Introduc)on	
  to	
  New	
  Media	
  
NM1000	
  	
  |	
  	
  Townsville	
  

1909	
  -­‐	
  2009	
  
A	
  Techno-­‐Futuris...
“

To	
   admire	
   an	
   old	
   picture	
   is	
   to	
   pour	
   our	
   sensibility	
   into	
   a	
   funeral	
   ...
1909	
  -­‐	
  2009	
  

The	
  Techno-­‐Futurist	
  Century	
  

Just	
  Imagine	
  |	
  	
  Twen?eth	
  Century	
  Fox	
...
Futurism	
  

The	
  Manifesto	
  of	
  Speed	
  &	
  Technology	
  
“My	
  Italian	
  blood	
  raced	
  faster	
  when	
  my	
  	
  
lips	
  coined	
  out	
  loud	
  the	
  word	
  futurism....
The	
  Future	
  

The	
  Manifesto	
  of	
  Speed	
  &	
  Technology	
  

Futurism	
  	
  |	
  	
  Tate	
  Modern	
  	
  ...
The	
  Future	
  

The	
  Manifesto	
  of	
  Speed	
  &	
  Technology	
  

• 

It	
   was	
   indeed	
   a	
   wild	
   an...
The	
  Future	
  

The	
  Manifesto	
  of	
  Speed	
  &	
  Technology	
  

“

	
  
We	
  will	
  sing	
  of	
  the	
  grea...
The	
  Future	
  

The	
  Manifesto	
  of	
  Speed	
  &	
  Technology	
  

• 

Futurism	
   represented	
   a	
   cultural...
Russolo	
  	
  |	
  	
  Carra	
  	
  |	
  	
  Marine4	
  	
  |	
  	
  Boccioni	
  	
  |	
  	
  Severini	
  	
  |	
  	
  Pa...
Shape	
  &	
  Percep)on	
  

Cubism	
  &	
  the	
  Human	
  Form	
  
Gino	
  Severini	
  
Yellow	
  Dancers	
  (1912)	
  
Francis	
  Picabia	
  
Dancers	
  &	
  the	
  Spring	
  I	
  (1912)	
  
Fernand	
  Lerger	
  
Nudes	
  In	
  the	
  Forest	
  (1909)	
  
The	
  Street	
  

Woman,	
  Convergence	
  &	
  Light	
  
Umberto	
  Boccioni	
  
The	
  Street	
  Enters	
  the	
  House	
  (1911)	
  
Umberto	
  Boccioni	
  
Simultaneous	
  Visions	
  (1911)	
  
Umberto	
  Boccioni	
  
The	
  Laugh	
  (1911)	
  
Umberto	
  Boccioni	
  
Modern	
  Idol	
  	
  (1910-­‐1911)	
  
Electricity	
  

Light	
  and	
  the	
  Carnival	
  of	
  Technology	
  
Carlo	
  Cara	
  
Nocturne	
  in	
  Piazza	
  Becarria	
  (1911)	
  
Umberto	
  Boccioni	
  
The	
  Forces	
  of	
  the	
  Street	
  (1911)	
  
Giacomo	
  Balla	
  
Luna	
  Park	
  In	
  Paris	
  (1900)	
  
Carlo	
  Carra	
  
Leaving	
  the	
  Theatre	
  (1910)	
  
Joseph	
  Stella	
  
BaZle	
  of	
  Lights,	
  Coney	
  Island	
  Mardi	
  Gras	
  (1913-­‐1914)	
  
Colour	
  

The	
  Future	
  is	
  Now	
  
Robert	
  Delaunay	
  
Circular	
  Forms,	
  Sun	
  No.	
  2	
  (1912-­‐1913)	
  
Morgan	
  Russell	
  
Cosmic	
  Synchromy	
  (1914)	
  
Umberto	
  Boccioni	
  
Dynamism	
  of	
  a	
  Human	
  Body	
  (1913)	
  
Futurism	
  

Designing	
  the	
  Built	
  Environment	
  
Futurism	
  

Designing	
  the	
  Built	
  Environment	
  
Une	
  Cite	
  Industrielle	
  
France	
  (1904)	
  
	
  

Tony...
Futurism	
  

Designing	
  the	
  Built	
  Environment	
  
La	
  Ville	
  Radieuse,	
  France	
  
(1930)	
  
	
  

Le	
  C...
Futurism	
  

Designing	
  the	
  Built	
  Environment	
  
Metropolis,	
  	
  
Germany	
  (1926)	
  
	
  

Fritz	
  Lang’s...
Futurism	
  

Designing	
  the	
  Built	
  Environment	
  
Perisphere	
  &	
  Trylon	
  
Structures,	
  	
  
USA	
  (1939)...
Futurism	
  

Designing	
  the	
  Built	
  Environment	
  

City	
  of	
  the	
  Future,	
  	
  
USA	
  (1946)	
  
