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Top 10 innovations that failed
Top 10 innovations that failed
Top 10 innovations that failed
Top 10 innovations that failed
Top 10 innovations that failed
Top 10 innovations that failed
Top 10 innovations that failed
Top 10 innovations that failed
Top 10 innovations that failed
Top 10 innovations that failed
Top 10 innovations that failed
Top 10 innovations that failed
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Top 10 innovations that failed

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  • 1. TOP  10  ‘INNOVATIONS’  THAT  SHOULD   HAVE  CHANGED  THE  WORLD...     BUT  DIDN’T  MANAGE  IT.   This  list,  compiled  by  a  panel  of  20  experts  from  the  BriNsh  Science  AssociaNon,  reveals  the  most  exci+ng  innova+ons  that  failed  to  live  up  to   expecta+ons.    
  • 2. 1.  Concorde  It  was  an  engineering  marvel  admired  by  NASA  and  the  envy  of  airlines  around  the  world.  ASer  its  maiden  flight  in  1969,  Concorde  was  heralded  as  the  dawn  of  a  new  age  of  supersonic  passenger  air  travel.  UlNmately,  however,  just  20  of  these  aircraS  were  ever  built  and  the  high  running  costs  saw  a  trip  on  Concorde  become  a  luxury  flight  rather  than  rouNne  transport.  A  combinaNon  of  the  Air  France  crash  in  2000  and  the  slump  in  air  travel  following  the  September  11  terrorist  aYacks  saw  Concorde  finally  reNred  from  service  from  the  two  airlines  that  operated  them  –  BriNsh  Airways  and  Air  France.  Today,  airline  passengers  can  barely  travel  at  half  the  speed  reached  by  Concorde.  
  • 3. 2.  Microwave  ovens  The  microwave  oven  was  supposed  to  sound  the  death  knell  of  the  tradiNonal  oven.  UNlising  microwave  radiaNon  to  heat  water  inside  food,  it  was  able  to  cook  from  the  inside  out.  The  inability  to  put  metal  objects  inside  microwave  ovens,  their  tendency  to  heat  crockery  more  than  the  food  and  their  associaNon  with  unhealthy  ready  meals  meant  they  only  ever  became  an  addiNon  to  the  oven  rather  than  a  replacement.    
  • 4. 3.  The  Millennium  Bug  Known  as  the  Year  2000  problem,  the  Millennium  bug  was  reported  as  a  computer  soSware  glitch  that  threatened  to  send  financial  markets  crashing,  cause  aircraS  to  drop  out  of  the  sky,  cause  power  cuts  and  cause  widespread  computer  chaos.  The  problem  stemmed  from  a  problem  with  many  computer  programs  that  only  stored  years  with  two  digits,  which  would  have  resulted  in  their  clocks  being  reset  when  the  millennium  rolled  over.  The  new  millennium  arrived  with  liYle  trouble  and  countries  that  had  spent  very  liYle  on  tackling  the  Y2K  bug,  such  as  Italy  and  South  Korea,  performed  just  as  well  as  those  who  had  spent  a  fortune.    
  • 5. 4.  High  Rise  Buildings  Tower  blocks  began  springing  up  in  ciNes  in  Europe  to  replace  the  buildings  destroyed  by  the  aerial  bombardment  during  the  blitz.  They  provided  cheap  and  easily  assembled  housing  that  allowed  large  numbers  of  people  from  the  crumbling  tenement  blocks  to  be  given  homes.  They  were  seen  as  a  bold  social  experiment  and  were  welcomed  for  their  innovaNve  design  and  spectacular  views.  Soon  we  would  all  be  living  in  a  high  rise  utopia.  Dwindling  council  budgets  for  maintenance  and  poor  building  materials,  however,  saw  these  dreams  turn  sour  and  they  have  now  become  a  symbol  of  1970s  ugliness  and  poverty.  High  rise  buildings  now  rank  among  the  least  desirable  places  to  live.  
