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  • 1. 1 WHAT THE FONT? volume one
  • 2. 1 WHAT THE FONT? volume one Every two weeks, the Art Directors at TBWAHuntLascaris - Johannesburg get together to inspire one another. During one of these sessions, a challenge was put forward. Design your own typeface or font. And three weeks later, these were the results. WHAT THE FONT? volume one. Enjoy.
  • 3. Name: Choc Star Designer: Justin Wright Combining Freud’s views on anal retentiveness and the Egyptians beliefs that cats are gods, we naturally arrived at the Chocolate Starfish font. It’s natural versatility made it perfect for thin italic, textured, bold and bitmapped... allowing the user to achieve more expression in their chosen media. Even with the controversial banning in some parts of Germany, we believe it’s a font for all to use – the font for the modern family.
  • 4. Title: ALFAbet Designer: Jacque Moodley The love of Puns and Alfa Romeos
  • 5. Title: White on white Designer: Bruce Harris (with the loving help of Jason Murison) There isn’t any crazy concept here so stop looking. All I wanted to do was design a typeface that I thought was nice and would be proud to show my mother, so I showed her last night and she loved it. It also helps that white is my favourite colour and I like to punish myself by sitting for hours on end in the studio and on photoshop. Hope you like it.
  • 6. Title: “Recycle Bitches” Designer: Coenraad Grebe This particular font is based around the thought that everything should be recycled / re-used / re-appropiated / re-looked / re-engineered. Also it serves as a call to action and a rally cry of sorts. This served as my inspiration to re-look existing fonts (both designer and common), with the intent of borrowing, stealing and mashing them up to create something new, if not original. So, thanks to Helvetica, Gill Sans, Times, Rockwell and M/M Paris for allowing me (not intentionally) to rally the troops.
  • 7. Title: Zip It Designer: Erika Spethmann The client in reception who forgot to pull up his zip… I saw an ‘O’… and the rest just followed.
  • 8. Title: Clip Art Designer: Graeme van Jaarsveld Working in an office environment I wanted to create a font that related to that, and that had a different touch to the normal bland kind of look. The look I went for was almost that of a darkroom/ photographic kind of look.
  • 9. Title: Pins and Needles Designer: Ilze Venter My inspiration was the creation of something new out of bits and pieces of fabric, scraps and anything I could find in my cupboards. When people talk they cut, add, pin and mix words together to make a sentence. It reflects my love for making things by hand.
  • 10. Title: Disco Designer: Jacx In the light of the festivities and all the parties in and around the agency I found it fit to do a Disco font. Using the mirror ball as my main inspiration, (taking me back to my bedroom DJ days) I created a font which represents a bit of my past. So being the party animal that I am it just seemed like a perfect fit. I’m a 80’s baby after all. Lol.
  • 11. Name: Obession Designer: Shelley & Nadja To show the love-affair women have with shoes, we turned it into a typeface. w
  • 12. Title: A Type of Font Designer: Jens Henkel A font made up of a continuous story. Each letter leading onto the next. A type making up a type, while telling a story.
  • 13. Title: Desktop Font Designer: Adam Weber This typeface is inspired by the patterns and shapes made by folders and files that clutter our mac desktops. It is based on the Din font family and was created using photoshop, screen savers and command-shift-3.
  • 14. Title: Eat Your Words Designer: Jodi Smith & Laura Grobler Say what you mean or eat what you say!
  • 15. Name: 6MM Designer: Kerry Moralee My goal whilst creating the 6mm font was to turn completely unaesthetic items such as 6mm nuts and varied 6mm bolts into elegant letters making up a font without messing with their original form. So what you’re seeing is a font made from only 6mm bolts and nuts, that you find at any hardware store, assembled without perversion of their true form into a font.
  • 16. Name: “PIN-UP” Designer: Kursten Meyer I pin up all my ideas, layouts, inspiration, references and scamps on my pin board. It’s something I use every day and therefore was the inspiration behind my font.
  • 17. Name: “Pegs” Designer: Lucas & Sarel The font was inspired by a lady we saw hanging clothes onto the washing line using pegs.
