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Grassroots Corporate Philanthropy and the Employee Experience
Grassroots Corporate Philanthropy and the Employee Experience
Grassroots Corporate Philanthropy and the Employee Experience
Grassroots Corporate Philanthropy and the Employee Experience
Grassroots Corporate Philanthropy and the Employee Experience
Grassroots Corporate Philanthropy and the Employee Experience
Grassroots Corporate Philanthropy and the Employee Experience
Grassroots Corporate Philanthropy and the Employee Experience
Grassroots Corporate Philanthropy and the Employee Experience
Grassroots Corporate Philanthropy and the Employee Experience
Grassroots Corporate Philanthropy and the Employee Experience
Grassroots Corporate Philanthropy and the Employee Experience
Grassroots Corporate Philanthropy and the Employee Experience
Grassroots Corporate Philanthropy and the Employee Experience
Grassroots Corporate Philanthropy and the Employee Experience
Grassroots Corporate Philanthropy and the Employee Experience
Grassroots Corporate Philanthropy and the Employee Experience
Grassroots Corporate Philanthropy and the Employee Experience
Grassroots Corporate Philanthropy and the Employee Experience
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Grassroots Corporate Philanthropy and the Employee Experience

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Grassroots corporate philanthropy - driven by employees and supported by employers - is on the rise. This paper discusses how corporate philanthropy is changing, how it affects employee engagement …

Grassroots corporate philanthropy - driven by employees and supported by employers - is on the rise. This paper discusses how corporate philanthropy is changing, how it affects employee engagement and loyalty, and how that in turn delivers a demonstrable ROI over the medium and long term.

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  • 1. head2head/research CORPORATE PHILANTHROPY: Do grassroots initiatives in the workplace improve the employee experience? Sarah Welstead Director, User Experience April 2009
  • 2. OVERVIEW Corporate philanthropy programs which invove high levels of employee participation: We all know they seem like a good idea, and HR specialists will tell you that they make a difference to the organization in all kinds of ways. But do these ‘grassroots’ giving back programs in fact translate into improved business success? In terms of HR and recruiting specifically, do these programs increase the "Allowing employees to level of 'employee engagement', resulting in easier recruiting, improved link arms and give back retention, and increased productivity? collectively is a simple way to inspire your workforce." Drawing a straight line to ROI Peggy Pelosi, Founder It can be difficult to establish a clear correlation between grassroots giving ORENDA back programs and the bottom line, especially for small and mid-sized organizations who don't have complex research tools and resources in-house. So Head2Head decided to assess our own ‘Head2Head Gives Back’ program: By examining our own program, surveying our employees, and reviewing current research, we can better understand the role of grassroots giving back programs in overall business success. Why produce this whitepaper? It’s our hope that our experiences can serve as an example for other smaller, entrepreneurial organizations to come up with their own grassroots giving back programs. We’ve tried to pull together some data, too, to help convince the bean counters that this kind of thing is more than a ‘feel good’ exercise – and demonstrate that it’s good for the business! What do we mean by 'Grassroots Giving Back' programs? We're using the term 'grassroots' to refer to corporate philanthropy initiatives which involve high levels of employee participation at a grassroots (bottom- up) level. This is distinct from traditional corporate philanthropy, which tends to be 'top-down'-driven, with little or no involvement by employees on a day- to-day basis, and results in a large cheque being presented (and maybe a hospital wing named after someone titan of industry).
