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BPS DARTP London

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BPS DARTP London 2015

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BPS DARTP London

  1. 1. Researching Teaching Teaching Research. Jamie Davies
  2. 2. Head of Quality and Teacher of A Level Psychology, Wyke Sixth Form College (10 years). Senior Lecturer MSc in the Teaching of Psychology, Glyndwr University (2 years).
  3. 3. How much pedagogical research actually makes its way to frontline teachers and what impact is it actually having?
  4. 4. Total hours worked by type of school and role. (N=1,004) DFE: Teachers’ workload diary survey 2013 (February 2014), Pg. 14
  5. 5. What would improve the quality of teaching and pupil learning? (N=1,004) DFE: Teachers’ workload diary survey 2013 (February 2014), Pg. 21
  6. 6. “education is not a science it is a moral project” Evidence-based education is no panacea, and could undermine the moral authority of teachers. TES. Kevin Rooney, 18/10/15.
  7. 7. “… scientific research has little if any thing to tell us about how we educate our young. In a context where many educators are filled with uncertainty and anxiety about the purpose of education EBE has filled a vacuum at a time when many within education are looking for a sense of certainty, authority and moral purpose” Evidence-based education is no panacea, and could undermine the moral authority of teachers. TES. Kevin Rooney, 18/10/15.
  8. 8. http://staffrm.io
  9. 9. evidenceforthefrontline.com @evidenceftf
  10. 10. http://www.metproject.org/reports.php
  11. 11. Access to research Time to reflect and experiment in class Financial constraints Fear Opportunities!
  12. 12. learning is invisible
  13. 13. Students are busy: lots of work is done Students are engaged, interested and motivated Students are getting attention: feedback, explanations Classroom is ordered, calm and under control Curriculum has been ‘covered’ (ie presented to students in some form) Students have supplied correct answers (whether or not they really understood them, could reproduce them independently or knew them already). Improving Education: A triumph of hope over experience Professor Robert Coe (2013)
  14. 14. How to make it look as if your intervention has worked 1. Wait for a bad year or choose underperforming schools to start with. Most things self-correct or revert to expectations (you can claim the credit for this). 2. Take on any initiative, and ask everyone who put effort into it whether they feel it worked. No-one wants to feel their effort was wasted. 3. Define ‘improvement’ in terms of perceptions and ratings of teachers. DO NOT conduct any proper assessments – they may disappoint. 4. Conduct some kind of evaluation, but don’t let the design be too good – poor quality evaluations are much more likely to show positive results. 5. If any improvement occurs in any aspect of performance, focus attention on that rather than on any areas or schools that have not improved or got worse (don’t mention them!).
  15. 15. So … how do we measure the impact of our interventions?
  16. 16. Value Added? Observed Student Engagement? Headline Outcomes? Observations? Progression? Self-reports?
  17. 17. What impact does the research have on the student?
  18. 18. Show us your personality (but not too much) Remember that we do appreciate you Tell us when we’ve done well Show us that you care Don’t shout at us 'Show us that you care': a student's view on what makes a perfect teacher.
  19. 19. Meaningful Research Matters
  20. 20. 337 meta-analyses, 200,000 effect-sizes, 180,000 studies, ~50 million students Hattie: Influences On Student Learning (1999)
  21. 21. Influences On Student Learning. Hattie (1999) https://cdn.auckland.ac.nz/assets/education/hattie/docs/influences-on- student-learning.pdf  An effect size of 0.5 is equivalent to a one grade leap at GCSE  An effect size of 1.0 is equivalent to a two grade leap at GCSE  ‘Number of effects’ is the number effect sizes from well designed studies that have been averaged to produce the average effect size.  An effect size above 0.4 is above average for educational research
  22. 22. http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/2015/11/19/standing-on-the-shoulders-of-the-google-giant/
  23. 23. Class Research (time now linear?) HE support to Engage Teachers - EBE? Extended Project Qualification Access to research (CPD)
  24. 24. 0 5000 10000 15000 20000 25000 30000 35000 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Extended Project Entries 2009 – 2015 Data from JCQ
  25. 25. [We need to] teach psychology students to be savvy consumers and producers of research. Sternberg, 2012
  26. 26. [We need to] teach psychology students to be savvy consumers and producers of research. Sternberg, 2012 Thank You http://jamiedavies.co @jamiedavies

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