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The Creative Value of Bad Ideas
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The Creative Value of Bad Ideas

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A simple computational model that captures creative visual reasoning

A simple computational model that captures creative visual reasoning

Published in: Design

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  • Ideational fluency or quality variance? maximise the total number of ideas vs. the quality of one or a very small number of great ideasHelps to clarify and question assumptions, reveal insights, test hypotheses and in general help our thinking about creativity and potentially inspire innovative research and practice
  • Here, ideas of low accessibility that still satisfy the task’s goal can be considered as preferred over ideas that are commonly found across simulation ru. When r = 1.0, the idea space has a uniform accessibility distribution, whilst as r approaches 0, variance increases indicating that a few ‘gems’ are found in a ‘dense haystack’. ns
  • 2. Combinatorial or derivative processes in ideation are more efficient when they act upon a highly diverse population of initial ideas
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    • 1. The Creative Value of Bad IdeasA Computational Model of Creative IdeationRicardo SosaJohn S. Gero
    • 2. Key ideas1. Ideational fluency vs. quality variance2. Simple computational models to supportinsights for future research and practice3. Assumptions about ideation:1. Some ideas are easier to access than others2. Ideas are connected to each other4. Exploration and exploitation strategies5. Distinguish ideas according to their potential togenerate new ideas
    • 3. Idea accessibilityLikelihood to generate a particular idea or set ofideas for a given design task: conformity metrics(commonplace–original)Idea connectivityLikelihood of one idea leading to other ideas(fitness landscapes, network linkages, trains ofthought)
    • 4. Computational models of creativity1. Generative models:“Can computers ever be creative?”2. Systemic models:“Can computation help us understand creativity?”
    • 5. Computational models of creativityContributions can inform other researchtraditions by:• Framing new hypotheses• Testing the consistency and implications ofassumptions• Proposing new experimental settingsIn-vivo, in-vitro, in-silico studies of creativity
    • 6. Computational model of ideation“Use g geometries of s sides as the initial elements togenerate as many different compositions (g’s’) of morethan g geometries of equal or more s sides”
    • 7. Computational model of ideation{4,0,4,2,0, (3,3,3,4)} {4,1,3,0,2,4, (3,3,4,4)} {3,1,4,1,0, (3,3,6)} {3,2,3,1,0, (4,5,5)} {5,1,5,0,0, (3,3,3,5,5)}Accessibility: givenby mean frequencyof solutions(exploration) overrepeated casesExploitation: aguided searchinformed by rules(‘design concepts’)inferred fromexperienceConnectivity:mapping of designconcepts leading tonew solutions(exploitation)
    • 8. Findings1. Choice of representation shown to influencethe type and degree of creativity2. Exploration/exploitation rate of .25/.75 =highest number of total ideas… due to higheridea variances upon which exploitation buildson novel ideas
    • 9. 3. Ideation types:– Solutions of low-accessibility leading tosolutions of high-accessibility: a “difficultway to reach easy ideas”– Low-accessibility solutions that lead tonew solutions of low accessibility too:“uncommon ideas that yield otheruncommon ideas”– High accessibility ideas connected to lowaccessibility ideas: “easy shortcuts to reachrare ideas”*
    • 10. 4. Bad ideas can be very valuable forcreative ideation:– Low-score or invalid solutions that lead tovaluable and uncommon solutionsTask: “to find 3 or more final geometries and shapes of 5 sides”a) solution {2,1,3,2,0 (3,6)} and b) solution {4,1,3,2,0 (3,3,4,5)}
    • 11. “The best way to get good ideasis to get lots of ideas”“…and the best way to get lots ofideas is to first generate a fewthat are as different as possibleand then strategically build onthem”“…including some seeminglybad ideas”Linus Pauling, the only personto be awarded two unsharedNobel PrizesA very simplecomputational model
    • 12. DiscussionNeeded: research in facilitation techniques thatmonitor idea accessibility –or variance metricsAccessibility-based tools to balanceexploration/exploitation ratioConnectivity-based tools to inform theexploitation strategies
    • 13. DiscussionNew studies and metrics of ideation totarget the value of new ideas based ontheir potential to trigger more ideas