  • 3. TABLE OF CONTENTS OVERVIEW .................................................................................................................. 2 Drawing a straight line to ROI .......................................................................... 2 Why produce this whitepaper?......................................................................... 2 What do we mean by 'Grassroots Giving Back' programs? ............................. 2 CORPORATE PHILANTHROPY IS CHANGING ........................................................ 4 'Giving back' is a key element of celebrities' personal brand ........................... 4 More awareness, of more causes, than ever before .............................................. 4 Grassroots zeitgeist: from teenagers to office culture..................................... 5 The Gen Y influence .............................................................................................. 5 The 'lean living' movement ..................................................................................... 5 Charity begins in the workplace: The value of corporate philanthropy to business success .................................................................................................................. 6 The connection between philanthropy and stakeholder behaviour .................. 6 Employee engagement .................................................................................... 6 Employee engagement translated into dollars and cents ................................ 7 What does this mean for HR and recruiting? ......................................................... 7 Of particular note to recruiters: ........................................................................ 7 THE HEAD2HEAD GIVES BACK PROGRAM ............................................................ 9 Why we created H2H Gives Back .......................................................................... 9 Well, for starters, it's the Right Thing To Do .................................................... 9 Responsiveness to employees and other stakeholders................................... 9 Recruitment thought leadership ....................................................................... 9 Brand-building for a growing company .......................................................... 10 Grassroots Giving Back programs increase 'buzz' ........................................ 10 PROGRAM DETAILS ................................................................................................ 11 Choosing the charity ............................................................................................ 11 The initiatives ....................................................................................................... 11 Initiative #1: ‘Every Hour Counts’ .................................................................. 11 Initiative #2: ‘Do Your Own Thing’................................................................. 11 SURVEY OF EMPLOYEES ....................................................................................... 14 Preferred charities to support ............................................................................... 15 WHAT WE’VE LEARNED SO FAR ........................................................................... 16 CONCLUSIONS ......................................................................................................... 18 The impact on recruiting and HR ......................................................................... 18 ABOUT HEAD2HEAD ............................................................................................... 19
  • 4. CORPORATE PHILANTHROPY IS CHANGING Corporate philanthropy isn’t a new idea: since the late 1800s, barons of industry have been writing cheques to worthy causes, and having buildings, hospitals and university chairs named in their honour. After all, there’s no better PR opportunity than a big photo of yourself handing over a $10 million cheque to some worthy organization, or thousands of people seeing your name in huge letters on the side of a hospital. 'Giving back' is a key element of celebrities' personal brand In today’s media climate, where net worth and salaries of businesspeople and celebrities are common knowledge, it’s more important than ever for well- known, successful media figures to be seen to be 'giving back'. The success of mega-stars like Oprah Winfrey, Brangelina, Bill Gates and Madonna depends, to a large extent, on people 'liking' them - and it's hard to stay popular when everyone knows you made $47 million last year and kept it all to yourself. Whether it's starting a foundation (like Bill Gates), establishing a school for underprivileged children (Oprah), or being a UN Goodwill Ambassador (Angelina Jolie), involvement with charitable causes is now a INCREASED crucial element of a celebrity's personal brand. AWARENESS For the average worker, however, charity hasn’t historically been part of their day-to-day work environment: In an effort to prevent employees from losing productivity to non-work-related activities, many companies banned charity in the workplace. LEAN LIVING GEN Y IN THE (Because let's face it: none of us want to be hounded by co- MOVEMENT WORKPLACE workers to buy their kids' Girl Guide cookies or sponsor their bowlathon or donate to their church bake sale.) But this is changing. In the past few years, increased awareness, the influx of Gen Y into the workforce, and the recent trend towards 'lean living', have combined to create an environment in which 'business' and 'charity' are no longer mutually exclusive within the workplace. More awareness, of more causes, than ever before We may decry the non-stop newscycle - the websites, blogs, social network media, instant access to breaking news - which streams information at us 24/7, on a global scale, but it's had a significant consequence: the average person in a first-world country today is more aware of more social and community challenges than ever before, whether those challenges are around the corner or around the world.