  • 6. 5.  Moon  landings  The  excitement  that  followed  the  Apollo  mission  to  the  Moon  and  Neil  Armstrongs  famous  words  as  he  became  the  first  human  to  set  foot  on  the  surface  of  a  solar  body  other  than  our  own,  was  huge.  The  pictures  beamed  back  by  the  crew  revealed  a  barren  and  inhospitable  landscape  with  an  undeniably  fantasNc  view.  Apollo  11  and  the  subsequent  five  lunar  landings  certainly  helped  to  inspire  a  generaNon  of  scienNsts.  Sadly  only  one  scienNst,  Harrison  SchmiY,  a  geologist,  ever  got  to  walk  on  the  Moons  surface  and  aSer  Apollo  17  in  1972,  Nasa  abandoned  manned  missions  to  our  nearest  astronomical  neighbour.  
  • 7. 6.  DomosNc  Robots  In  the  1950s,  predicNons  of  what  life  would  be  like  by  the  end  of  the  millennium  placed  robots  firmly  into  the  domesNc  sefng.  Intelligent,  autonomous  machines  would  move  out  of  the  science  ficNon  movies  and  into  our  homes.  They  would  help  housewives  with  domesNc  chores  from  vacuuming  to  washing  up.  Today,  robots  are  now  only  just  finding  use  in  military  sefngs  in  the  guise  of  unmanned  aircraS  and  bomb  disposal  drones,  but  sNll  have  to  be  remotely  controlled  by  humans.  Small  numbers  of  roboNc  vacuum  cleaners  that  trundle  around  the  home  sweeping  up  crumbs  have  been  sold,  but  sadly  most  home  owners  sNll  have  to  get  their  hands  dirty  without  the  aid  mechanical  helper.  
  • 8. 7.  Video  Phones  Featured  on  Tomorrows  World  in  the  late  1980s,  video  conferencing  was  billed  as  the  way  we  could  be  communicaNng  in  the  future.  Not  only  would  we  be  able  to  talk  to  friends  and  relaNves  on  the  other  side  of  the  world,  but  we  would  be  able  to  see  them  too.  Despite  enjoying  a  slight  revival  in  the  business  world  as  concerns  about  climate  change  saw  many  push  video  conferencing  as  an  alternaNve  to  air  travel  for  meeNngs,  they  have  really  failed  to  take  off  in  any  meaningful  way.  Instead,  the  video  funcNon  on  mobile  phones  now  tends  to  be  used  to  capture  the  wacky  drunken  anNcs  of  friends  while  enjoying  a  night  out  on  the  Nles.  
  • 9. 8.  The  Mini  A  revoluNonary  vehicle  made  by  the  BriNsh  Motor  CorporaNon  and  is  successors,  which  made  small  cars  "cool"  and  classless.  It  became  an  icon  of  the  1960s  and  helped  inspire  new  ways  of  packaging  engines  and  passengers.  Despite  the  trend  it  set  for  so  called  "superminis",  for  the  next  forty  years  cars  got  bigger  and  heavier.  Even  the  revamped  version  of  the  Mini  produced  by  BMW  saw  the  iconic  liYle  car  grow  in  size.  It  is  now  22  inches  long,  12  inches  wider  and  nearly  twice  as  heavy.  
  • 10. 9.  MagneNc  trains  Another  Tomorrows  World  favourite,  Maglev  trains  were  to  be  the  ultra  modern,  super  fast  form  of  transport.  Rather  than  using  wheels  and  tracks  the  trains  levitated  above  powerful  magnets  along  the  track.  MagneNc  trains  really  only  entered  use  in  Japan  and  parts  of  China.  Despite  having  the  potenNal  to  reach  speeds  far  in  excess  of  aircraS,  the  highest  speed  achieved  so  far  was  361mph.  just  3  miles  per  hour  faster  than  the  speed  record  set  by  convenNonal  trains.  
  • 11. 10.  Nuclear  power  Seen  as  the  answer  to  the  worlds  energy  problems  in  the  1950s,  there  were  predicNons  almost  everything  from  cars  to  kitchen  appliances  would  become  nuclear  powered.  Fears  over  safety  and  difficulNes  in  disposing  of  the  radioacNve  waste  got  in  the  way....  
  • 12. Share  your  innovaNon  mistakes  and  learn  from   the  mistakes  of  others!     www.redzezel.com/innova+onfailures  

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