Confident And Connected Keynote Web Version

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A keynote that looks at being part of a connected world, how classrooms are making connections (based around the key competencies in the New Zealand curriculum), and issues that need to be considered when working online in education.

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  • Thanks Susie. Great stuff
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  • Using QA teachers and students can interact with other users through avatar movements, text chat, email, telegrams and bulletin boards. Using dynamic abilities of avatar enables students to express themselves through non-verbal signs like giggle, hug, dance, clap etc. Students even communicate with virtual characters, for example Council members, which means they are real to them and that students consider them as friends (Barab et al, 2005).Collaborative learning in virtual environment involves positive interdependence and mutual responsibility for successful solving quests. That makes it essential to use politeness strategies in online communication. Studies suggest that in computer mediated communication there are two basic rules of communicative competence: make yourself clear and be polite. Students intend to write messages that are more direct and they wish to establish a close relationship based on enhancing group cohesion and friendship (Vinagre, 2008).
  • • Are school managements sufficiently informed as to what their staff are doing in online spaces and is there well thought out accountability internally? • Is the online work part of an intentional, well designed school or cluster development that has included the consideration of ethical education for the 21st century and the ethical responsibilities of the various members of the learning community
  • The 'walled garden' community are very cautious about the whole online thing with their children and are reluctant to have them on the internet, most concerned about their images and content being online, and even request directly that their children are not included in any online spaces - including the school website. My belief is that these parents have a right to have this attitude and if you have chosen to work in this community it is up to you to make it work! Parent education and involvement is an obvious starting place, but in the meantime you are obligated to respect their wishes and work within the 'walled garden'. Hopefully they would accept password protected web spaces, students represented by avatars and pseudonyms etc, but it is their call. The 'go-fer-it' community at the opposite end of the spectrum do exist! As a community they 'get' Web 2 and enjoy it. They are proud of their children when they see them online and support them gaining a measure of online 'fame' through their online identities. (BTW, I am taking it for granted that, despite this open attitude, the school is working within 'Netsafe' boundaries with things like first names only, no phone numbers and addresses etc). I believe that the challenge for teachers with this level of trust and freedom is to constantly be evaluating ethics and behaving responsibly online and not just 'winging' it. Continuing to remember that with freedom comes responsibilities. And to continue to keep the community well informed of new directions the students/class/school are taking - as there always will be the next new thing. The 'yes - but' community are anywhere on the continuum between the other two and they deserve ongoing education and information. They may well agree to one situation, eg happy to have the class blogging, but have uncertainties about another online environment. Every community has the right to be completely informed about what their children are doing and where their learning is taking place, but this group may respond particularly well to regular opportunities to come into school to see the students demonstrate their learning and hear from the teacher the thinking behind what is happening. And of course the more they are invited to be involved as a contributing audience the greater the buy in is likely to be. In the early days of eLearning I held 'open class' once a term from 3pm till 9pm where the students could bring in their extended families and show them online, and using the data projector if they wished, what they had been learning. And of course the parents were welcome to talk to me as well, but the emphasis was on the students informally presenting. In my last year of doing this I had so many come in that we set up a mini theatre and one child brought in the neighbours as well as the whanau to look at his work. Finally, if I was changing jobs I would be asking questions about community attitudes to 21st century learning before I bought into the job - some things take a lot of energy to change!
  • • No below 13's are the account holder. • The teacher must be the account holder and must use RSS to subscribe to any additions and comments on their own laptop as well as someone in the school or cluster management subscribing using RSS so that all updates are monitored exactly as we would treat the 20th Century traditional work of students. • When a school signs up/registers to use Google Apps for Education, item 1 to note is that obviously Google expect students to use the apps. Item 2 to note is that its the school that signs up and thus takes responsibility for all content and use thereafter and must have its own internal protocols to manage this. I think this is the model we should follow for all online apps we are using for for learning in the direct school context.