	
  

F...
Futurism	
  

Designing	
  the	
  Built	
  Environment	
  
Wichita	
  House,	
  	
  
USA	
  (1946)	
  
	
  

Buckminster	
...
Futurism	
  

Designing	
  the	
  Built	
  Environment	
  
Plug-­‐In	
  City,	
  	
  
UK	
  (1964)	
  
	
  

Archigram	
  ...
Futurism	
  

Designing	
  the	
  Built	
  Environment	
  

Bladerunner,	
  	
  
UK/USA	
  (1982)	
  
Ridley	
  ScoU’s	
  ...
Futurism	
  

Designing	
  the	
  Built	
  Environment	
  
Final	
  Fantasy,	
  	
  
Europe	
  (1997)	
  
	
  

The	
  aim...
Futurism	
  

Designing	
  the	
  Built	
  Environment	
  

Bioshock,	
  US/Australia	
  (2006)	
  	
  The	
  city	
  of	
...
Microsod,	
  US	
  (2009)	
  	
  The	
  urban	
  environment	
  and	
  the	
  society	
  of	
  the	
  future.	
  	
  Data	...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

The Techno-Futurist Century (Part A)

404 views

Published on

Produced for the Bachelor of New Media Arts core subject: NM1000 Introduction to New Media. The course provides an overview of communication technologies and art pro

Published in: Education
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
404
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
7
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

The Techno-Futurist Century (Part A)