  • 5. Grassroots zeitgeist: from teenagers to office culture In many ways, this increased awareness started with teenagers: teens, always ready to get passionate about something, were the first hard-core adopters of the internet, which gave them access to information about ‘social injustices’ (always a popular rallying point for teens), and in the late 90s we saw more and more teens organizing fundraisers for Tibetan monks, food drives at school, and even participating in reality shows which involve sending them to third-world countries to build schools and infrastructure. "I don't think the American Dream of owning the biggest car is The Gen Y influence contributing to a higher According to USA Today, 61% of people aged 13-25 feel personally quality of life…" responsible for making a difference in the world. Additionally, “69% consider Dominic Mishio, University of a company’s social and environmental commitment when deciding where to Alberta student shop, and 83% will trust a company more if it is socially/environmentally responsible.” Most importantly, 79% said they “want to work for a company that cares about how it affects or contributes to society.” Since Gen Y represents a sought-after demographic in terms of the workforce (recession or no recession, there are still more people leaving the workforce at the older end of the spectrum than entering at the younger end), their desires and beliefs have assumed an increased importance in the workplace. In many ways it’s their commitment to activism and social causes which has helped to drive the movement towards corporate giving back programs in the past few years. The 'lean living' movement Environmentalism and the recession have combined to produce a new trend: leaner living. The blogophere now abounds with stories of people who are living on less: feeding themselves on $100 monthly food budgets (by growing some of their own), abandoning their SUVs for Priuses,increasing their visits to libraries instead of buying more video games – getting and spending as much as possible is no longer necessarily the defacto goal. The leaner living approach involves reducing and reusing – which means that more co-workers are arranging clothing drives, garage sales, etc., with the proceeds often going to good causes. This in turn is beginning to translate into office culture: in the past 12 months, we’ve seen an increase in RFP (Request for Proposals) that specifically require information about environmental initiatives and corporate giving back initiatives as part of the criteria upon which organizations are choosing suppliers for big contracts.
  • 6. CHARITY BEGINS IN THE WORKPLACE: THE VALUE OF CORPORATE PHILANTHROPY TO BUSINESS “Corporate philanthropy SUCCESS can be an effective tool It's great that more and more people believe that giving back is just as for companies that are important between 9 and 5 as it is at home, but what does this mean for trying to meet consumers’ business? After all, without business success, there wouldn't be anything in rising expectations of the the coffers to 'give back', anyway. role businesses should play in society.” The connection between philanthropy and stakeholder behaviour McKinsey Quarterly study, The Walker Information Council on Foundations study (2002) found that February 2008 stakeholders of organizations with high CPI (Corporate Philanthropy Index) ratings tend to engage in behaviours which “lead directly to the company’s bottom line success.” Stakeholders of organizations with high CPIs tend to: Recommend the company and its products and services Believe the company’s reputation is excellent Continue to do business with, work for, or invest in the company Say they are committed to the organization, and would recommend it as a good place to work and with which to do business Be truly loyal (committed to the company and planning to continue the relationship) For our purposes, the last three bullet points are really the most important: when employees perceive the organization to have a high CPI, they tend to be more engaged with the organization – which in turn affects recruiting, retention, and productivity. Employee engagement A review of the Gallup Studies regarding employee engagement and business performance found that employee turnover is reduced and productivity is increased when the employee feels that: The organization cares about him/her There is a strong mission/purpose The organization is a ‘friend’ The organization is committed to quality The organization provides opportunities to learn and grow What’s more, the Gallup studies found a demonstrable relationship between employee engagements and business unit success: business units at the 95th percentile of employee engagement improve their odds of success by 42%
  • 7. over the median business unit (and by 145% over the business units at the 5th percentile). Employee engagement translated into dollars and cents The Gallup data review allows us to extrapolate to attach dollar values to employee engagement by translating business unit success, customer satisfaction and employee turnover into hard costs. Assume a 100-person business unit or organization, with $20 million in revenue: Difference between organization with low employee engagement and Annualized cost one with high employee engagement Turnover 4-8% $125,000 Customer satisfaction 2-3% $400,000-$600,000 Productivity 5-60% $1,000,000+ Profitability measures 2% $400,000 SOURCE: Adapted/extrapolated from Table 9.3 in ‘Well-Being in the Workplace and its Relationship to Business Outcomes: A Review of the Gallup Studies”, 2002. What does this mean for HR and recruiting? We can actually draw a straight line from grassroots giving back programs to employee engagement – and to a demonstrable effect on the bottom line. Corporate giving Greater employee It’s possible to Which means that back programs engagement has attach specific corporate giving lead to greater a demonstrable dollar values to back programs employee effect on turnover, turnover, have an impact engagement retention and retention and on the bottom line productivity productivity Of particular note to recruiters: One of the factors not specifically mentioned - but which we know is at play - is that companies with greater employee engagement tend to generate more candidate referrals than other organizations. And we all know that referrals
  • 8. from current and former employees typically deliver a larger percentage of A- list candidates, faster, than any other sourcing method. So establishing a grassroots giving back program means that ultimately, recruiting becomes faster, easier and cheaper - and delivers a better quality of hire in the longer term.
