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seArts  2011 annual meeting  2 28-11 seArts 2011 annual meeting 2 28-11 Presentation Transcript

  • seARTS Annual Meeting 28 February 2011 Susan Silberberg-Robinson Planning ConsultantLecturer in Urban Design and Planning, MIT
  • Tonight’s Agenda  Gloucester Today: The Waterfront, Fishing/Maritime, and the 21st Century  The Arts and Culture of Cape Ann  Cultural “district” thoughts  A few lessons from the ISA, Waterfront Planning in Boston, and Cultural Planning  Closing Thoughts Source: http//:schooner-adventure.org28 February 2011 Arts and Culture of Gloucester: Redefining the Concept of “District” ©Susan Silberberg-Robinson
  • Framing the Issues  Gloucester has been defined by the harbor, the waterfront, the fishing and maritime industries  Pride in maritime history  Concern and fear for the place of maritime traditions and livelihoods in the present and future  Exploration and optimism of the defining elements of Gloucester in 2011 and beyond: what is the place of the harbor, the waterfront and maritime traditions in the life of the city and it’s Source: http//:schooner-adventure.org residents?  Collision of these elements – no one wants to foreclose on future opportunities by making bad decisions TODAY.28 February 2011 Arts and Culture of Gloucester: Redefining the Concept of “District” ©Susan Silberberg-Robinson
  • The HarborWalk Existing HarborWalk at St. Peter’s Square. Source: City of Gloucester at http://goucester-ma.gov, Gloucester HarborWalk document Source: City of Gloucester at http://goucester-ma.gov28 February 2011 Arts and Culture of Gloucester: Redefining the Concept of “District” ©Susan Silberberg-Robinson
  • I4-C2 Parcel Views of harbor from I4-C2. Source: City of Gloucester at http://goucester-ma.gov, Gloucester HarborWalk document Part of parcel I4-C2. Source: City of Gloucester at http://goucester-ma.gov, Gloucester HarborWalk document28 February 2011 Arts and Culture of Gloucester: Redefining the Concept of “District” ©Susan Silberberg-Robinson
  • Birdseye Site Source: www.glosta.com28 February 2011 Arts and Culture of Gloucester: Redefining the Concept of “District” ©Susan Silberberg-Robinson
  • Maritime Infrastructure Every city on the water has obsolete industrial and/or maritime waterfront…there is a glut Once redeveloped, it is unlikely this waterfront will ever return to previous maritime/industrial use – a fact that stymies action Common for communities to experience real stress around redevelopment Source: www.glosta.com decisions28 February 2011 Arts and Culture of Gloucester: Redefining the Concept of “District” ©Susan Silberberg-Robinson
  • Maritime Infrastructure Source: City of Gloucester at http://goucester-ma.gov, City of Gloucester Harbor Plan and Designated Port Area Master Plan Approved December 11, 2009.28 February 2011 Arts and Culture of Gloucester: Redefining the Concept of “District” ©Susan Silberberg-Robinson
  • Harbor Plan A second unintended impact has been the exclusion of significant public access from the waterfront. In the introduction to the 1994 DPA regulations, the state agencies emphasize that: “judicious planning of the use mix in the DPA and its environs together with compatible incorporation of public access facilities into the design of individual projects can advance the quality-of-life objectives of the Source: City of Gloucester at http://goucester-ma.gov, Gloucester surrounding community without significant interference HarborWalk document with maritime activities at or near the waterfront.” The DPA regulations are not currently encouraging this development approach. Source: City of Gloucester at http://goucester-ma.gov, City of Gloucester Harbor Plan and Existing dock at I4-C2. Source: City of Designated Port Area Master Plan Approved December 11, 2009. page 6 Gloucester at http://goucester-ma.gov, Gloucester HarborWalk document28 February 2011 Arts and Culture of Gloucester: Redefining the Concept of “District” ©Susan Silberberg-Robinson
  • Reconciling Collisions  Maritime traditions  Maritime pride  Past may not equal future  Concern and fear for preserving traditions  Where are the jobs?  Collision of these  What will be our way of life? elements – no one wants  Exploration and Source: http//:schooner-adventure.org to foreclose on future optimism of new traditions opportunities by making bad decisions TODAY.28 February 2011 Arts and Culture of Gloucester: Redefining the Concept of “District” ©Susan Silberberg-Robinson