  • • No below 13's are the account holder. • The teacher must be the account holder and must use RSS to subscribe to any additions and comments on their own laptop as well as someone in the school or cluster management subscribing using RSS so that all updates are monitored exactly as we would treat the 20th Century traditional work of students. • When a school signs up/registers to use Google Apps for Education, item 1 to note is that obviously Google expect students to use the apps. Item 2 to note is that its the school that signs up and thus takes responsibility for all content and use thereafter and must have its own internal protocols to manage this. I think this is the model we should follow for all online apps we are using for for learning in the direct school context.
  • • Accounts for web 2 apps are used to support learning from the school. • Accounts should be registered using a school based email address. i.e the user will be [email_address] . This being the case, the work is owned by the school. There is a sense of dual ownership with the author, but policy clearly states that the use of a school email address brings responsibilities with it. • The Teacher is never the sole account administrator. A member of the management always has dual account admin along with the teacher. This safeguards the school if the teacher leaves or if some other issue arises.
  • If the pages are able to be easily monitored the kids have made them public rather than private. We have an ethical responsibility to teach our students about the mayhem this can cause for themselves or others. (You would hope parents would be shouldering this responsibility as well) The same is applicable to staff. If the school or cluster has a clearly stated kawa with respect to the damaging effect of certain kinds of social networking and it is made plain that public personae will be monitored from time to time for their impact on self and others and the reputation of family, community and the school, then we have every right to challenge these things appropriately when they occur. My own personal approach is to go up to a student and say "I've seen your Bebo Page, I don't think your nanna would like it, I'll give you two days to fix it." Every one of those pages has been fixed over night with zero fuss and bother. I notice an increasing number of staff who are becoming active in social networking environments, not discriminating between their public and private persona. Some are expressing personal opinions or giving personal information in the context of a class or student blog. Once again, there needs to be in school and/or in cluster discussion around the issue of appropriate boundaries between professional and private life.
  • Confident And Connected Keynote Web Version

    1. Connected and confident <ul><li>An educational perspective on </li></ul><ul><li>being part of an online world </li></ul>Keynote by Suzie Vesper - CORE Education
    2. This is the web version of a keynote speech. The writing in yellow has been added to help the viewer understand the content on the slides. Contact me if you would like a copy of some slides without the yellow guidance text.
    3. Our connected world Our connected classrooms Considerations when connecting These are the three main areas that will be focused on during this keynote.
    4. Our connected world
    5. How Twitter can make history Clay Shirky’s TED talk This video by Clay Shirky gives an overview of how the internet has changed the way people can interact. Clay Shirky
    6. Connected World Case Study - Iran Election Iran Election
    7. We witnessed police spraying pepper gas into the eyes of peaceful female protesters Once again I thank everyone in the world. No matter if Ahmadi stays or not, I'm proud to have clasped such supportive hands. Tens of thousands of protestors are chanting &quot;No fear, No fear, we are with each other&quot;. Twitter gave the people within an Iran a voice that couldn’t be controlled by the state. Iran Election
    8. Three days later The internet also has the power to bring people together to take collective action for Iran Iran Election
    9. School In a connected world, schools can’t afford to ignore the possibilities the internet now delivers. World
    10. Schools need to make connections beyond the classroom walls and experience the power of bringing the world into the classroom. World School
    11. Our connected classrooms
    12. The series of slides that follow are all examples of ways schools are connecting based around the key competencies. There is a hyperlink to take you to the online example being demonstrated at the bottom of each of the slides.