  • 9. THE HEAD2HEAD GIVES BACK PROGRAM In January 2008, Head2Head implemented the 'Head2Head Gives Back' program. The program was designed to reflect Head2Head’s corporate philosophy that Before there was H2H Gives bringing the entrepreneurial spirit of small business to community-minded Back, we initiatives can have benefits for everyone: employees, the business, and the charitable organizations involved. Got involved with our clients' causes (such as Virgin Unite) Why we created H2H Gives Back Donated to SickKids Hospital instead of sending Christmas cards Well, for starters, it's the Right Thing To Do Supported (with As a very fast-growing company (in 2000, we were 'two guys in a basement'; sponsorship or time off) by 2008, we had grown to $15 million in annual revenue, with 35 employees employees who in 3 offices across Canada), we've always believed in giving back to the participated in activities community (see box at right). like a run for cancer Provided internships for So in many ways, H2H Gives Back was really just a formal acknowledgement new Canadians and recent grads through of something we were doing already. Establishing it as an 'official' program - CareerBridge and and giving it a logo, brand identity and a name - was a good way of raising CareerEdge the profile of our endeavours. By keeping it top-of-mind with employees, we Donated used office knew we'd increase employee engagement - and the program would deliver supplies to non-profit an even better experience to our employees. organizations Offered donations to the charity of their choice in Responsiveness to employees and other stakeholders lieu of referral rewards Each year, Head2Head recruiters place more than 13,000 people in new jobs, which means we’re interacting with hundreds of candidates every year. Over the past 12-18 months, we've seen a marked increase in the number of candidates who tell us that grassroots corporate philanthropy programs are increasingly important to them, and play a role in their decisions about working for specific organizations. Recruitment thought leadership As the only company in Canada which focuses on providing on-site recruiters- by-the-hour – and several other unique recruiting-related offerings in the Canadian and North American marketplace – Head2Head has always been seen as an innovative organization. Our network of more than 4000 recruiters across Canada puts us in a unique position to be connected to more up-to-date recruiting information than anyone else – so it made sense for us to be ahead of other recruiting organizations in terms of establishing a grassroots giving back program.
  • 10. Brand-building for a growing company As a smaller ($15 million revenue), newer (Head2Head was founded in 2000) organization, the brand-building advantages of a corporate philanthropy program are obvious: it gives us something to talk about in the marketplace, to clients, consultants, candidates and other stakeholders. Grassroots Giving Back programs increase 'buzz' Recruiters have always known that A-list candidates and employees are likely to know other A-list candidates - which is why more than 72% of Canadian recruiters say that referrals from current or former employees are the single most important source of great candidates. What's more, a company with a strong referral network spends less time and money on sourcing, recruitment advertising, recruiting agencies and other recruiting-related services. In other words, word-of-mouth - the 'buzz' - is crucial to recruiting success. As we've seen with companies like Google and Virgin - which have such strong 'giving back' attributes in their consumer and recruitment brands - establishing grassroots philanthropy can dramatically increase the 'buzz' about your organization. As we often say: "Go ahead - talk about us behind our backs!"