  • Assets  seARTS  The Rocky Neck Art Colony  Goetemann Residency  Distinguished Artist/Teacher (D A/T)  Cape Ann Museum (CAM)  Nights on the Neck  Rocky Neck Historic Art Trail  The Gloucester Stage  The Writers Room  Beauport Sleeper McCann House  Rocky Neck Art Colony,  North Shore Art Association  The Ocean Alliance  Mayors Committee for the Arts  Art Haven school arts program  Museums/Learning Centers/Art Cinema (downtown Gloucester)  Cape Ann Museum Source: seARTS  Gloucester Maritime Heritage Center  Sargent House Museum  Cape Ann Community Cinema28 February 2011 Arts and Culture of Gloucester: Redefining the Concept of “District” ©Susan Silberberg-Robinson
  • Arts and Culture Arts Culture the conscious use of skill and The integrated pattern of human creative imagination especially in knowledge, belief, and behavior that the production of aesthetic depends upon the capacity for learning objects; and transmitting knowledge to succeeding generations also : works so produced the customary beliefs, social forms, and material traits of a racial, religious, or social group; also : the characteristic features of everyday existence…shared by people in a place or time Source: www.mirriam-webster.com28 February 2011 Arts and Culture of Gloucester: Redefining the Concept of “District” ©Susan Silberberg-Robinson
  • Arts and Culture Arts is in a place and Culture comes from a place, time from a time, from a community. It can include Art Art can be superimposed on a Culture and cultural practices are of a place and a people. Art can exist community (geographically, ethnically, in a community without being of etc.) Culture comes from livelihoods, daily the community. practices, values and beliefs. Culture is not top down but rather is internally Art can be institutionally driven, driven. Culture is the very core of a externally drive, or internally community and represents past, present community driven. It can be “top and future. down.”28 February 2011 Arts and Culture of Gloucester: Redefining the Concept of “District” ©Susan Silberberg-Robinson
  • Cultural Vitality  Cultural vitality is evidence of creating, disseminating, validating, and supporting arts and culture as a dimension of everyday community life. - Maria Rosario Jackson, The Urban Institute Arts and Culture Indicators in Community Building Project28 February 2011 Arts and Culture of Gloucester: Redefining the Concept of “District” ©Susan Silberberg-Robinson
  • Cultural Vitality Cultural vitality encompasses a much more expansive view of “artistic practice” within the community:  cultural and societal practices, industries, memory, history and tradition.  crosses all boundaries of age, education and occupation An arts and cultural district is a geographic district. But it is also an ephemeral district and sphere of practice encompassing: • Public policy • an educational zone • an economic development strategy • a zoning plan • and more….28 February 2011 Arts and Culture of Gloucester: Redefining the Concept of “District” ©Susan Silberberg-Robinson
  • An Inclusive Model The question is bigger  What role will arts and culture (of our community) play in our future? • What is our public policy? • What is our educational philosophy? • What is our economic development strategy? Copyright ©2010 Dheera Venkatraman • How does our zoning not only re-act but pro-act?  Who represents our culture at the table?28 February 2011 Arts and Culture of Gloucester: Redefining the Concept of “District” ©Susan Silberberg-Robinson
  • A Rephrasing of the Question…  It is about Arts and Culture  The question must be answered through cross-sector collaborations among city officials and agencies, industries, artists, developers, artist-focused organizations, community development corporations, and others.  Some answers can be found through other initiatives and the lessons learned:  MetLife Foundation Innovative Space Awards (ISA) and arts and culture projects and research  Arts and Cultural District Planning  Boston Waterfront Planning  Cultural, education and non-profit facility planning for the waterfront (FPA study)28 February 2011 Arts and Culture of Gloucester: Redefining the Concept of “District” ©Susan Silberberg-Robinson
  • Lessons from other Researchers  Nonprofit and public explicitly arts-related organizations  Retail arts venues—bookstores, music stores, film theaters, craft and art supply stores  Non-arts venues with arts and cultural programming— parks; libraries; ethnic associations, societies, and centers  Festivals and parades  Arts-focused media outlets (print and electronic, including web-based venues)  Art schools  Presence of working artists and tradition bearers  Maria Rosario Jackson, The Urban Institute Cultural Vitality Indicators Project28 February 2011 Arts and Culture of Gloucester: Redefining the Concept of “District” ©Susan Silberberg-Robinson
