IT HAPPENS • Iliopsoas, a hip flexor that can be strained when it contracts forcefully, especially when the leg is fully extended or prevented from moving. • Example : Kicking and sprinting • Hip flexors can be overused that can lead to strains. • Tight hip flexors may make an athlete more vulnerable to hamstring strains.
  39. 39. Initial Treatment • Rest 24-48 hours to prevent further damage. A hip pointer needs time to heal itself. • Apply ice packs for 15-20 minutes, 3-4 times a day for the first 24-72 hours, but don’t apply ice directly to the skin. • Aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen may relieve pain. • Compression shorts or a wrap bandage. • For second and third degree sprains, rest the leg that has been injured, use ice applications, and see a sports medicine physician. How to Avoid This Inju • Do not increase exercise intensity, duration, or frequency more than ten percent a week.
  40. 40. Hip Bursitis • Hip bursitis is the most frequently reported cause of hip pain and, but it is more likely to affect middle-aged and older adults rather than younger athletes and exercisers, and women are more often than men. • Hip bursitis most often involves the bursa that covers the greater trochanter of the femur, although the iliopsoas bursa can also become inflamed. HOW IT HAPPENS • Regardless of the location, hip bursitis happens when one or more bursa sacs are irritated and become inflamed due to trauma (getting hit and falling on the hip), overuse (in distance runners, for example), hip bone spurs, poor posture (caused by scoliosis, for example), arthritis or leg length differences.
  41. 41. Initial Treatment • Apply ice packs for 15-20 minutes, 3-4 times a day. • Avoid or limit the activities or movements that cause the pain for 2-3 days. • Aspirin, acetaminophen, ibuprofen and naproxen may relieve pain. Aspirin, ibuprofen and naproxen may relieve pain and reduce inflammation. • Use crutches if pain makes walking difficult. How to Avoid This Inju • Wear athletic shoes that provide adequate cushioning in the soles and side-to-side support. • Use protective padding to prevent hip injuries that might lead to bursitis. • Avoid or limit running on banked surfaces
  42. 42. Benefits of Lower Body Exercises Improve Daily Life Strong legs are important for daily activity. From walking and running to climbing stairs, leg exercises help strengthen your legs for daily life and all physical activity like increases bone strength, improves your balance and stamina and decreases injuries to your knees and hips, along with your risk of falling. Tone Your Total Body Toning the lower body is important for supporting the rest of your body; such as your core, upper body and head. Strong lower body helps slow the physical weakness that is part of the aging process and maintains balance, stamina and confidence. Burn More Calories As the biggest muscles in the body, leg muscles require more blood. The heart beats more to supply new blood to the lower body. By exercising the thighs, hamstrings, calves, and glutes, you can kick- start your metabolism and burn more calories. Get in Better Shape Strengthening your lower body allows you to perform more intense physical activity.
  43. 43. THANK YOU
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×