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Pecha Kucha - Beware, test takers! Real work ahead.
 

Pecha Kucha - Beware, test takers! Real work ahead.

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My first Pecha Kucha to be presented at the education conference KUL 2014. It is about a university course that I inherited and the story of me changing it into a more real-life relevant course.

My first Pecha Kucha to be presented at the education conference KUL 2014. It is about a university course that I inherited and the story of me changing it into a more real-life relevant course.

A film of me presenting this Pecha Kucha can be seen here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uo6sji08OBY

Some key points include a real-world based case, game-based midterm-exam scoring and double loop feedback.

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    Pecha Kucha - Beware, test takers! Real work ahead. Pecha Kucha - Beware, test takers! Real work ahead. Presentation Transcript

    • Beware, test-takers! Real work ahead. ! Per Olof Arnäs Technology Management and Economics per-olof.arnas@chalmers.se slides on slideshare.net/poar …or: ”How I inherited a course and changed almost everything.” New Science Lecture Theatre at UCT by Ian Barbour on Flickr (CC-BY,SA)
    • Existing class dismissed by Robert S. Donovan on Flickr (CC-BY) (very traditional) me iti cs a r ti M is log 30 stu -50 de nts course Physical distribution planning 3-ye (”ka ar pro ndid gra m at”, BSc ) Lectures Calc-exercises Group project Exam In Swedish
    • Existing course - 2012 ”Te le” rrib ”Too man y teache How much did the lectures help your learning process? 34%: Very little 34%: Little 30%: Much 0%: Very much o ”N ”Felt like th organ e cou rse w ized t the fir he day be as fore st lec ture” oc f s” u rs” ”Th e ex rea am w lly b as ad!” What is your overall impression of the course 44%: Very bad 28%: Bad 28%: Good 0%: Very good Next: My beliefs don't panic! by Jon Moe on Flickr (CC-BY)
    • My beliefs Understan ding is mu ch more impo rtant than knowledge of facts Written exams (” tentor”) is a bad way to e nsure knowledge and understanding es not iety do ers Soc est-tak want t
    • Understan ding is mu ch more impo rtant than knowledge of facts My beliefs Written exams (” tentor”) is a bad way to e nsure knowledge and understanding My job is to m ake my studen ts unde the sub rstand ject be tter an faster d than I d id as a studen t myse lf es not iety do ers Soc est-tak want t c ing n eng e fu a ll ch an b A ec urs o Next: Four pillars
    • Four pillars Book (midterm tests) Papers (midterm tests and seminars) Case part 1 Case part 2 This article was downloaded by: [Chalmers University of Technology] On: 20 August 2013, At: 00:49 Postponement, speculation and the structure of distribution channels Publisher: Taylor & Francis Louis P Bucklin JMR, Journal of Marketing Research (pre-1986); Feb 1965; 2, 000001; ABI/INFORM Global Informa Ltd Registered in England and Wales Registered Number: 1072954 Registered pg. 26 office: Mortimer House, 37-41 Mortimer Street, London W1T 3JH, UK International Journal of Logistics Research and Applications: A Leading Journal of Supply Chain Management European Journal of Purchasing & Supply Management 8 (2002) 3–14 Procurement of logistics servicesFa minutes work or a multi-year project? Publication details, including instructions for authors and subscription information: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/cjol20 Dan Anderssona,*, Andreas Norrmanb is available at The Emerald Research Register for this journal Centralised distribution systems and the environment: how increased transport work can decrease the environmental impact of logistics a Christofer Kohn & Maria Huge Brodin a The current issue and full text archive of this journal is available at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/researchregister . Department of Management and Economics, Logistics Management, Linkopings Universitet, SE-581 83 Linkoping, Sweden http://www.emeraldinsight.com/0960-0035.htm . b Department of Industrial Management and Logistics, Lund University, P.O. Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden Abstract IJPDLM 33,2 Increasing customer value and decreasing distribution costs with merge-in-transit The purpose of the article is to describe and compare the purchasing process for advanced versus basic logistics services. Further some specific observations are presented from the procurement of advanced third-party logistics services, with respect to service definitions, providers evaluations and contracts. The purchasing process of logistics services will in the future need to be more differentiated due to current business trends. Hence companies must analyse how these new procurement situations will impact on their purchasing processes in order to understand what new resources, routines and competence they need to have in order to purchase logistics services in an effective way. r 2002 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. a a Division of Logistics Management, Department of Management and Engineering (IEI), Linköping University, SE 581 83, Linköping, Sweden Published online: 07 Apr 2008. 