  1. 1. Introduc)on  to  New  Media   NM1000    |    Townsville   1909  -­‐  2009   A  Techno-­‐Futurist  Century  
  2. 2. “ To   admire   an   old   picture   is   to   pour   our   sensibility   into   a   funeral   urn   instead   of   cas?ng   it   forward  with  violent  spurts  of  crea?on  and  ac?on.  Do  you  want  to  waste  the  best  part   of   your   strength   in   a   useless   admira?on   of   the   past,   from   which   you   will   emerge   exhausted,  diminished,  trampled  on?       Indeed   daily   visits   to   museums,   libraries   and   academies   (those   cemeteries   of   wasted   effort,   calvaries   of   crucified   dreams,   registers   of   false   starts!)   is   for   ar?sts   what   prolonged   supervision   by   the   parents   is   for   intelligent   young   men,   drunk   with   their   own   talent  and  ambi?on.       For  the  dying,  for  invalids  and  for  prisoners  it  may  be  all  right.  It  is,  perhaps,  some  sort  of   balm   for   their   wounds,   the   admirable   past,   at   a   moment   when   the   future   is   denied   them.    But  we  will  have  none  of  it,  we,  the  young,  strong  and  living  Futurists!”   Filippo  Marine4    |    The  Manifesto  of  Futurism  |    1909  
  3. 3. 1909  -­‐  2009   The  Techno-­‐Futurist  Century   Just  Imagine  |    Twen?eth  Century  Fox    |    David  Butler    |      1930  
  4. 4. Futurism   The  Manifesto  of  Speed  &  Technology  
  5. 5. “My  Italian  blood  raced  faster  when  my     lips  coined  out  loud  the  word  futurism.       It  was  the  new  formula  of  Ac?on-­‐Art  and  a   code  of  mental  health     It  was  youthful  and  innova?ve  banner,   an?-­‐tradi?onal,  op?mis?c,  heroic  and     dynamic,  that  had  to  be  hoisted  over  the     ruins  of  all  aUachment  to  the  past.     MarineD    |    Milan    |    1915  
  6. 6. The  Future   The  Manifesto  of  Speed  &  Technology   Futurism    |    Tate  Modern      |    London    |    BBC    |    2009  
  7. 7. The  Future   The  Manifesto  of  Speed  &  Technology   •  It   was   indeed   a   wild   and   exci?ng   ?me;   as   Marine4   spoke  of  over  turning  his  expensive  automobile  in  a   ditch   in   Italy   the   modern   world   of   1909   was   shrinking.   •  Speed   and   technology   were   working   together   to   change  the  Victorian  era  into  the  mechanised  world   we  know  today.   •  The   future   looked   bright,   exci?ng,   palpable:   wide   urban  streets  flush  with  cars,  ci?es  awash  in  electric   light,  the  squawk  of  familiar  voices  down  telephone   lines,  radio,  cinema  and  sound  recording  technology,   trams,  trains  and  aeroplanes  in  the  sky.   •  This   had   all   happened   in   a   maUer   of   20   years   –   anything  was  possible.   Edward  Wadsworth    |       Dazzle-­‐ships  in  Dry  Dock  at  Liverpool    |    1919  
  8. 8. The  Future   The  Manifesto  of  Speed  &  Technology   “   We  will  sing  of  the  great  crowds  agitated  by  work,  pleasure  and  revolt;  the  mul?-­‐colored   and   polyphonic   surf   of   revolu?ons   in   modern   capitals:   the   nocturnal   vibra?on   of   the   arsenals  and  the  workshops  beneath  their  violent  electric  moons:       the  gluUonous  railway  sta)ons  devouring  smoking  serpents;  factories  suspended  from   the  clouds  by  the  thread  of  their  smoke;  bridges  with  the  leap  of  gymnasts  flung  across   the   diabolic   cutlery   of   sunny   rivers:   adventurous   steamers   sniffing   the   horizon;   great-­‐ breasted   locomo)ves,   puffing   on   the   rails   like   enormous   steel   horses   with   long   tubes   for  bridle,  and  the  gliding  flight  of  aeroplanes  whose  propeller  sounds  like  the  flapping   of  a  flag  and  the  applause  of  enthusias?c  crowds.”     Filippo  Marine4    |    The  Manifesto  of  Futurism  |    1909  
  9. 9. The  Future   The  Manifesto  of  Speed  &  Technology   •  Futurism   represented   a   cultural   transforma?on   of   modern  life;  such  as  it  was  at  the  dawn  of  the  20th   century.   •  Marine4’s   words   -­‐   and   the   ac?ons   of   his   contemporary   provocateurs   who   helped   him   fashion   the   movement   and   spread   the   word   –   permeated  throughout  European  culture.   •  What  followed  were  manifestos  on  theatre,  cinema,   prose,   lust,   poli?cs,   sculpture,   noise,   even   weights   and  measures.   •  All   the   ?me,   swimming   with   movement,   speed   agility   …   and   an   unwavering   lust   for   the   poli?cs   of   anarchy   and   technology   of   speed   which   were   fast   tumbling  Europe  towards  Fascism  and  World  War.   Felix  Del  Marie    |    The  Port    |    1913  
  10. 10. Russolo    |    Carra    |    Marine4    |    Boccioni    |    Severini    |    Paris    |    1912  
  11. 11. Shape  &  Percep)on   Cubism  &  the  Human  Form  
  12. 12. Gino  Severini   Yellow  Dancers  (1912)  
  13. 13. Francis  Picabia   Dancers  &  the  Spring  I  (1912)  
  14. 14. Fernand  Lerger   Nudes  In  the  Forest  (1909)  
  15. 15. The  Street   Woman,  Convergence  &  Light  
  16. 16. Umberto  Boccioni   The  Street  Enters  the  House  (1911)  
  17. 17. Umberto  Boccioni   Simultaneous  Visions  (1911)  
  18. 18. Umberto  Boccioni   The  Laugh  (1911)  
  19. 19. Umberto  Boccioni   Modern  Idol    (1910-­‐1911)  
  20. 20. Electricity   Light  and  the  Carnival  of  Technology  
  21. 21. Carlo  Cara   Nocturne  in  Piazza  Becarria  (1911)  
  22. 22. Umberto  Boccioni   The  Forces  of  the  Street  (1911)  
  23. 23. Giacomo  Balla   Luna  Park  In  Paris  (1900)  
  24. 24. Carlo  Carra   Leaving  the  Theatre  (1910)  
  25. 25. Joseph  Stella   BaZle  of  Lights,  Coney  Island  Mardi  Gras  (1913-­‐1914)  
