Poverty in American Education By Blake Bowers
America’s Poor <ul><li>In 2004, the poverty line was $19,484 per year for a family of four. </li></ul><ul><li>That year 37...
Homelessness <ul><li>There are about 750,000 homeless school-age children in the United States. </li></ul>
Risk Factors <ul><li>Single parent families </li></ul><ul><li>Head of the family is a high school drop-out </li></ul><ul><...
Effects of Poverty on Students <ul><li>Hygiene </li></ul><ul><li>Low self-esteem </li></ul><ul><li>Derision of other stude...
What Can Teachers Do?
Establish High Expectations <ul><li>Let all students know how they are expected to perform </li></ul><ul><li>Try to learn ...
Encourage Parental Involvement <ul><li>Individual “good news” notes about each child’s progress </li></ul><ul><li>Monthly ...
Conclusion <ul><li>Poverty is a very real problem in America. </li></ul><ul><li>Teachers must recognize and understand it ...
Works Cited <ul><li>Knapp, Michael S., and Patrick M. Shields, eds.  Better Schooling for the Children of Poverty: Alterna...
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Poverty In American Education Power Pt

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This is about poverty and how it relates to education.

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Poverty In American Education Power Pt

  1. 1. Poverty in American Education By Blake Bowers
  2. 2. America’s Poor <ul><li>In 2004, the poverty line was $19,484 per year for a family of four. </li></ul><ul><li>That year 37 million Americans lived below the poverty line. This accounts for 12 percent of the population. </li></ul><ul><li>Almost 13 million children live in poverty. </li></ul><ul><li>Children from every race live in poverty. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Homelessness <ul><li>There are about 750,000 homeless school-age children in the United States. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Risk Factors <ul><li>Single parent families </li></ul><ul><li>Head of the family is a high school drop-out </li></ul><ul><li>Family being on welfare </li></ul>
  5. 5. Effects of Poverty on Students <ul><li>Hygiene </li></ul><ul><li>Low self-esteem </li></ul><ul><li>Derision of other students </li></ul><ul><li>Drop-out </li></ul><ul><li>Different world views </li></ul>
  6. 6. What Can Teachers Do?
  7. 7. Establish High Expectations <ul><li>Let all students know how they are expected to perform </li></ul><ul><li>Try to learn about each and every student in your class </li></ul>
  8. 8. Encourage Parental Involvement <ul><li>Individual “good news” notes about each child’s progress </li></ul><ul><li>Monthly newsletters about what is going on in the class </li></ul><ul><li>Parent-teacher conferences </li></ul>
  9. 9. Conclusion <ul><li>Poverty is a very real problem in America. </li></ul><ul><li>Teachers must recognize and understand it to be effective. </li></ul><ul><li>It is possible to reach impoverished students. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Works Cited <ul><li>Knapp, Michael S., and Patrick M. Shields, eds. Better Schooling for the Children of Poverty: Alternatives to Conventional Wisdom . Berkeley, CA: McCutchan Publishing Corporation, 1991. </li></ul><ul><li>Manning, M. Lee, Leroy G. Baruth. Students At Risk . Boston: Allyn and Bacon, 1995. </li></ul><ul><li>Payne, Ruby. “Understanding and Working with Students and Adults form Poverty,” Instructional Leader , March 1996. </li></ul><ul><li>Ryan, Kevin, and James M Cooper. Those Who Can, Teach . 11 th ed. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2007. </li></ul><ul><li>Sagor, Richard. At Risk Students: Reaching and Teaching Them . Swampscott, MA: Watersun Publishing Company, Inc. 1993. </li></ul>
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