  • 11. PROGRAM DETAILS The ‘Head2Head Gives Back’ Program was officially launched in January of 2008. The structure was to be a series of discrete initiatives, determined on an ad hoc basis. Choosing the charity Initially, we chose a single organization (SEDI: Social and Economic Development Initiatives) as the beneficiary of our initiatives. This seemed like a good fit: we’re a recruiting company, and one of SEDI’s goals is to put people back into the workforce. However, it turned out to be a poor fit: SEDI’s typical donors tended to give $100,000+ – making us a very, very small potential player – and the majority of our employees simply couldn’t emotionally engage with SEDI, which seemed too corporate and insufficiently immediate to capture their imagination. A poll of employees determined that while everyone wanted to help community organizations – regardless of what the organization was – opinions were sharply divided as to whether that organization should be local, national international; focused on children, disease, social injustice – everyone had a different opinion. So after our initial initiative (“Every Hour Counts”, described below), we decided to let employees choose the charity/organization(s) about which they felt most passionate. The initiatives Initiative #1: ‘Every Hour Counts’ In March 2008, Head2Head donated 25 cents from every hour worked by our 100+ consultants to SEDI. We were happy with this program insofar as it raised more than $4500 for SEDI, but because it didn't have a strong employee involvement component, it didn't create the positive 'buzz' we'd hoped for. Initiative #2: ‘Do Your Own Thing’ For our second initiative, we wanted to do something which would maximize employee participation - and let us have some fun in the process. So we came up with 'Do Your Own Thing': Between September 15- December 15, 2008, employees were encouraged to come up with creative
  • 12. ways to raise money for causes they believed in, and Head2Head would match any funds they raised. We had only one restriction: You could raise money for whatever cause you felt most passionate about, but in order to be eligible for the 'matching funds', the organization had to have a registered charity number in Canada. Otherwise, employees could do whatever they wanted - the more creative, the better. We also offered an incentive to encourage competition: at the end of the initiative, the employee or group of employees (they could work individually or in teams) which had raised the most money would each receive a paid day off. We had a lot of fun with this one: as an entrepreneurial company, our employees like coming up with interesting ideas and areenthusiastic with the follow-through, including: Thursday wing days For a 25-cents-per-wing surcharge, one of our senior CRM Specialists would deliver hot wings to your desk every Thursday at lunch. The surcharge was donated to SickKids Hospital (25 cents per wing really adds up - we made $200!). The Jessarelle Boutique Three employees - whose combined names formed 'Jessarelle' - asked friends and family to donate their new/gently used designer clothes and cosmetics, then hosted the 'Jessarelle Boutique' on a Friday afternoon. H2H- ites sipped champagne while purchasing items such as Christian Louboutin shoes and Burberry shirts for a fraction of their retail price. We're a fashion- conscious group - the boutique raised more than $400 for women's shelters. Coffee Concierge Throughout the 3-month period, the Head2Head recruiting team ran coffee/snack runs each morning and afternoon. For a donation of $1, they'd pick up your coffee at Starbucks or your afternoon doughnut from Tim Horton's. This became a very popular service, and raised more than $200. (Of all the Do Your Own Thing initiatives, this is the one we'll miss the most - there have already been requests to make this a permanent function!) Echo Jibe jewellery sale Our Director of Sales and Operations has a sister who is a professional jewellery designer, under the name Echo Jibe. She and her sister hosted two jewellery events, with 10% of sales donated to the Heart & Stroke Foundation. Total raised? $150!