  26. 26. Colour   The  Future  is  Now  
  27. 27. Robert  Delaunay   Circular  Forms,  Sun  No.  2  (1912-­‐1913)  
  28. 28. Morgan  Russell   Cosmic  Synchromy  (1914)  
  29. 29. Umberto  Boccioni   Dynamism  of  a  Human  Body  (1913)  
  30. 30. Futurism   Designing  the  Built  Environment  
  31. 31. Futurism   Designing  the  Built  Environment   Une  Cite  Industrielle   France  (1904)     Tony  Granier  was  the  first   architect  to  establish  the  idea   that  architects  should  plan   ci?es  as  a  whole  rather  than   concentrate  on  single  dwellings   and  grand  isolated  structures.     He    divided  his  imaginary  city   into  categories:  industrial,   residen?al,  transport,  sport   and  health.  
  32. 32. Futurism   Designing  the  Built  Environment   La  Ville  Radieuse,  France   (1930)     Le  Corbusier’s  design  for  a   ‘modern’  city  was  configured  to   give  maximum  benefit  to  its   inhabitants.       The  pedestrian  streets  were   placed  above  the  traffic;  zones   were  created  like  ribbons   which  extended  out  from  the   city;  and  large  green  zones   existed  beneath  and  around   buildings.     His  ideas  were  however  seen   as  segrega?ng  society  and   inhumane.  
  33. 33. Futurism   Designing  the  Built  Environment   Metropolis,     Germany  (1926)     Fritz  Lang’s  cinema?c   masterpiece  envisioned  a  city   of  suspended  walkways,  flying   cars  and  towering  skyscrapers.     The  spiritual  life  of  the  ci?zens   were  forever  under  the  threat   of  technology.       Society  is  split  into  the  above   ground  individuals  who  are   free  to  pursue  intellectual  and   physical  well  being,  while  the   subterranean  crowd  who  enjoy   no  individuality  or  personal   fulfilment.  
  34. 34. Futurism   Designing  the  Built  Environment   Perisphere  &  Trylon   Structures,     USA  (1939)     Designed  by  Henry  Dreyfuss  for   the  1939  World’s  Fair,  the  two   structures  would  form  the   centrepiece  of  the  exhibit  -­‐   “Democracity”.     A  nod  to  America’s  new  found   posi?on  as  the  world’s  most   powerful  industrialised  na?on.     From  road  transporta?on   systems,  space  flight  and   electrical  appliances,  the   structure  was  the  symbol  and   the  sign  of  the  new  American   century.  
  35. 35. Futurism   Designing  the  Built  Environment   City  of  the  Future,     USA  (1946)     Frank  R.  Paul’s  illustra?on  of   the  ‘future  city”  is  a  well  used   archetype  for  sci-­‐fi  books  and   film.     This  style  of  futurism  has  also   been  borrowed  ?me  and  again   for  “the  visual  landscape  of   mainstream  design”.     It  was  through  these  visual   representa?ons  of  sci-­‐fi  books   that  the  wider  public   imagina?on  was  given  a   tangible  glimpse  of  what  the   future  may  look  like.  
  36. 36. Futurism   Designing  the  Built  Environment   Wichita  House,     USA  (1946)     Buckminster  Fuller  was  a   unique  voice  in  architecture   and  design,  who  never   completed  any  formal  training.     He  built  his  design,  the  Wichita   House  as  a  response  to  the   machine  aesthe?c  of  the  mid   20thC.     His  key  values  were  dynamism   and  efficiency,  and  having   moved  his  designs  from  the   drawing  board  to  reality  he   inspired  the  futurist   explora?ons  of  the  1960s.  
  37. 37. Futurism   Designing  the  Built  Environment   Plug-­‐In  City,     UK  (1964)     Archigram  was  an  architect’s   collec?ve  who  produced   stunningly  imagina?ve  designs   for  futuris?c  ci?es  and  urban   enclaves.     Their  inspira?on  was  drawn   from  pop  culture,  the  space   age,  rampant  consumerism  and   the  throw  away  culture  of   Bri?sh  society.     They  envisioned  expandable   ci?es  which  could  evolve  above   exis?ng  infrastructure  such  as   water  and  power.  
  38. 38. Futurism   Designing  the  Built  Environment   Bladerunner,     UK/USA  (1982)   Ridley  ScoU’s  sci-­‐fi  masterpiece   was  based  on  the  novel  Why   Do  Androids  Dream  of  Electric   Sheep?  By  Phillip  K.  Dick..   Again  we  see  flying  cars  and   towering  skyscrapers,  yet  we   are  also  confronted  by  the   dazzling  electrifica?on  of  21st   century  and  the  heavy   satura?on  of  adver?sing  and   urban  chaos..   Architecture  here  could  be   referred  to  “add  on   architecture”  as  skyscrapers   extend  upon  exis?ng   structures,  crea?ve  a  dark  and   oppressive  cityscape.  
  39. 39. Futurism   Designing  the  Built  Environment   Final  Fantasy,     Europe  (1997)     The  aim  of  original  game   designers  Sony  were  and  s?ll   are  the  key  ambi?ons  of  the   video  game  design  trade:   “immersive  experiences”  and   “unique  worlds”.     Here  steams,  pipes,  mechanic   zed  environments,  sulphuric   atmospheres  add  to  the   claustrophobia  and  chaos  of   classic  sci-­‐fi  TV  and  film   moments.     The  city  becomes  a  navigable   character.  
  40. 40. Futurism   Designing  the  Built  Environment   Bioshock,  US/Australia  (2006)    The  city  of  Rapture.    Set  in  the  1960s,  the  past  is  compromised  by  the  future  in  the   ar?st’s  representa?on  of  a  collapsed  society  inhabi?ng  an  underwater  city.    This  is  one  of  many  dystopian  visions  of  the   contemporary  “near  future”  designs  of  the  urban  experience.    Inspired  by  Orwell’s  1984  and  the  1976  film  Logan’s  Run.  
  41. 41. Microsod,  US  (2009)    The  urban  environment  and  the  society  of  the  future.    Data   replaces  architecture.    Informa?on  is  ambient.    Reality  is  augmented.    Microsoo’s  vision  for   2019  as  designed  in  2009.    Also  see  2012  version    and  Nokia’s  version.  

×