  • 18. Name: “Marv. The Font” Designer: Marvin Zwambila Inspired by my character in terms of the properties a wire holds. For starters it can be bent to make almost any shape, can handle electricity and of course is straight and hard. Because of these properties wire is often stolen off fences, train cables and other areas. So wire is an essential part of our society, just like me. P Apologies to the passenger trains that .S. ran late. Find solace in knowing the wire was used to uplift a poor individual.
  • 19. Name: Summoned Designer: Melanie Moore My font went through many stages before reaching the final idea. It was inspired by naughty boys who take the warning label on deodorant cans as an instruction manual for fun.
  • 20. Name: 2D Designer: Natalie le Roux This typeface was inspired by CMYK and photography. CMYK is a layered printing process, which uses four inks (Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and Black) to create realistic images onto a 2D paper surface. Photography is a way of capturing and representing reality on a 2D surface. I have included some of my cameras and the overlapping CMYK effect on the board to depict the inspiration. Technically, the font is designed by layering CMYK strips across each other to form characters. Because all three C, M and Y never intersect with each other to create black, I have placed black and grey photographs behind them, to give some sense of light and depth to the typeface. The photographs used are some of my own and some of my favourites. Another element of the typeface is the use of right triangles, which have been sliced off on one strip and replaced somewhere else on each character to add some interest and form serifs and geometric curves.
  • 21. Name: My Wire Blocks Designer: Pieter Steyn This font is based on the 6 fonts most commonly used by us in the agency including Arial, Futura and Myriad and Trebuchet. I used a 3D effect in Illustrator, and made the wire/block shapes. Later in InDesign I factorised the letters. I only used the block Capitals as they represent the building and construction TBWA is undergoing at the new building, as well as the indifference between the nation, there should be no difference between upper and lower case or class (in an absolute world).
  • 22. Name: Rock Art Designer: Tebogo Disrupting rock art into a font... Why because the khoi people used rock art to communicate and tell stories, so I designed rock art font for people to use and communicate and tell interesting stories.
  • 23. Name: Dirty Words Designer: Thereza Grala All the things a person says during their day that they wish they’d never said.
  • 24. Name: Scaff Designer: Shelley, Nadja & Raff Inspired by moving into a building that’s half-complete and the scaffolding that surrounds us.
  • 25. Name: 1810 Extra Bold Designer: Michael Muller As creatives we spend many hours brainstorming, writing and crafting thoughts and ideas so that they hopefully come to fruition and ultimately a crescendo of inner satisfaction. Most of these ideas start out as scamps and thoughts scribed by the hand of the creative in bursts of optimism – the belief you could have possibly cracked something that will make your CD smile and your peers green with envy. This very handwriting, that is the beginning of the physical formation of ideas is as unique to everyone as our fingerprints and through analysis can very accurately reveal who we are. And who we are is predominantly a combination of life experience. That being said, life experience and the fingerprint it leaves in the form of handwriting coupled with the love of my work are the inspiration for my typeface 1810 Extra Bold. The brown paper element represents the reams of paper that I consume trying to crack ideas and the typeface is an adaption of my handwriting. The name 1810 Extra Bold is made up of two parts, my birthday – 18 October and the Extra Bold is a reflection of my personality.
  • 26. Name: Tape Designer: Wihan Meerholz All the best memories and most classic times are kept on the most classic thing, video tapes. They tell a story and could even spell things out for us.
  • 27. Name: Semiotic Typeface Designer: Katleho Mofolo My typeface is inspired by contours, semiotics1 human signs and , contortionists. Everyday we consciously and subconsciously see signs wherever we go, in and around cities and towns, on traffic lights, toilets, gates etc. These street signs or signs are visuals read as text subliminally and help communicate a range of commands, warnings, clues and sometimes indicate future change. Everyone succumbs to these signs and whenever one defies them danger occurs e.g. accidents. I see them as fascinating signage because even illiterate people can understand what they convey unlike the ordinary code of plain wording. I find the shapes that contortionists transform themselves into when performing as extraordinary exhibitions to demonstrate human body capability. I think contortionists literally prove that limits are only as real as the mind comprehends them to be. The forms and shapes that they turn themselves into physically articulate man power in a different dimension of body art, and through the contorting of the their bodies I perceive art. I decided to name my typeface SEMIOTIC because of the study of semiotics which explains the importance of sign conventions and sign theory to mankind. I believe the study of symbols, codes, indexes, signs and signifiers assists to simplify communication for better understanding about different or foreign behavioral patterns.