Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
IBM Smarter Cities Webinar City of Cambridge
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

IBM Smarter Cities Webinar City of Cambridge

579
views

Published on

Published in: Technology, Business

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
579
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
13
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • In the 2002 / 2003 – General public opinion and Management had a growing concern about buried infrastructure. Last look was in 1990 as a ‘one-time’ Capital Plan.Operations appeared to be operating in a highly re-active mode with very little pro-active inspection and maintenance programs.Capital Planning was done “Just in Time” for construction based on complaints and institutional knowledge of engineering staffNew Commissioner was hired with ‘Sustainability of Infrastructure” as #1 agenda.Two studies commissioned: Organizational Audit and an Asset Management Requirements Study
  • Really like to just discuss these and how you identified them and got folks on board. MCH – Timing was EVERYTHING here – we were prepared when funding options came available – we were ready to ‘claim’ the funding for Infrastructure sustainability as we had ‘just enough’ info to back-up the arguments.
  • Stakholders – Finance, Planning, Engineering, Operations, Risk Management, IT, Field Staff, Union Executive, Management Committee, Council (Public if and when you can)
  • Transcript

    • 1. City of Cambridge and IBM Build a Smarter City October 13, 2010 Presented by… Joel Martin Info-Tech Research Group Mike Hausser, P.Eng Director of Asset Management and Support Services City of Cambridge Michael Marsonet IBM Canada Ltd. Video Available @ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YCmPX_RkfcM
    • 2. Why did we do something so Smart? • In 2002 / 2003 ….. – “Infrastructure Gap” ? • Did Cambridge have one? • To what degree? • What would it take to get to ‘sustainable’ ? – Typical Local Government • No inventory, no metrics • Decisions were purely financial and subjective • Silo business functions • Aging workforce with intuitional knowledge
    • 3. Timeline… • 2003 – Initial Study to address the aging infrastructure issue • 2005 – Asset Management Division Established – Started with Inventory & ESRI’s GIS Technology • 2006 – Began condition assessments of roads, sewers, sidewalks, and storm infrastructure – Implemented Orion’s Onpoint GIS Portal for internal staff – Business Process Audits and Work Management Requirements & RFP • 2007 – Ongoing pipeline condition assessments – Selected IBM’s Maximo Work/Asset Management System • 2008 – Maximo – GoLive March 9th – middle of major snow storm • 2009 – Life-cycle analysis and long-term Financial Sustainability Plan for Capital Renewals (water/sewer). – Full integration of Asset Inventory with Financial PSAB Reporting • 2010 – Refinement of 10 year Capital Forecast based on integrated Needs Assessments and Financial Sustainability Plan.
    • 4. Key Issues • Accumulated Infrastructure Gap – System has aged faster then renewal – ‘Echo-effect’ of building booms of the past – Estimated $54M backlog in water system – Estimated $17M backlog in sewer system • Increased pressure on Operations & Maintenance – Higher failure rate on aged infrastructure – Re-active repairs on aging infrastructure increasingly consumes more and more resources • Increased expenses as a result of Infrastructure Gap – Examples… • Water Loss ~$2M Annually • Inflow / Infiltration to Sewer System ~ $4M Annually • Aging experienced workforce – Long term dedicated employees… – Impending knowledge gap when those individuals retire…
    • 5. Infrastructure Summary Asset Category Quantity Replacement Value Typical Life (yrs) Avg Age Parking Lots 25 $1,522,780 20 12 Storm Ponds 62 $87,433,507 50 13 Walkways 100 $4,138,861 40 24 Road & Sidewalk 980 lane*km $371,190,374 30 20 Bridges 24 $8,025,000 50 45 Culverts 61 $5,977,164 35 28 Dams 2 $2,000,000 50 102 Sewer System 480 km $298,530,301 65 35 Drainage System 320 km $185,210,195 65 28 Water System 490 km $294,619,300 70 40 $1,258,647,483
    • 6. Multiple Funding Opportunities.. • Capital Reserves ($1M) – Initial inventory, baseline technologies • Canadian Federal Gas Tax ($12M) – Knowledge Category ( 35% ) • Condition Assessments of Infrastructure • Technology ( 8 % ) • Studies – Infrastructure Renewal/Replacement ( 65% ) • Road Resurfacing • Replacing failing water pipes • Provincial Surpluses ( $9M) – Roads and Bridges • Stimulus Funding ($12M ) Local/Provincial/Federal – Road Resurfacing (10% of roads) • Rate Increases – 8.3% annually over next 10 yrs
    • 7. Insights Others Can Use • Involve ALL Stakeholders – Champion MUST have authority and is ACTIVE – Learn what their concerns / perspectives are. – Gain their trust ‘in their domain’ – Find the true start/end to the ‘hairball’ – Pose hypothetical alternative realities – Work around the ‘problem’ areas – Show RESULTS frequently • Use targeted external expertise – Ensure Knowledge Transfer • Technology and business process are inter-twined.
    • 8. Questions And Answers

    ×