    13. Using language, symbols and texts <ul><li>Students recognise how choices of language, symbol, or text affect people’s understanding and the ways in which they respond to communications. They confidently use ICT (including, where appropriate, assistive technologies) to access and provide information and to communicate with others. </li></ul>
    14. Pt England Rm 18 blog - Rm 18 are hiring Class advertise for maternity leave teacher
    15. Teacher responds to advertisement and is hired Pt England Rm 18 blog - Rm 18 have hired
    16. Room 7 Paparoa St Podcast Channel Interview with White Island Eruption Rescue Team Sharing role plays on topic of natural disasters through podcasts. Viewers have many options to continue sharing and being kept up-to-date. Room 7 Podcast Channel
    17. What was the impact for those students in being connected? What do you see as the possibilities in your own classroom practice? Discussion Point
    18. Managing Self <ul><li>Students who manage themselves are enterprising, resourceful, reliable, and resilient. They establish personal goals, make plans, manage projects, and set high standards. They have strategies for meeting challenges. </li></ul>
    19. Community Rights Inquiry Wiki Buckland Beach Intermediate Bucklands Beach Intermediate Community Rights inquiry wiki The pupils analyse local issues and each group decides to take an area of study for their inquiry topics related to homelessness.
    20. Action Plan We found out that the Auckland City Mission always has a need for good quality items. We have arranged for blanket bins to be put around the school with our DP and will go onto our school TV programme to explain. The next three slides are a summary of what one group had on their inquiry wiki.
    21. Timeline Draft a letter to the Auckland City Council 3rd Sept 5th Sept Receive a reply from the council (included) 6th Sept Go onto the school Daily Broadcast to talk about the project and bins. 7th Sept Check bins. Ask if this can be announced again in assembly. Ask fabric teacher if we can borrow sewing machines to make blankets. Team member to ask businesses to donate material.
    22. Ongoing Teacher Comments You have done a really good job at getting started on this. Your brainstorm identifies some important issues that obviously have to be addressed. You may like to look at this in a little more detail... 20.8.07 30.8.07 It was good working with your group today. You are all on task and you have a clear idea of what you are doing and how to develop your plan of action. You may want to use a flow chart for this... 7.09.07 Your letter asking for sponsorship of fabric was well written. I am very proud of you all. Keep up the good work.
    23. Children’s Reflective Log I think our wiki is going well on the first day with all members contributing. 20th Aug 27th Aug I think that our wiki is going well, but we ha to change some of our questions. Everyone is contributing and adding to our wiki. 7th Sept We are really getting into our work. Our planning is all finished and we can finally get down to some action. 18th Sept Today’s action went extremely well! We learned heaps and the ACM were very pleased with our donations.
    24. Reflecting on an inquiry process Bucklands Beach Intermediate Voicethread reflection This is a reflection on how the group worked and what tools helped them to be more efficient.
    25. What was the impact for those students in being connected? What do you see as the possibilities in your own classroom practice? Discussion Point
    26. Relating to Others <ul><li>Students who relate well to others are open to new learning and able to take different roles in different situations. They are aware of how their words and actions affect others. They know when it is appropriate to compete and when it is appropriate to co-operate. </li></ul>
    27. Cyber citizenship Working with students to develop rules and guidelines for working online is an important part of being a connected classroom.
    28. Blog Rules 1.  Never post anything personal .  No last names, phone numbers, addresses or birthdays.      2.  Always use appropriate language ; after all, this is still a school activity! 3.  Respect your classmates and their ideas.  Just like in class, we never put people down.  If you disagree, do so with respect and kindness. Cyber citizenship St Andrew’s Middle School DigiMax 09 blog
    29. 4.   Best spellings  are required.  This is not myspace!  Spell out words as correctly as you can and try to use proper punctuation. Go back and 'Edit Entry' later if you realise there is a mistake, or someone else mentions it to you. 5.  Practice, practice, practice .  For the rest of your life you will be expected to use computers.  If you are not used to it yet, that is okay!  You are allowed to make mistakes and you are allowed to ask for help.  Just keep practicing! 6. In classtime you may only write posts . Save the comment writing and the changing of screen settings for at home.
    30. There are now new areas for interaction online such as purpose designed virtual worlds where students can interact with the world and each other to complete challenges while learning along the way.
    31. Quest Atlantis Education in a virtual world Quest Atlantis website Quest Atlantis Immersive Learning Environment video on YouTube
    32. As an active Quester you will become part of an international community of students. Talk to and share your ideas with Questers in Malaysia, Turkey, Australia, Canada, New Zealand, China, and different parts of the United States.
