Learning Reconsidered Protocol Presentation

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Learning Reconsidered Protocol Presentation

  1. 1. Learning Reconsidered<br />Protocol Group<br />Christine Braun, <br />Amy Dinise-Halter, <br />Jessica Rehling, and Tony R. Smith<br />
  2. 2. Why Learning Reconsidered?<br />Opening Video<br />Refer to page 2 of Learning Reconsidered: <br />Heading - Toward A New Understanding of Students and Learning<br />
  3. 3. The Four A’s<br />Break into groups<br />3-4 people per group<br />10 minutes for each question to follow. We will prompt you for time.<br />
  4. 4. The Four A’s <br />What Assumptions do the authors of the text hold?<br />What do you Agree with in the text?<br />What do you want to Argue with in the text?<br />What parts of the text do you want to Aspire to?<br />
  5. 5. The Four A’s <br />What Assumptions do the authors of the text hold?<br />What do you Agree with in the text?<br />What do you want to Argue with in the text?<br />What parts of the text do you want to Aspire to?<br />
  6. 6. Bringing Us Back…<br />Coming back together…<br />
  7. 7. Putting Learning Reconsidered Into Practice…<br />Learning Outcomes<br />“Learning outcomes define the goals of learning experiences for students”<br />Student should be able to “do, know or value”<br />Not the same as student satisfaction<br />Multiple Levels with Outcomes<br />Look up, down and around<br />Adapted from Keeling & Associates, 2007, Learning Reconsidered Institute.<br />
  8. 8. Outcome-based Thinking<br />From process-based thinking to outcome-based thinking<br />Shift in attention from satisfaction to learning<br />Shift from “just doing an activity” to defining what students will learning from the activity and why the activity is important to student learning<br />Adapted from Keeling & Associates, 2007, Learning Reconsidered Institute.<br />
  9. 9. Writing Learning Outcomes<br />Characteristics of Good Learning Outcomes:<br />Observable<br />Measurable<br />Assessment becomes key to defining and examining student learning<br />Action-oriented<br />According to Keeling and Associates learning outcomes should be:<br />Very specific<br />Practical<br />Measurable<br />Meaningful<br />Consistent<br />Sensible<br />Credible<br />Adapted from Keeling & Associates, 2007, Learning Reconsidered Institute.<br />
  10. 10. Population<br />Action<br />Activity<br />Measurement<br />Learning<br />Assessment Tool<br />
  11. 11. Let’s Practice…<br />Groups: <br />Experiential Education<br />High School to College Transitions<br />Residential Life<br />Leadership Development<br />Transformative Learning<br />
  12. 12. Let’s Process…<br />What questions do you have?<br />What are the implications to the field? To you?<br />
  13. 13. What Amazing Opportunities<br />Closing Video<br />
  14. 14. References<br />Bloom, B. S. (1956). Taxonomy of educational objectives, handbook I: The cognitive domain. New York, NY: David McKay.<br />Keeling, R. P. (2007, June). From reconsidering learning to promoting student success: Creating institutional effectiveness [PowerPoint slides]. Retrieved from http://www.keelingassociates.com/ka/presentationsrecent.<br />Kendal,P. L. (1994). The continuing education guide: The CEU and other professional development criteria. Lakeville, MN: Hunt. Retrieved June 18, 2007 from American Association of Law Libraries at http://www.aallnet.org/prodev/outcomes.asp.<br />

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