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Making the Web Accessible: Forms and Mulitmedia

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Presentation by Brian Hardy from Vision Australia delivered to the Local Government Web Network Conference 2008

Presentation by Brian Hardy from Vision Australia delivered to the Local Government Web Network Conference 2008

Published in Technology , Design
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Transcript

  • 1. Making the Web Accessible: Forms and Multimedia Local Government Web Network Conference 2008
  • 2. Why is Web Accessibility Important for Local Government?
  • 3. Disability in Australia
    • 4 million people have a disability (ABS Survey)
    • Ageing population and workforce
    • Disabilities having most affect on daily living
      • Vision loss
      • Physical disability
      • Hearing loss
  • 4. The Concept of Print Disability
    • Person with a print disability cannot access “print” content in its standard format.
    • Low Vision
    • No vision
    • Learning disability
    • Physical impairment
  • 5. Legal and General Insurance - UK success story
    • Rebuilt site to meet accessibility guidelines and ensure standards compliance
    • Business benefits
      • Return on Investment within 12 months
      • 90% increase in traffic
      • Conversion rates to sales have increased by 26% - 200%
      • Site maintenance £200,000 saving per year
    • Source: Dave Wilton (L&G), Julie Howell (Fortune Cookie), Jan 2007
  • 6. Legal and Policy Contexts
    • Disability Discrimination Act 1992
      • HREOC Web Accessibility Advisory Notes (2002)
      • Intranets & Extranets also covered
    • Government Policies
      • Australian Govt. Web Publishing Guidelines
      • Each State & Territory has similar guidelines
  • 7. When is Content Accessible?
  • 8. Accessibility is Experiential
    • Person with a disability should be able to use data, information and services as effectively as someone without a disability
    • Compliance with technical rules is necessary, but not sufficient
      • W3C Web Content Accessibility Guidelines
  • 9. Accessible Content
    • Must be:
    • Perceivable
    • Operable
    • Understandable
    • Robust
  • 10. Web Content Accessibility Guidelines – W3C
    • Version 1 - Current reference standard www.w3.org/TR/WCAG10/
    • Version 2 - In final draft stage (likely in 2009) www.w3.org/TR/WCAG20/
  • 11. Making Content & Functionality Accessible Accessible Forms Accessible Multimedia
  • 12.
    • Forms are used to :
    • Submit applications
    • Contact organisations
    • Request information
    • Access account information
    • Search a website
    • Pay an account
    Forms
  • 13. Typical Forms
  • 14. Example
  • 15. Accessibility Outcome
    • A web-delivered PDF Form is:
    • A lot better than going to council offices and completing the form there
      • Can use some assistive technology at home
      • Do not have to use the phone
      • No need to confront mobility challenges
    • A little better than requesting the form by phone and receiving it in the post
      • Can use some assistive technology at home
      • Do not have to use the phone
  • 16. Accessibility Problems
    • Cannot complete it online
    • Screen reader may not be able understand form
    • Solutions
      • HTML form is the best option (for users and for organisation)
      • Possible to make a PDF form completable and accessible, but technically difficult
  • 17. Example Form
  • 18. Example Continued
  • 19. Accessibility Outcome
    • Better than a PDF for many people
      • Can use some assistive technology
      • Can complete the form online
      • Do not have to use the phone
      • No need to confront mobility challenges
  • 20. Accessibility Problems
    • Hard to complete it online
    • Screen reader may not be able understand form instructions
    • Confusing – particularly for screen magnifier users
    • No option to print form
      • Hard to use with some assistive technology
  • 21. Zoom 4X Magnification
  • 22. Normal Size
  • 23. Another Example
  • 24. Laid out using tables
  • 25.
    • Clearly identify required fields
    Forms
  • 26.
    • Position labels correctly
      • Position labels before input boxes, text areas and dropdown boxes.
      • Position labels immediately after checkboxes and radio buttons.
      • Ensure that labels are close to their corresponding input controls.
    Forms
  • 27.
    • Ensure that all label text is clear and unique
    Forms
  • 28.
    • Associate labels with the corresponding input controls
    Forms <label for=“name”> Name: </label> <input id=“name” />
  • 29.
    • Group form items into sections using <fieldset> and <legend>
    Forms
    • <fieldset>
      • <legend> Personal Details </legend>
      • ...FORM CONTENT GOES HERE…
    • </fieldset>
  • 30.
    • Recap:
      • Test with mouse and keyboard
      • Clearly identify required fields
      • Position labels correctly
      • Use clear and unique labels
      • Associate labels with the input
      • Set the font size in relative units
      • Group similar areas together
    Forms summary
  • 31. Accessible Multimedia
    • Captions
    • Auslan
    • Audio description
      • Embedded between words
      • Extended, via video pause
    • Full text equivalent
      • Transcript
      • Other sounds
      • Audio description
  • 32. Web Accessibility Workshops
    • To find out more –
    • Introductory & techniques workshops in 2008:
    • Sydney: 12 & 13 November
    • Brisbane: 3 & 4 September
    • Canberra: 5 & 6 November
    • Melbourne: 15 & 16 October
    • www.visionaustralia.org.au/training
  • 33. Vision Australia Contacts
    • Brian Hardy, Gaynor Eccleston
    • Vision Australia: Accessible Information Solutions
      • 45 4 Glenferrie Road, Kooyong Vic 3144
      • 4 Mitchell Street, Enfield NSW 2136
      • Kent Street, Woolloongabba Qld 4102
      • Web Accessibility Team: 1300 367 055
      • [email_address]
      • [email_address]
      • www.visionaustralia.org.au/ais
  • 34. Vision Australia – Consulting Services
    • Vision Australia – Accessible Information Solutions
    • Web accessibility
      • Accessibility testing and audits
      • Accessibility advice & support
      • Accessibility “Help Desk” (ad hoc advice)
      • Customised web workshops and seminars for various in-house audiences
    • Accessibility advice and training in relation to buildings and the physical environment
  • 35. Vision Australia – Production Services
    • Preparation of transcripts for audio files, videos and Flash movies
    • PDF – creation of “accessible” versions
    • PDF – creation of accessible interactive forms
    • Alternative formats production – audio, Braille, large-print, tactile signs