    33. The following slide has the guidelines students are expected to follow within Quest Atlantis on how to behave and interact. It also shows the three different ways interaction can occur.
    34. I nclude Everyone B e careful sharing U se good words R espect others S upport all T alk to someone new Chat Email Bulletin Boards
    35. Senior students have been using the virtual world Quest Atlantis programme at Glamorgan School. Students were surveyed about the experience and these are their responses.
    36.  
    37. What was the impact for those students in being connected? What do you see as the possibilities in your own classroom practice? Discussion Point
    38. Participating and Contributing <ul><li>Students who participate and contribute in communities have a sense of belonging and the confidence to participate, contribute appropriately as a group member, make connections with others, and create opportunities for others. Communities may be local, national, or global. </li></ul>
    39. Participating through blogs Grade 1 Teacher in the US This video demonstrates the power of two schools connecting and interacting with each other - one in the US and one in New Zealand. Telling the New Story video on YouTube
    40. Inclusive education with Skype Arisley School in the US This video shows the power of being able to bring children into the classroom that would otherwise not be able to participate. Learning is Messy blog - Celeste and Skype
    41. What was the impact for those students in being connected? What do you see as the possibilities in your own classroom practice? Discussion Point
    42. Thinking <ul><li>Students who are competent thinkers and problem-solvers actively seek, use, and create knowledge. They reflect on their own learning, draw on personal knowledge and intuitions, ask questions, and challenge the basis of assumptions and perceptions. </li></ul>
    43. Islands around the world project Compare and Contrast Exercise Islands Around the World wiki Students took information provided by students at a collaborative partner school and examined the similarities and differences between them.
    44. Many Voices on Darfor Collaborative Voicethread Project In this Voicethread project, students think deeply about the issues and build on each other’s ideas. Many Voices on Darfur VoiceThread project
    45. Examples of student comments in the VoiceThread
    46.  
    47.  
    48. What was the impact for those students in being connected? What do you see as the possibilities in your own classroom practice? Discussion Point
    49. Considerations when connecting ?
    50. Many people consider the ‘internet predator’ as the main threat but this isn’t borne out by research. Schools should still take precautions but should also focus on issues that are increasingly becoming more important such as cyberbullying and other ethical considerations.
    51.  
    52. The next slide is a summary of some of the thinking on Dorothy Burt’s blog around making sure any use of online tools is purposeful and keeps the learning needs of students at the forefront.
    53. <ul><li>Why work online at all? </li></ul><ul><li>Write an action plan with learning outcomes at the top for you and leaders </li></ul><ul><li>Can visitors to your space tell from the home page what the purpose is? </li></ul>http://manaiakalani.blogspot.com / Dorothy Burt’s Blog
    54. The next slide shows the normal process a school goes through when considering internet safety issues. While this goes some way to addressing issues, there are other ethical considerations that schools should discuss and create policies around before going ‘online’ and these are addressed in the rest of the slides in this section.
    55. We need to ensure we have considered internet safety in our school Visit Netsafe and download sample policies and permission forms. <ul><li>Adapt for our school and get forms signed: </li></ul><ul><li>First names only </li></ul><ul><li>Photos with permission </li></ul><ul><li>No other personal details published </li></ul>
    56. Ethical Issues for when working online Based on a forum post by Russell Burt and republished online with permission at: http://learningweb2.wikispaces.com/Important+considerations
    57. Issue One: Place of online tools within school learning framework
    58. A teacher goes to an e-learning conference and learns about blogging in education
    59. Board of Trustees We weren’t aware of that. We’ll shut it down while we look into it. School management She returns and starts a blog but a parent isn’t happy about this and complains to the who ask for information from
    60. The blog is removed while the school looks at the issues. The teacher, who started off being very enthusiastic is now demotivated and upset at the outcome.