  • 13. 24-Hour Food Sort with the Daily Bread Each year in October, the Daily Bread food bank runs the 24-Hour Food Sort event: Teams of 10 from Toronto-area businesses compete to see who can sort the most food in 2.5 hours. The H2H team - looking like colourblind bumblebees in their orange-and-blue striped shirts - worked fast and came in 4th in their time slot! More importantly, the Daily Bread Food Bank received $500, and much-needed help sorting almost 100,000 pounds of food. Ongoing initiative: The H2H DVD Club A great example of the ‘living lean’ idea: Head2Head employees were encouraged to bring in their own DVDs. Then co-workers could borrow them – at a cost of $1 per DVD. All the money earned is to be given to the Canadian Liver Foundation (because the Managing Partner who started and runs this initiative has a sister who recently had a liver transplant). Initially designed to be a part of the Do Your Own Thing initiative, this didn’t start until after DYOT ended, and shows no signs of winding down, 3+ months later. Upcoming initiative: ‘Get Canned!’ A humourous response to the recession, this initiative (May 2009) will see Head2Head donate a canned good to the Daily Bread Food Bank for every candidate who comes to our office for an interview. If candidates choose to bring their own canned good (which will have no bearing on the success of their interview or potential hire), Head2Head will donate two canned goods. We hope to generate more than 500 canned goods over the course of the month.
  • 14. SURVEY OF EMPLOYEES In our research – both in terms of grassroots corporate philanthropy initiatives and in the measurement of their efficacy – we discovered that while everyone speaks anecdotally to the positive response of employees regarding these programs, very few publicize the actual response of their employees. In an effort to help other organizations understand the potential benefits of this kind of program, we surveyed our employees – and present our findings here. “Amazing program, gave a sense of community, team Demographics of respondents: work and high levels of ethics, and was lots of 57% aged 30-39 (so the majority are NOT Gen Ys) fun. Which is what I 43% aged 25-29 believe Head2Head 48% in the workforce for 5-10 years stands for.” 33% in the workforce for 11-20 years Remainder in the workforce for less than 5 years Head2Head employee (survey respondent) Response highlights: 86% indicated that corproate giving/community involvement programs were important 43% indicated they were ‘very important’ No respondents indicated they were ‘not important’ Almost 70% agreed that these programs were important to them More than 80% said that a corproate giving back program was something they told their friends and family about Only one person agreed with the statement that ‘charity does not belong in the workplace’ Almost 60% agreed with the statement that “These programs are a good indication about whether a company is forward-thinking and a fun place to work.” Somewhat surprising findings: Almost 20% disagreed with the statement that corporate giving back programs were a factor in their decision to work for an organization – and almost 50% indiated they were ‘neutral’ on the subject More than 10% indicated that involving the employees in a program like this was less powerful than the company just writing a cheque
  • 15. Preferred charities to support We asked respondents which sorts of organizations/causes they most liked to support. Predictably, we got a variety of answers (we let them choose more than one): Types of organizations employees most wanted to support (% of total - more than one selection allowed) It doesn't matter Other Global disease-related organizations Global community organizations Animal-related organizations Canadian community organizations Canadian disease-related organizations Local community organizations Child-based organizations 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 Other comments and feedback After 3 months of the ‘Do Your Own Thing’ initiative, employees felt a little frustrated that their co-workers were constantly asking them for money for something Most respondents wanted to see the Do Your Own Thing program continued on a year-round basis The total dollar amounts raised might have been small, but it set up a culture of ‘giving back’ which continues outside of formal initiatives (for example, one employee started a clothing drive for abused women trying to get back into the workforce) We offered time off to support volunteer commitments, but very few employees took us up on it. This age group (mostly under 40s) are so focused on work/family that they don’t feel they have the time to devote to volunteering
