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This work is supported by a National Science Foundation (NSF) collaboration between the
Directorates for Education and Hum...
Rubric Webinar Leaders
Josh Caulkins
InTeGrate
Assessment Team
Kaatje Kraft
Mesa Community College
Geology Faculty
Goals of this webinar
• Describe how rubrics can support student
learning.
• Identify key elements in a rubric that are
us...
From the Curriculum Development rubric:
Learning Objectives & Goals
Instructions and/or rubrics provide guidance for how
s...
From survey responses:
• All of you have at least some experience with rubrics, to
mixed levels of success for:
– Writing ...
What is a rubric?
• Concise criteria for an assignment/project (in
writing)
• Makes explicit the instructors expectations ...
The key?
• Rubrics MUST be specific for the assignment
– Have clear and measurable learning objectives for
your assignment...
Mystery Box Activity
Did student self-evaluate their essay (complete the rubric [+1] and justify with an
explanation on back/at end of paper [+...
Example Assignment
Black Canyon City (BCC) Application Exercise
• Context: Your friend comes to you excited about a new in...
Peer Review
• Having students use the rubric to do a peer
review results in:
– A stronger final product
– Students learnin...
Trait Excellent Good Needs Work PR Actions
Claim (What is
happening, is this
a good or bad
idea, etc…)
Clearly &
accuratel...
A B C D F
Claim Clearly & accurately
identifies the type(s)
of mass wasting and
the geology.
Accurately identifies
the typ...
Simple Rubrics
• Rubrics can be for very quick and basic
assignments
• Example: Reading Reflection (reading assignment
out...
Simple Rubrics
• Rubrics can be for very quick and basic
assignments
Reading Reflection Rubric
Geology Mapping
Rubric
Tips and considerations
• Rubrics can always be better with revision
• There will always be exceptions within a rubric
• A...
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Rubric presentation

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This powerpoint was put together by Kaatje Kraft with assistance from Joshua Caulkins. The powerpoint gives an overview of rubrics, why faculty use them and how they are useful to students. Many examples are described.

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  1. 1. This work is supported by a National Science Foundation (NSF) collaboration between the Directorates for Education and Human Resources (EHR) and Geociences (GEO) under grant DUE - 1125331 Rubrics Professional Development Webinar The webinar begins at: 10 am PST | 11 am MST | 12 pm CST | 1 pm EST For audio, call: 1-800-704-9804 (or 1-404-920-6604 if you cannot use the toll free number) Access Code: 576 5 464 Press *6 to mute and unmute
  2. 2. Rubric Webinar Leaders Josh Caulkins InTeGrate Assessment Team Kaatje Kraft Mesa Community College Geology Faculty
  3. 3. Goals of this webinar • Describe how rubrics can support student learning. • Identify key elements in a rubric that are useful for a given assignment. • Start drafting rubrics for assessments in your own courses
  4. 4. From the Curriculum Development rubric: Learning Objectives & Goals Instructions and/or rubrics provide guidance for how students meet learning goals Assessment and Measurement Assessments are criterion referenced
  5. 5. From survey responses: • All of you have at least some experience with rubrics, to mixed levels of success for: – Writing assignments – Homework assignments – Class projects • Challenges with rubrics: – The translation between instructor goals and actual outcomes aren’t always matched – Students don’t read them • Benefits of rubrics: – Streamlines the grading process – Makes expectations clear for students – Reflects the values of an assignment (where should the emphasis be)
  6. 6. What is a rubric? • Concise criteria for an assignment/project (in writing) • Makes explicit the instructors expectations for the students • Helps instructor develop clear learning objectives
  7. 7. The key? • Rubrics MUST be specific for the assignment – Have clear and measurable learning objectives for your assignment – Use language that students understand – Provide models for students to apply the rubric/have practice with the rubric – Avoid non-measurable terms (e.g., imaginative, creative) – Can be numeric specific or general ranges
  8. 8. Mystery Box Activity
  9. 9. Did student self-evaluate their essay (complete the rubric [+1] and justify with an explanation on back/at end of paper [+2])? Yes No Integrates explanation with consideration (and possible refutation) of alternative explanations Integrates explanation with some consideration of alternative explanations Alternate explanations addressed, but not clearly integrated Mentions alternate explanations No alternate explanations Points on the x-axis Content components on the y-axis
  10. 10. Example Assignment Black Canyon City (BCC) Application Exercise • Context: Your friend comes to you excited about a new investment possibility. The growth potential in the BCC area (Arizona) is growing rapidly, and there is a proposal to put up high scale developments on the bluffs overlooking the town. They ask if you want in on the investment from the ground up. Is this a sound investment? Why or why not? • Content Requirements: Based on your knowledge from the La Ventana Landslide system, determine what recommendations you'd make by making an advisement "report," including the following: • An overview of the geology of the region. • The possibility of mass wasting movement and what type. • What factors might contribute to movement and what evidence you have to support those claims. • How increased development might affect this system. • Possible mitigation options (if any are appropriate). • What you recommend your friend to do with your money and his/her own.
