Communicating with learners and parents<br />Lecturer: Nestor Chan<br />University of Belize<br />MarlenySanchez, Matilda ...
Content:<br />What is communication<br />The triad concept<br />Effective communication<br />Delivery<br />Class participa...
What is communication?<br /><ul><li>Communication is a dialogue which comes from the words diaand logos(meaning or reason ...
everyone who is part of the conversation
 Accurate information
assessment, method, and sample
Clearly defined symbols
grades, ratings, checkmarks, percentages, smiley faces, etc.
Communication tailored to the audience
detailed,  frequent, vocabulary,  multiple intelligence, cultural & social backgrounds, etc. </li></li></ul><li>Delivery<b...
Class Participation<br />Daily review:  “I learnt…” <br />Clarify points of confusion<br />New material: main points and e...
Class Participation<br />Praises or encouragements: <br />Give kudos to student’s efforts. <br />Make jokes that release t...
Helpful Strategies:<br />Address students as equals.<br />Listen to students and their responses.<br />Pair students or sm...
Helpful Strategies:<br />Give constant appraisals.<br />Feed their ideas.<br />Be friendly and courteous.<br />Respect div...
Negative Communication<br />Stern discipline<br />Strict conformity to regulations<br />Setting unattainable standards<br ...
Involving Parents<br />Letting the parents know:<br />Where we are going.<br />Where we are.<br />How to close the gap.<br...
Involving Parents<br />Teachers should create opportunities to participate in the education efforts of the school.<br />Co...
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Communicating with learners and parents

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This PowerPoint was done for a group presentation in a course, "classroom assessments." In fact, we have yet to present, but this is quality ppt that will earn us an A.

Communicating with learners and parents is essential for student's success.

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  • Rolando: What is communication The triad concept Effective communication DeliveryMarleny Class participation Strategies Negative communicationMatilda Parent involvement Conclusion
  • Communicating with learners and parents

    1. 1. Communicating with learners and parents<br />Lecturer: Nestor Chan<br />University of Belize<br />MarlenySanchez, Matilda Shal, and Rolando Cocom<br />
    2. 2. Content:<br />What is communication<br />The triad concept<br />Effective communication<br />Delivery<br />Class participation<br />Strategies<br />Negative communication<br />Parent involvement<br />Conclusion<br />
    3. 3. What is communication?<br /><ul><li>Communication is a dialogue which comes from the words diaand logos(meaning or reason flowing through or across). Dialogue may begin with the simplest of human interactions. (Hoy, and Miskel, 2004). </li></li></ul><li>The Triad Concept <br /><ul><li>There are three factors</li></ul> present: the teacher, the student, and the parents. <br /><ul><li>The interactions among these three actors largely determine the student’s willingness and readiness to learn. (Attitudes and behaviors). (Peter, 1998)</li></li></ul><li>Conditions for effective communication: <br /><ul><li>Understanding of the learning targets
    4. 4. everyone who is part of the conversation
    5. 5. Accurate information
    6. 6. assessment, method, and sample
    7. 7. Clearly defined symbols
    8. 8. grades, ratings, checkmarks, percentages, smiley faces, etc.
    9. 9. Communication tailored to the audience
    10. 10. detailed, frequent, vocabulary, multiple intelligence, cultural & social backgrounds, etc. </li></li></ul><li>Delivery<br />Objectives: Where are we going? <br />Make it clear why the information is interesting and important.<br />Motivation: Motivate students to attend the lesson. <br />Intriguing questions, anecdotes, jokes, riddles. <br />Transition: Provide connections to help students integrate old and new information. (Application)<br />Clarification: Do not inundate student with “too much too fast”. <br />Scaffolding: Step-by-step practice, encourage student collaboration and understanding<br />
    11. 11. Class Participation<br />Daily review: “I learnt…” <br />Clarify points of confusion<br />New material: main points and examples. <br />Specific feedback- Correct/incorrect answers to questions <br /> are acknowledged.<br />Cooperative learning<br />Accepts feelings in a non-threatening manner. <br />
    12. 12. Class Participation<br />Praises or encouragements: <br />Give kudos to student’s efforts. <br />Make jokes that release tension, but not at the expense of another individual. <br />Accept or use ideas of pupils: clarify, or develop ideas suggested by a student. <br />Ask questions: Ask question first then call on someone to answer. <br />A lower-order question and higher-order question. Recall then reasoning. <br />
    13. 13.
    14. 14. Helpful Strategies:<br />Address students as equals.<br />Listen to students and their responses.<br />Pair students or small groups<br />Display genuine attention and interest; going the “extra mile”<br />Role reversal: they become the experts and source of knowledge<br />Allow them to talk about themselves. (Affective domain)<br />
    15. 15. Helpful Strategies:<br />Give constant appraisals.<br />Feed their ideas.<br />Be friendly and courteous.<br />Respect diversity.<br />Content knowledge<br />Have patience.<br />Conducive learning environment<br />Authentic resources<br />
    16. 16. Negative Communication<br />Stern discipline<br />Strict conformity to regulations<br />Setting unattainable standards<br />Emotional outbursts<br />Sarcasm<br />Excessive home works and assignments<br />Recurrent low grades<br />These may lead to frustration, poorly prepared assignments, inability directions, careless work, and overall dislike of teacher and school.<br />
    17. 17.
    18. 18. Involving Parents<br />Letting the parents know:<br />Where we are going.<br />Where we are.<br />How to close the gap.<br />Teachers must have good intentions to collaborate with parents.<br />Clear information on all school policies, academic programs, and transitions (Michael, Diana, 2001)<br />Effective newsletters about school events, student activities, and parent’s questions and reactions<br />
    19. 19. Involving Parents<br />Teachers should create opportunities to participate in the education efforts of the school.<br />Conferences with every parent -with follow-ups as needed<br />Folders of student work sent home regularly for parent review and comments<br />Give parents invitations through notes written by pupils or formal announcements to meet with parents. <br />
    20. 20. Involving Parents<br />Meeting once with parents is rarely enough to get consistent behavior on either part of parents or a child. <br />Parents must know the objectives of education, activities, and assignments. <br />Perception and attitudes:<br />Teacher ego: I know best, I…<br />Friends and fellow workers. <br />
    21. 21. Involving Parents<br />Engagement in learning actives at home: homework help, projects<br />Guidelines of parents involvement<br />Objectives of lessons, and assessments<br />Workshops for parents: discipline, drug abuse prevention, assessment aid, internet<br />How many parents feel capable to help their children? <br />Support groups<br />Sharing parenting tips<br />Social gatherings<br />Home visiting programs<br />Parents should know in what areas they can help their children.<br />
    22. 22. Conclusion:<br />The teacher’s principal role is to transmit knowledge to students. <br />To do so, the teacher must communicate effectively in order to facilitate learning. <br />There is a need to establish and maintain good personal relationships with students and parents. <br />
    23. 23. Reference:<br />Coleman, Peter. (1998). Parent, student and teacher collaboration: the power of three. London, UK: Corwin Press Inc. <br />Chamberlain, Leo M., and KindredLeslie W. (1996). The teacher and school organizations. Englewood cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall<br />Hoy Wayne, and Miskel Cecil, (2004). Educational leadership and reform. United States. Information Publishing Inc. <br />Michael, Diana. (2001). Promising practices for family involvement in schools. United States. Information Publishing Inc.<br />Stiggins, R., Arter, J., Chappuis, J., & Chappuis, S. (2007). Classroom assessment for student learning: Doing it right – using it well. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall. <br />
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