  • 16. WHAT WE’VE LEARNED SO FAR With only a handful of initiatives under our belt, we still feel that we are very much at the beginning of our corproate ‘giving back’ project, so we hesitate to draw too many hard-and-fast conclusions based on our experiences and employee responses to date. However, we have learned some lessons in the past 15 months: Employees tend to be more enthusiastic when they are working for a cause they believe in (rather than one which has been imposed from the top down) Initiatives which get everyone involved tend to be more successful than those which are tied to some other factor (Do Your Own Thing was more successful than Every Hour Counts – because DYOT required individual participation) It’s very important to avoid the appearance of ‘forcing’ participation, because this can cause even previously enthusiastic participants to feel negative It’s imperative for senior leadership to set the tone – and the example. The Do Your Own Thing initiative had a slow start – until a couple of senior leadership team members initiated their own activities It’s imperative for senior leadership to appear involved (if there’s a clothing drive, they should bring donations; if there is a bowlathon, they need to show up). When senior players don’t participate, employees become cynical (“Oh, I guess this was a publicity stunt after all – they don’t really care about this stuff at all…”) and the program can lose momentum Don’t expect the charities involved to care about what you’re doing. We initially thought that the local organizations especially would be excited about what we were doing. They weren’t. We don’t know whether this was because they didn’t really understand what we were doing, or whether the dollar amounts involved were simply too low, or whether they are leery of aligning with a for-profit organization. Either way, don’t expect a lot of support or enthusiasm from this channel Expect to be in this for the long-term. Don’t expect that one month-long initiative is going to change your corporate culture
  • 17. forever, or that employees will immediately get on board. Don’t blame them – it’s tough not to be cynical in this economy! If you continue to implement, encourage and support grassroots giving back initiatives – and if senior leadership sets an example – you’ll eventually see a workforce who is fully committed to the idea and wholeheartedly participates. There will be demonstrable business benefits in the long-term. Head2Head has low turnover (which is particularly good given our industry and the relative youth of our employee base) and high employee engagement rates. We know that the H2H Gives Back program is one of the reasons for this. Can we draw a straight line from our initiatives to ROI yet? No – but we fully expect to be able to in the future.
  • 18. CONCLUSIONS Our original purpose in preparing this document was to help other small and mid-sized organizations chart their own path in terms of creating, establishing and tracking a grassroots giving back program. With that in mind, we offer the following conclusions: Employee engagement has a demonstrable effect on the bottom line Grassroots ‘giving back’ programs are the form of corporate philanthropy most likely to have a positive effect on employee engagement In today's marketplace, organizations can not hope to establish themselves as 'best in class' unless they have some kind of formalized grassroots giving back program (distinct from whatever big corporate sponsorship may be taking place at a C-suite level) The actual dollar value of the money raised isn't particularly important. Employees will be more excited about $250, if they helped raise it themselves, than they will be about $250,000 in which they had no participation The impact on recruiting and HR In the current recruiting and talent marketplace, it's more important than ever to (a) secure the best talent (because if you've laid off a lot of workers, you need the remaining employees to be top performers); and (b) keep recruiting costs to a minimum by mobilizing a strong recruitment brand and network. So there's no better time to create and establish a grassroots giving back program. The money and resources spent on this now will deliver demonstrable cost, quality and efficiency metrics in the long-term.
  • 19. ABOUT HEAD2HEAD With a network of more than 4000 recruitment consultants across Canada, and more than 350 clients – including market leaders such as Microsoft, Virgin Mobile, Accenture and Effem , Head2Head is North America’s leading provider of on-site recruiters. Since 2000, Head2Head has been providing innovative recruiting solutions informed by some of the best recruiting thinking in the industry. Our Recruiter2Recruiter.ca is the only online resource created especially for Canadian recruiting professionals, featuring articles, tools and templates designed to help recruiters look like rockstars and organizations get the most out of their recruitment function. For more information about this report, or any other information about Head2Head, please contact: Sarah Welstead Director, User Experience Head2Head Inc. 31 Davisville Avenue Toronto, ON M4S 1G3 416.440.2043 sarah@head2head.ca Check us out online: Follow us on Twitter! http://twitter.com/RecruitingH2H Get HotJobs on our Facebook application: http://tinyurl.com/H2HFacebook Read the blog: http://www.head2head.ca/blog.php

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