  11. 11. Peer Review • Having students use the rubric to do a peer review results in: – A stronger final product – Students learning more from each other – Engaging with the rubric prior to the final draft – Engage in an authentic scientific process
  12. 12. Trait Excellent Good Needs Work PR Actions Claim (What is happening, is this a good or bad idea, etc…) Clearly & accurately identifies the type of mass wasting and the local geology. Identifies the mass wasting type, may or may not include geology, may have some errors. Mass wasting type is wrong and/or missing. No geology and/or wrong. Underline the main claim(s) in the paper and label it in the column next to the appropriate text. Presenting the argument (factors, triggers, data, etc..) Clearly and accurately identifies the factors and the human impact Identifies some factors and/or human impact potential, but not both, or may be missing a critical factor. No factors identified (or only miscellaneous factors). No mention of human impact. Underline the evidence & label it in the column next to the appropriate text. Recommendations (to build or not to build, mitigation options, etc…) Makes quality & realistic recommendations based on the identified factors Makes some recommendations, may not be practical or helpful. No recommendations made. Underline the recommendation(s) & label it in the column next to the appropriate text. Syntax & Grammar Smooth transitions between & within paragraphs, no grammatical errors Most transitions are smooth, but others are a bit cumbersome or are abrupt, a few grammatical errors Transitions are cumbersome or abrupt, many grammatical errors. Please identify these errors on the article Audience (this is supposed to be a letter to a non- geologist) Audience is clearly considered and appropriately applied Audience is somewhat considered, but sometimes inconsistently Audience is not considered at all. Images Images are appropriate & well placed within the text (or the reader is guided to the image). Images are used, but not clear or easy to follow relative to the text. No images used to supplement arguments. Peer Review of a variety of the final rubric Generalized categories Actions to engage with paper
  13. 13. A B C D F Claim Clearly & accurately identifies the type(s) of mass wasting and the geology. Accurately identifies the type(s) of mass wasting and geology. Accurately states the type(s) of mass wasting and some of the geology. States the mass wasting type and describes some geology (may have some inaccuracies). Inaccurate mass wasting type and geology and/or not present. Presenting the argument Clearly & accurately describes multiple factors that contribute to the cause of mass wasting and identifies the role of human impact. At least two different factors accurately identified that contribute to mass wasting and includes the role of human impact. At least one important factor identified (or several less critical factors) that contributes to mass wasting and includes some aspect of the role of human impact. Miscellaneous factors identified and or some inaccuracies within the factor(s) described may or may not include the role of human impact. No factors identified or completely inaccurate and no mention of the role of human impact. Recommendations Describes multiple (realistic) options for mitigation based on identified factors and human activity. Describes at least two options for mitigation based on factors and/or human activity. Makes at least one mitigation recommendation, but may not be realistic and/or based on identified factors. Makes a recommendation for mitigation, but not based on the factors. No recommendations made. Syntax & Grammar One section flows smoothly to the next in a logical progression. No grammatical or spelling errors. Well presented with no/minor grammatical or spelling errors. Logical progression of ideas presented. A few spelling and/or grammatical errors. Mostly logical progression of ideas. Many spelling and/or grammatical errors, or very difficult to follow. Difficult to determine what writer is saying due to grammar, spelling &/or flow. Audience Audience is clearly considered and appropriately applied Audience is generally considered. Audience is somewhat considered, but sometimes inconsistently Audience is inconsistent or inappropriate Audience is not considered at all. Images Images are appropriate & well placed within the text (or guides the reader to the figure). Images are appropriate, helpful and readable Images are used, but not clear or easy to follow relative to the text. Inappropriate images are used No images used to supplement arguments. Peer Review All appropriate edits are addressed and appropriately changed. Most edits are addressed and appropriately changed Some appropriate changes, others ignored (that shouldn’t have been). Only superficial comments addressed. Did not consider peer review comments (or didn’t include comments). Non-point values allows for more flexibility in weighting categories
  14. 14. Simple Rubrics • Rubrics can be for very quick and basic assignments • Example: Reading Reflection (reading assignment outside of class) – Easy to grade – Provides feedback for students on how/where to improve.
  15. 15. Simple Rubrics • Rubrics can be for very quick and basic assignments
  16. 16. Reading Reflection Rubric
  17. 17. Geology Mapping Rubric
  18. 18. Tips and considerations • Rubrics can always be better with revision • There will always be exceptions within a rubric • Allow students options for revision will make them improve their writing and will then read your feedback • Rubrics can also be used for oral presentations, short answer responses, concept maps, etc…
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