ALTERNATE METHOD TO COMBINE MONITORED AND PREDICTED CONCENTRATIONS IN DISPERSION MODELING DEMONSTRATIONS

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The advent of the short term NAAQS has prompted us to reassess the level of conservatism commonly used in dispersion modeling analyses. An area of conservatism in NAAQS demonstrations relates to the combining of predicted (modeled) concentrations from AERMOD with observed (monitored) concentrations. Normally, some of the highest monitored observations are combined with AERMOD results yielding a very conservative total concentration. For example, in the case of the 1-hour NO2 NAAQS, the chances of the 98th percentile monitored concentration occurring at the same time as the meteorology to generate the 98th percentile ambient concentration is extremely low. Therefore, assuming that both of these happen at the same time is overly conservative.
This presentation includes justification for the use of a reasonable background concentration to combine with the AERMOD predicted concentration. The use of this method, if accepted by regulatory agencies, can help facilities demonstrate compliance in dispersion modeling analyses by assuming a more reasonable background concentration while, at the same time being protective of the NAAQS.

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ALTERNATE METHOD TO COMBINE MONITORED AND PREDICTED CONCENTRATIONS IN DISPERSION MODELING DEMONSTRATIONS

  1. 1. ALTERNATE METHOD TO COMBINE MONITORED AND PREDICTED CONCENTRATIONS IN DISPERSION MODELING DEMONSTRATIONS MPCA Air Quality Dispersion Modeling Guidance: Modeling Practice & Experience Information Session December 18, 2013 Sergio A. Guerra - Wenck Associates, Inc.
  2. 2. Roadmap of Presentation • What is background? • How is background selected? • How can we select a reasonable background value without compromising the protection of the NAAQS?
  3. 3. Challenge of new short-term NAAQS
  4. 4. Probabilistic Ambient Standards Appendix W: 9.1.2 Studies of Model Accuracy a. A number of studies have been conducted to examine model accuracy, particularly with respect to the reliability of short-term concentrations required for ambient standard and increment evaluations. The results of these studies are not surprising. Basically, they confirm what expert atmospheric scientists have said for some time: (1) Models are more reliable for estimating longer time-averaged concentrations than for estimating short-term concentrations at specific locations; and (2) the models are reasonably reliable in estimating the magnitude of highest concentrations occurring sometime, somewhere within an area. For example, errors in highest estimated concentrations of ± 10 to 40 percent are found to be typical, i.e., certainly well within the often quoted factor-of-two accuracy that has long been recognized for these models. However, estimates of concentrations that occur at a specific time and site, are poorly correlated with actually observed concentrations and are much less reliable. • • Bowne, N.E. and R.J. Londergan, 1983. Overview, Results, and Conclusions for the EPRI Plume Model Validation and Development Project: Plains Site. EPRI EA–3074. Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA. Moore, G.E., T.E. Stoeckenius and D.A. Stewart, 1982. A Survey of Statistical Measures of Model Performance and Accuracy for Several Air Quality Models. Publication No. EPA–450/4–83–001. Office of Air Quality Planning & Standards, Research Triangle Park, NC.
  5. 5. Normal Distribution http://www.agilegeoscience.com
  6. 6. Gaussian Dispersion Model
  7. 7. Definition of Background Concentration According to Appendix W background concentrations are defined as follows: 8.2 Background Concentrations 8.2.1 Discussion a. Background concentrations are an essential part of the total air quality concentration to be considered in determining source impacts. Background air quality includes pollutant concentrations due to: (1) Natural sources; (2) nearby sources other than the one(s) currently under consideration; and (3) unidentified sources. 8.2.2 Recommendations (Isolated Single Source) b. Use air quality data collected in the vicinity of the source to determine the background concentration for the averaging times of concern. Determine the mean background concentration at each monitor by excluding values when the source in question is impacting the monitor. The mean annual background is the average of the annual concentrations so determined at each monitor. For shorter averaging periods, the meteorological conditions accompanying the concentrations of concern should be identified. Concentrations for meteorological conditions of concern, at monitors not impacted by the source in question, should be averaged for each separate averaging time to determine the average background value. Monitoring sites inside a 90° sector downwind of the source may be used to determine the area of impact. (Appendix W, emphasis added) • U.S. EPA. (2005). “Guideline on Air Quality Models.” 40 CFR Part 51 Appendix W.
  8. 8. Example Tracer (SF6) Array Probability analyses of combining background concentrations with model-predicted concentrations Douglas R. Murray, Michael B. Newman Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association Vol. 64, Iss. 3, 2014
  9. 9. Kincaid Power Station and 28 SO2 Monitors Probability analyses of combining background concentrations with model-predicted concentrations Douglas R. Murray, Michael B. Newman Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association Vol. 64, Iss. 3, 2014
  10. 10. SO2 Concentrations Paired in Time & Space Probability analyses of combining background concentrations with model-predicted concentrations Douglas R. Murray, Michael B. Newman Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association Vol. 64, Iss. 3, 2014
  11. 11. SO2 Concentrations Paired in Time Only Probability analyses of combining background concentrations with model-predicted concentrations Douglas R. Murray, Michael B. Newman Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association Vol. 64, Iss. 3, 2014