  • Cultural Vitality  Amateur art making  Collective/community art making  K–12 arts education  Arts after-school programs  Audience participation  Purchase of artistic goods (materials for making art as well as final arts products)  Discourse about arts and culture in the media  Maria Rosario Jackson, The Urban Institute Cultural Vitality Indicators Project28 February 2011 Arts and Culture of Gloucester: Redefining the Concept of “District” ©Susan Silberberg-Robinson
  • Cultural Vitality • Public expenditures in support of the arts in all sectors (nonprofit, public, and commercial) • Foundation/philanthropic expenditures in support of the arts (nonprofit, public, and commercial) • Volunteering and personal giving to the arts • Integration of arts and culture into other policy areas and corresponding allocation of resources (e.g., community development, education, parks and recreation, etc.) • Broader interpretation of arts and culture and related impacts (beyond economic and education impacts) • Use of arts and culture related data • Revised interpretation of stakeholders in arts and culture • Broader Interpretation of strategic cultural investments (by arts and other sectors) • Design of neighborhoods and essential amenities • Design of cultural districts and cultural facilities - Maria Rosario Jackson, The Urban Institute Cultural Vitality Indicators Project28 February 2011 Arts and Culture of Gloucester: Redefining the Concept of “District” ©Susan Silberberg-Robinson
  • Lessons from Research and ISA  Creates an identity for an area…useful for economic development and good image  Proven retention device for residents and businesses  Artist space attracts creative entrepreneurs, enhancing regional economic competitiveness  Provides a creative and unique arts and culture “cachet” which helps business recruiting Source: How Artist Space Matters by Metris Arts Consulting 201028 February 2011 Arts and Culture of Gloucester: Redefining the Concept of “District” ©Susan Silberberg-Robinson
  • Lessons from Research and ISA  Increase surrounding property values and return properties to the tax rolls  Area businesses experience increased demand for services  New visitors to the area engage in ancillary spending Source: How Artist Space Matters by Metris Arts Consulting 201028 February 2011 Arts and Culture of Gloucester: Redefining the Concept of “District” ©Susan Silberberg-Robinson
  • Lessons from Research and ISA  Arts spaces can be good fit for older Create a unique buildings place that has no competitive equal  Enhanced public safety (real and (can’t be replicated in perceived) the suburbs, in “Lifestyle” centers, or  Creation of new spaces open to the public other developments)  Community “ownership” and stewardship of space  Educational opportunities  Enhanced cultural awareness and pride  Positive attitude of residents and visitors28 February 2011 Arts and Culture of Gloucester: Redefining the Concept of “District” ©Susan Silberberg-Robinson
  • Lessons from Research and ISA  Artists and arts orgs need help with building development and ongoing facility management  Small arts orgs and artists’ cooperatives can struggle with maximizing:  Size, relationship and organization of spaces  Creative possibilities and alternative uses of spaces  Marketability of space for enhanced revenue streams  Building management takes away from art time…helpful to have a partner  Little knowledge of “value added” to a development  Need assistance in engaging with community28 February 2011 Arts and Culture of Gloucester: Redefining the Concept of “District” ©Susan Silberberg-Robinson
  • Lessons from Research and ISA  Municipalities have a role to play in most types of spaces  Public agencies are often involved to “prime” the projects:  Property owners  Bringing partners together  Credibility and economies of scale  Overall vision  Providing “site ready” projects (environmental cleanup, permitting, liens and ownership issues resolved)28 February 2011 Arts and Culture of Gloucester: Redefining the Concept of “District” ©Susan Silberberg-Robinson
  • Lessons from Research and ISA  Developers and non-arts org need help in  Artists understanding artists’ needs  Developers  Developer expertise/ownership combined  Local municipalities with arts non-profit management and  Public agencies organization is a powerful  Funders combination/team  Investors  Artist-focused  Cultural organizations and civic groups organizations are key players in ensuring success  CDCs  Individual  Arts and culture entrepreneurs/leaders Entrepreneurs often go where others fear to tread…true pioneers and risk takers28 February 2011 Arts and Culture of Gloucester: Redefining the Concept of “District” ©Susan Silberberg-Robinson
