Drafting Instructions--Introductions

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Drafting Instructions--Introductions

  1. 1. Opening / introduction<br />Drafting Instructions<br />
  2. 2. Title Page<br />Be descriptive<br />Reader should have a clear idea about tutorial just by reading the title<br />Think about YouTube and other searches<br />Creative titles are “creative” but may not make it easier for user to know by reading title what the tutorial covers<br />
  3. 3. Introduction<br />Establish the context, <br />Purpose, and <br />Organization of the instructions. <br />
  4. 4. Introduction<br />Plan the introduction to your instructions carefully. <br />Indicate specific tasks or procedure to be explained as well as the scope of coverage (what won’t be covered).<br />Indicate what the audience needs in terms of knowledge and background to understand the instructions.<br />Give a general idea of the procedure and what it accomplishes.<br />Indicate the conditions when these instructions should (or should not) be used.<br />Give an overview of the contents of the instructions.<br />
  5. 5. Prerequisites<br />Technical background or theory.<br />What knowledge or skills does user need before beginning<br />background related to the procedure. <br />To really understand what you’re doing, you may need some background on topic. <br />
  6. 6. Requirements: Equipment & supplies<br />Include a list of the things you need to gather before you start the procedure. <br />equipment, the tools you use in the procedure (such as mixing bowls, spoons, bread pans, hammers, drills, and saws) and<br />supplies, the things that are consumed in the procedure (such as wood, paint, oil, flour, and nails). <br />typically listed either in a simple vertical list or in a two-column list. <br />Use the two-column list if you need to add some specifications to some or all of the items—for example, brand names, sizes, amounts, types, model numbers, and so on.<br />
  7. 7. Dangers, Cautions, Notes<br />Alert readers to the possibility of ruining their equipment, screwing up the procedure, and hurting themselves. <br />emphasize key points or exceptions. For these situations, you use special notices—note, warning, caution, and danger notices. <br />Warn user<br />physical, (can they get harmed physically)<br />personal safety (will they need to protect personal information)<br />Property safety (will they need to protect software or other personal belongings)<br />
  8. 8. Examples of Instruction Introductions<br />http://www.prismnet.com/~hcexres/textbook/instrxx2c.html — good text example; gives you sense of introduction<br />http://bf.memphis.edu/spectrum/introduction.php — very good and detailed introduction; provides quite a bit of background<br />
  9. 9. Examples<br />Simple Staining<br />Photoshop Pop-Art<br />
  10. 10. Sources<br />McMurrey, David A. Online Technical Writing: Online Textbook — Contents<br />

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