  12. 12. Summary of Tracer and SO2 Observed Outside 90° Downwind Sector Probability analyses of combining background concentrations with model-predicted concentrations Douglas R. Murray, Michael B. Newman Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association Vol. 64, Iss. 3, 2014
  13. 13. Example Tracer (SF6) Array Probability analyses of combining background concentrations with model-predicted concentrations Douglas R. Murray, Michael B. Newman Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association Vol. 64, Iss. 3, 2014
  14. 14. Sitting of Ambient Monitors According to the Ambient Monitoring Guidelines for Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD): The existing monitoring data should be representative of three types of area: 1) The location(s) of maximum concentration increase from the proposed source or modification; 2) The location(s) of the maximum air pollutant concentration from existing sources; and 3) The location(s) of the maximum impact area, i.e., where the maximum pollutant concentration would hypothetically occur based on the combined effect of existing sources and the proposed source or modification. (EPA, 1987) U.S. EPA. (1987). “Ambient Monitoring Guidelines for Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD).”EPA‐450/4‐87‐007, Research Triangle Park, NC.
  15. 15. Rosemount Monitors
  16. 16. Current Approach • For 1-hr NO2 and 24-hour PM2.5* • Combine the 98th predicted concentration (from AERMOD) with the 98th percentile monitored concentration (from ambinet monitor) • For 1-hour SO2 • Combine the 99th percentile concentration (from AERMOD) with the 99th percentile monitored concentration (from ambinet monitor)
  17. 17. Hit it Big!!! Example • You have 2 chances out of 100 to win the Powerball. Or you have 98 chances out of a 100 of not winning the power ball. • You have 2 chances out of 100 to win the Mega Millions. Or you have 98 chances out of a 100 of not winning the Mega Millions. • What are the chances of winning both the Powerball and the Mega Millions?
  18. 18. Marginal Probability P(PB ∩ Mega) = P(PB) * P(Mega) Where: P(PB ∩ Mega)= the marginal probability of winning the PowerBall and at the same time winning the Mega. P(PB) = the marginal probability of winning the Powerball (98th percentile). P(Mega) = the marginal probability of winning the Mega (98th percentile).
  19. 19. Probability of Winning both Lottos P(PB ∩ Mega) = P(PB) * P(Mega) = (1-0.98) * (1-0.98) = (0.02) * (0.02) = (1/50) * (1/50) = 0.0004 = 1 / 2,500 = 99.96th percentile of the combined distribution
  20. 20. Combining 98th percentile Pre and Bkg (1-hr NO2 and 24-hr PM2.5) P(Pre ∩ Bkg) = P(Pre) * P(Bkg) = (1-0.98) * (1-0.98) = (0.02) * (0.02) = 0.0004 = 1 / 2,500 Equivalent to one exceedance every 6.8 years! = 99.96th percentile of the combined distribution
  21. 21. Combining 99th percentile Pre and Bkg (1-hr SO2) P(Pre ∩ Bkg) = P(Pre) * P(Bkg) = (1-0.99) * (1-0.99) = (0.01) * (0.01) = 0.0001 = 1 / 10,000 Equivalent to one exceedance every 27 years! = 99.99th percentile of the combined distribution
  22. 22. Proposed Approach to Combine Modeled and Monitored Concentrations • Combining the 98th (or 99th for 1-hr SO2) % monitored concentration with the 98th % predicted concentration is too conservative. • A more reasonable approach is to use a monitored value closer to the main distribution (i.e., the median). Evaluation of the SO2 and NOX offset ratio method to account for secondary PM2.5 formation Sergio A. Guerra, Shannon R. Olsen, Jared J. Anderson Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association Vol. 64, Iss. 3, 2014
  23. 23. Combining 98th Pre and 50th Bkg P(Pre ∩ Bkg) = P(Pre) * P(Bkg) = (1-0.98) * (1-0.50) = (0.02) * (0.50) = 0.01 = 1 / 100 = 99th percentile of the combined distribution Evaluation of the SO2 and NOX offset ratio method to account for secondary PM2.5 formation Sergio A. Guerra, Shannon R. Olsen, Jared J. Anderson Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association Vol. 64, Iss. 3, 2014
  24. 24. Combining 99th Pre and 50th Bkg P(Pre ∩ Bkg) = P(Pre) * P(Bkg) = (1-0.99) * (1-0.50) = (0.01) * (0.50) = 0.005 = 1 / 200 = 99.5th percentile of the combined distribution Evaluation of the SO2 and NOX offset ratio method to account for secondary PM2.5 formation Sergio A. Guerra, Shannon R. Olsen, Jared J. Anderson Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association Vol. 64, Iss. 3, 2014
  25. 25. Evaluation • Representativeness • Screen out any exceptional events, equipment errors/malfunction • Use the highest 3-year data set from the latest 5 year period
  26. 26. Normal Distribution http://www.agilegeoscience.com
  27. 27. Positively Skewed Distribution http://www.agilegeoscience.com
  28. 28. 24-hr PM2.5 observations at Shakopee 2008-2010 Evaluation of the SO2 and NOX offset ratio method to account for secondary PM2.5 formation Sergio A. Guerra, Shannon R. Olsen, Jared J. Anderson Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association Vol. 64, Iss. 3, 2014
  29. 29. 1-hr NO2 observations at IGH 2008-2010.
  30. 30. Exceptional Events http://blogs.mprnews.org/updraft/2012/06/co_smoke_plume_now_visible_abo/
  31. 31. Exceptional Events
  32. 32. Exceptional Events
  33. 33. 24-hr PM2.5 Santa Fe, NM Airport Background Concentration and Methods to Establish Background Concentrations in Modeling. Presented at the Guideline on Air Quality Models: The Path Forward. Raleigh, NC, 2013. Bruce Nicholson
  34. 34. Conclusion • Most of the ambient monitors available are not representative of regional background • Combining the 98th % monitored value with the 98th % predicted value is overly conservative • Use of 50th % monitiored concentration is statistically conservative when pairing it with the 98th (or 99th) % predicted concentration • Method is simple and statistically sound • Method is protective of the NAAQS while providing a reasonable level of conservatism
  35. 35. QUESTIONS… Sergio A. Guerra, PhD Environmental Engineer Phone: (952) 837-3340 sguerra@wenck.com

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