    61. How could this outcome have been improved for all involved? Discussion Point
    62. Issue One: Possible ways forward
    63. “ Any online work should be part of an intentional, well designed school development that has included the consideration of ethical education for the 21st century and the ethical responsibilities of the various members of the learning community. Management should be informed and there should be well thought out accountability internally” Russell Burt
    64. Senior staff Staff working with children online Awareness Management Communication Consultation
    65. You also need to work with the school community and may need to start with a more ‘locked down’ model if that is what they are comfortable with. Through education and consultation you can move forward with the community alongside. Dorothy Burt’s has a blog post about the different types of school community which is linked to on the next slide.
    66. <ul><li>The 'walled garden' community </li></ul><ul><li>The 'go-fer-it' community </li></ul><ul><li>The 'yes - but' community </li></ul>http://manaiakalani.blogspot.com / Dorothy Burt’s Blog
    67. Issue Two: Age restrictions on online tools
    68. A teacher goes to an e-learning conference and learns about setting up a Wetpaint wiki
    69. Account Account Account Account Account Account She sets up an account for herself and has each student set up an account so she track who is editing the wiki.
    70. 13 years + Then a parent points out the the students are too young to set up an account (according to the terms and conditions of Wetpaint) All student accounts have be be deleted and the teacher puts wikis into the ‘too hard’ basket
    71. How could this outcome have been improved for all involved? Discussion Point
    72. Issue Two: Possible ways forward
    73. Teacher account The teacher is the account holder and logs students in to work on the wiki.
    74. Teacher subscribes through RSS to all comments and additions to the site in order to monitor changes
    75. Issue Three: Ownership and life span of online materials
    76. A teacher sets up a blog everyone is happy and
    77. The teacher leaves the school
    78. Login details ? But the school does not have the login for the blog.
    79. The content relating to that student is still online. The school has no access to remove it and the teacher is no longer blogging and doesn’t visit it.
    80. H a H H a a The content is found by a fellow student at high school. Today I learned to work well with boys.
    81. Check out what this loser from our high school posted online when she was at primary school!! And is distributed by social networks and cell phone Today I learned to work well with boys. Today I learned to work well with boys.
    82. Or the student could want the content removed for other reasons as the author of what is posted online but there is no way for them to have it removed.
    83. How could this outcome have been improved for all involved? Discussion Point
    84. Issue Three: Possible ways forward
    85. [email_address] Teacher account Dual account holder Require teachers to set up classroom accounts using their school emails and have passwords on file. Have a dual account holder from senior management.
    86. Decide as a staff at which point content posted online about students will be taken down and make sure that this policy is followed.
    87. Issue Four: Professional vs private Privacy vs public
    88. The following slides are examples of issues that can arise when the line is crossed between personal and professional.
    89. 13 NZ teachers deregistered in 2008 Teachers had little understanding of professional boundaries. Many of them began inappropriate relationships as a result of text messaging
    90. Teacher under investigation Teacher updated Twitter with up to 30 messages a day discussing her pupils. May 2009
    91. Teacher suspended for Facebook photo Teacher suspended after photos of her with weapons (legal) appeared on her profile page Feb 2009
    92. Young teacher advised on Facebook Christchurch teacher had students asking to be his friend on Facebook. Advised that this stretches boundaries and could be dangerous July 2008
    93. Four dio girls suspended Four students stood down for making derogatory comments on Facebook about a teacher and a student. School said it had a huge responsibility to educate girls on acceptable communication. June 2009
    94. Where should the lines be drawn? Should teachers and students be entitled to put what they want on their personal online spaces? Discussion Point
    95. Issue Four: Possible ways forward
    96. Have discussions with staff and with students and create approriate policies
    97. Issue Five: Keeping it real How do we help students understand the importance of identity and what personas are appropriate to use in online contexts? Issue Six: Anonymity Online When is it appropriate to be anonymous and when is it potentially harmful? Not explored in-depth in this keynote
    98. Issues Risks 21stC Connected Confident The benefits outweigh the downsides if policies are in place.
    99. So let’s not do continue to do things in old ways when we can be using new technologies to revolutionise teaching and learning. 15th Century Email YouTube Video

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