132 ¨ ¨ ¨ Mikko Karkkainen, Timo Ala-Risku and Jan Holmstrom Keywords: Purchasing process; Services; Third-party logistics Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, Helsinki University of Technology, Helsinki, Finland Keywords Logistics, Supply-chain management, Customers, Value, Distribution, Strategy Transport Logistics, Vol. 1, No. 3, pp. 181– 194 (1998)  VSP 1998. To cite this article: Christofer Kohn & Maria Huge Brodin (2008) Centralised distribution systems and the environment: how increased transport work can decrease the environmental impact of logistics, International Journal of Logistics Research and Applications: A Leading Journal of Supply Chain Management, 11:3, 229-245 1. Introduction A changing context and new demands on logistics are driving an ongoing transformation and differentiation of the buying process for logistics services. Logistics services purchased some years ago were usually quite easy to define and the purchase decision was mainly based on the price of the service. Those basic logistics services constitute still the big volume offered and bought, but they are increasingly bought in bundles (van Laarhoven et al., 2000; Andersson, 1997; Sink and Langley, 1997; Berglund, 2000). At the same time, different value adding services and IT services are increasingly included in the bundles of services, which are handled in so-called third-party logistics relationships (Andersson, 1997; van Laarhoven et al., 2000). This development increases the complexity of the purchasing process of logistics. The increasingly more advanced tasks companies are trying to outsource today (e.g. logistics management) are much harder to specify and the companies are also not used to doing this. Van Hoek (2000) argues that there is a need for further To link to this article: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13675560701628919 A model of tiering in third-party logistics with a service parts distribution case study PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR ARTICLE Taylor & Francis makes every effort to ensure the accuracy of all the information (the “Content”) contained in the publications on our platform. However, Taylor & Francis, MATS ABRAHAMSSON and STEN WANDEL∗ our agents, and our licensors make no representations or warranties whatsoever as to An executive summary for the accuracy, completeness, or suitability for any Economics, Institute of Technology,Any ¨opinions Department of Management and purpose of the Content. Linkoping University, managers and executive S-581 83 Linkoping, Sweden ¨ and views expressed in this publication are the opinions and views of the authors,can be found at the readers and are not the views of or endorsed by Taylor & Francis. The accuracy of the Content end of this article should not be relied upon and should be independently verified with primary sources of information. Taylor and Francis shall not be liable for any losses, actions, claims, Abstract—In this article we have and other liabilities whatsoever or proceedings, demands, costs, expenses, damages,expanded Professor James Cooper’s discussions of ‘mega carriers’ for howsoever caused arising one-stop shopping of logisticsin connection with, in relation to or arising in third-party directly or indirectly services to a multi-tiering model to describe different alliances logistics. To be able to support the increasing demands of shippers, a third-party logistics provider must out of the use of the Content. Relationships among TPL providers and members of supply chains ± a strategic perspective Anu H. Bask *Tel.: +46-13-28-1521; fax: +46-13-28-2513. E-mail addresses: danan@eki.liu.se (D. Andersson), Research Associate, Department of Marketing and Logistics, Helsinki andreas.norrman@tlog.lth.se (A. Norrman). School of Economics and Business Administration, Helsinki, Finland have a portfolio with many different services, either in-house or available from a supplier network. As a research and understanding of purchasing initiatives Abstract A broad product assortment is usually valued highly by customers. However, holding a supporting the establishment of supplementary logistics great number of product variants in inventory increases the costs of a supplier. It is possible to services. We will in this article discuss the kind of reduce need for warehousing with direct deliveries from manufacturing units, but customer value procurement included in the procurement of advanced is reduced when orders are received on several shipments. Merge-in-transit is a distribution logistics services. But we will in the discussion also method in which goods shipped from several supply locations are consolidated into one final include routine purchases of basic services e.g. by the use customer delivery while they are in transit. This article examines the effects of merge-in-transit of an Internet freight exchange. While the firstanalysis is performed with a maintenance, repair, and distribution on delivery costs. The type of process may take several yearsdistributor as the case may operations products to finalise the latter company. The evidence in this article supports the claim be only a minutes work. The being a cost the article is to of merge-in-transit purpose of efficient distribution alternative in business networks. Based on the describe and compare the purchasing in multi-company networks should study the possibility of using results advocates that companies process for logistics services for companies following either the the merge-in-transit delivery model. trend towards outsourcing of more advanced logistics services, which will be emphasised here, or the trend Introduction towards leveraging the internet as a tool in their buying Presenting more valuable especially of basic services. Further lessons learned from solutions to customers while decreasing the the procurement of advanced third-party logistics will be associated costs is the biggest challenge and main goal in supply chain shared. The article is conceptual in itset al., 2001, p. 7). The traditional way to create customer management (Hoover nature, but based on empirical material that has been collected over value is to offer a broad assortment of products at as low a price as possible several years of contacts