  • Lessons from Research and ISA  Collaborations can be complex  Funding sources often come from a mind boggling array of sources with complex requirements  Difficult to convince funders, community, policy makers that projects are feasible and credible  Can be a challenge to get proper advice on development process  Constant search for balance of affordable space with high tech/sophisticated arts requirements28 February 2011 Arts and Culture of Gloucester: Redefining the Concept of “District” ©Susan Silberberg-Robinson
  • Lessons from Research and ISA  Strong leadership, equitable development process -artists and community  Artists integrated into leadership and/or decision-making  Deep knowledge of community - responsive/born out of existing community social/cultural history  Attempts to balance expertise in artist services/needs, affordable housing, community development practices  Excellent programming for geographic/cultural community  Savvy about building spaces, development, value added  Organizational and fiscal capacity Open Book 2.0, Minneapolis, MN, ISA Honorable Mention 200928 February 2011 Arts and Culture of Gloucester: Redefining the Concept of “District” ©Susan Silberberg-Robinson
  • Lessons Learned  Charlestown Navy Yard Waterfront Activation Plan and Facilities of Public Accommodation Study  Waterfront land is difficult to redevelop:  Developers need special skills and must be multi-talented  State regulations and development frameworks can be complicated and may not match current economic cycles nor match demand for space  Waterfront space is premium cost – not well-suited to smaller non- profits and educational and cultural uses without heavy subsidy or iconic uses/structures (ICA, NE Aquarium in Boston)  Use arts, culture, history and education in waterfront development to link to broader efforts in community  Cities must be proactive, visionary and champions of development (must be in the driver’s seat and offer support for development)28 February 2011 Arts and Culture of Gloucester: Redefining the Concept of “District” ©Susan Silberberg-Robinson
  • Lessons Learned  Complex enough to require an advisory support committee28 February 2011 Arts and Culture of Gloucester: Redefining the Concept of “District” ©Susan Silberberg-Robinson
  • Lessons Learned28 February 2011 Arts and Culture of Gloucester: Redefining the Concept of “District” ©Susan Silberberg-Robinson
  • The Pieces Environment Waterfront Public Access Fishing and Maritime Tourism History Civic Pride Arts and Culture Economic Development Education Sustainability28 February 2011 Arts and Culture of Gloucester: Redefining the Concept of “District” ©Susan Silberberg-Robinson
  •  Be true to the culture of Gloucester and vision it for the 21st Century  Risk taking is necessary…but within an accepted framework  Innovation is the key to survival and sustainability  Be proactive, not reactive  Adopt an inclusive and broad definition of arts and culture and back it up with public initiative, vision and collaboration28 February 2011 Arts and Culture of Gloucester: Redefining the Concept of “District” ©Susan Silberberg-Robinson
  •  Create certainty in the development environment  City wide waterfront planning and programming. Don’t look on a site by site basis (less concern then with piecemeal chipping away at maritime base) – purpose of harbor plan but more than this.  Heavy recruitment of uses and industries and even arts and cultural uses from outside Gloucester  Incremental is good but that doesn’t mean timid  Strong leadership is essential – planning by consensus alone will lead to a “lowest common denominator solution”28 February 2011 Arts and Culture of Gloucester: Redefining the Concept of “District” ©Susan Silberberg-Robinson
  • Susan Silberberg-RobinsonSusan is Lecturer in Urban Design and Planning in the Department of UrbanStudies and Planning at MIT. As an urban designer, planner and architect, sheconsults to municipalities, community-based clients, foundations, and culturalorganizations on projects related to design and community development with afocus on arts and culture.She has worked on the public waterfront plan for the Charlestown Navy Yard,the master plan for the Worcester, MA Arts District, and the Vision 20/20 forConcord, NH, a comprehensive plan for the state’s capital. She is currentlycompleting an artist housing feasibility study for the City of Jacksonville, FL.As Associate Director of the MetLife Foundation Innovative Space Awards,Susan is leading the research effort to identify innovative affordable artist spaceprojects and the ways in which artists engage with communities to effectpositive change and contribute to neighborhood livability and vitality.Susan is on the Board of Directors of Historic Boston, Inc. and the Joshua BatesArt Center in the South End of Boston. 617-253-2027 scsilber@mit.edu