with shippers, both in research (Bowersox et al., research. The article projects and variants of action 2000). However, broadening the product assortment also increases the costs of the supplier (Putsis and Bayus, 2001; Boatwright and takes its starting point in the characteristics of service procurement and the business trends influencing logisNunes, 2001). Successful companies create customer value in such a way that tics. Thereafter two emerging markettrade-off is reached and the profit contribution for the an optimal cost/benefit areas are illustrated and, based on this, a comparison of different company is maximised (Christopher, 1992, pp. 24-52). Nevertheless, the most types of purchasing processes is made. This results in the valuable important phases in the purchasidentification of threesolutions are those that increase customer value while simultaneously reducing discussed in greater detail. ing process, which arecosts. consequence, third-party logistics cannot be reduced to purposes. Any This article may be used for research, teaching, and private studyan alliance between a single shipper and a single 0969-7012/02/$ - see front matter r 2002 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. provider. Both the shipper and the provider are also loan, in other alliances and PII: S 0 9 6 9 - 7 0 2 ( 0 1 ) 0 0 0 1 Logistics Keywords Buyer-seller relationships, Supply-chain 1management, 8 - 1 substantial or systematic reproduction, redistribution, reselling, involved sub-licensing, these often strongly interact with the shipper– provider relationship. Furthermore, this relationship varies across the different Abstract Outsourcing of logistics services has increased rapidly during the last few systematic supply, or distribution in any form to anyone is expressly forbidden. Terms & Providing all the products that the customer needs, and delivering them in one drop-off is a valuable service for the customer (Bowersox et al., 2000). A wide product offering is important as customers can then use fewer suppliers, reducing their co-ordination and transaction costs (Daniels and Klimis, 1999). phases of third-party logistics projects: design, development, implementation, and operation. Therefore, years. Accordingly, third-party logistics and supply chain management as a research phenomenon has gained increased attention from academia. However, a strategic view Getting everything delivered in one lot is important for the customer, because in order to broaden the picture and to extend the modelling of Cooper and others, we suggest a five-layer focusing on the relationship between supply chain management and third-party logistics International Journal of Physical model with users and four tiers of logistic service providers for the description and analysis of logistics service strategies has gained little attention. This paper focuses on alternative supply Distribution & Logistics Management The authors would like to acknowledge Hannu Heikkonen from Kauppatalo Hansel Oy for his and transport industry issues in general and third-party logistics in particular. This conceptual model chain strategies and their relationship to different types of third-party logistics services. AVol. 33 No. 2, 2003 is Journal of Transport Geography normative framework for organizing these relationships is developed. The strategic viewpp. 132-148 co-operation, and his fruitful ideas during the case study. 12 (2004) 171–184 also indebted to The authors are then illustrated and validated by a case study describing the implementation of an alliance which involved www.elsevier.com/locate/jtrangeo q MCB UP Limited adopted in this paper fills a gap in the understanding of how third-party logistics ¨ ¨¨ ¨ ¨¨ ¨ TEKES, Tekniikan edistamissaatio and Kuorma-autoliikenteen Volvo-saatio for the funding of the redesign of a European distribution operation for service parts. 0960-0035 providers should offer their services more effectively and efficiently to different types ofDOI 10.1108/09600030310469144 this research. supply chains. Keywords: Third-party logistics; tiering; logistics alliances; logistic service providers; European distribuIntroduction tion; freight transport industry. Marketing reasons for There are very good marketing reasons for why we should focus on research research into third-party logistics services and their relation without chain Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction prohibited to supply permission. management. First, the outsourcing of logistics services is expected to increase (Ohmae, 1989; Coyle et al., 1992). It will continue to evolve at least INTRODUCTION in Europe (Peters et al., 1998) and USA. The majority of CEOs of large logistics service providers in Europe believed (Peters et al., 1998) that the Modern logistics demands a high level of expertise in key areas, such as distribution annual industry growth rate over the period 1998-2000 would be around 20 strategy, materials handling and inventory control, purchasing, transport planning, percent. With regard to the USA, the estimated sales growth was from $15 billion (1996) to $50 billion by the year 2000, a yearly growth of as high as information system, and the ability to manage change, especially within multinational 40 organizations with several different subsidiaries. If one or more of these key areas are percent of the market within a period of three years. Second, the thirdparty logistics (TPL) industry is a young and emerging industry (Kuglin, Transport Logistics, Vol. 1, No. 3, pp. 181– 194 (1998) not operating correctly, it has a negative impact on the effectiveness and efficiency p. 227; Sink et al., 1996; Sink and Langley, 1997) which promises a 1998,  VSP 1998. of the total logistics system. Externalizing logistics to third-party operators is often positive future for the logistics industry. Third, the scope of services that third-party logistics providers are offering is expanding, and TPL providers with this problem. The shipper’s core competence is are aggressively Transportation Research Part A 41 (2007) 280–285 interest in improving their operations. Finally, customer then supplemented by outside expertise in other key areas. outsourcing a wider amount of logistics services has increased (Peters et al., 1998). All these factors have led to an increasing need for the holistic management of logistics services (Juga and Willberg, 1998) and their ∗ To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: stewa@eki.liu.se efficient organization from both the supply chain and third-party logistics providers' point of view in order to improve effectiveness and efficiency in supply chains. The current issue and full text archive of this journal is available at advocated www.emeraldinsight.com/1741-0401.htm as a way of dealing 100 s max point IJPPM 58,1 54 The transport geography of logistics and freight distribution Markus Hesse a , Jean-Paul Rodrigue parts distribution case study their services toward differentLaetitia Dablanc has gained little types of supply chains, * attention. A great deal of successful and versatile academic research was Department of Industrial and Mechanical Engineering and Computer Science, produced during the 1990s in third-party logistics phenomena. However, the INRETS, French National Institute for Research on Transport and its Safety, 19, rue Alfred Nobel, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland and MATS ABRAHAMSSON and STEN WANDEL∗ Cite Descartes, Champs sur Marne, 77455 Marne la Vallee Cedex 2, France Division of Logistics and Transportation, Chalmers University of Technology, The for this journal is available at Department of Management and Economics, Institute of Technology, Linkoping University, research register Received 15 February 2006; accepted 24 May 2006 ¨ ¨ http://www.mcbup.com/research_registers Goteborg, Sweden,S-581 83 Linkoping, Sweden and ¨ Keywords: Logistics; Geography; Freight Transport; Physical distribution; Globalization 1. Logistics and freight transport: from derived to integrated demand 1.1. Introduction The growing flows of freight have been a fundamental component of contemporary changes in economic systems at the global, regional and local scales. The consideration of these changes must be made within a perspective where they are not merely quantitative, but Abstract 470 JOURNAL OF BUSINESS & INDUSTRIAL MARKETING, VOL. 16 NO. 6 2001, pp. 470-486, # MCB UNIVERSITY PRESS, 0885-8624 structural and operational. Structural changes mainly Abstract—In this article we have expanded Professor James Cooper’s discussions of ‘mega carriers’ for involve manufacturing systems with their geography of Abstract one-stop shopping of logistics services to a multi-tiering model to describe this article, I wish in third-party In different alliances to present three characteristics of urban goods movements in major European cities: (1) Goods production, while operational changes mainly concern Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to use the conceptual model of be able to Transportation logistics. To the Smart support the increasing demands of shippers,movements arelogistics indifferentmust internal structure of cities. (2) Urban policies targeted on freight mobility appear transportation with its geography of distribution. a third-party largely provider to the freight Management (STM) system and analyze how the included factors change the performance of to be from a supplier network. As a have a portfolio with many different services, either in-house or availablequite inefficient. (3) The provision of appropriate urban logistic services is slow in emerging despite growing needs. As such, the fundamental question does not necessarily distribution activities and what management issues are at stake. These features have been and a single consequence, third-party logistics cannot be reduced to an alliance between a single shipper observed over the last five or six years through working with large metropolitan transport author- in the nature, origins and destinations of freight reside Design/methodology/approach – To prepare the paper, a literature study was made and case ities, as well and these French national provider. Both the shipper and the provider are also involved in other alliances as with the often strongly research program on ‘‘Goods in Cities’’ and the ‘‘Best Urban Freight Solutions’’ movements, but how this freight is moving. New modes studies carried out in companies and organizations that are included in advanced transportation setups, European varies across the different of production are concomitant with new modes of disinteract with the shipper– provider relationship. Furthermore, this relationship network. These observations draw a picture of the urban freight industry, which can appear quite critical. including infrastructure providers, carriers, truck manufacturers, software providers, shippers, and more. Indeed, many initiatives have emerged to make this industry less routine and more efficient, especially regarding its envitribution, which brings forward the realm of logistics; phases three major components projects: Findings – The main finding of the study is a model that includes of third-party logistics of smart design, development, implementation, and operation. Therefore, ronmental impacts as well as its level of quality of service. However, changes are slow, and on the whole, it appears as transportation management, namely, smart goods, smart vehicles andbroaden the picture and to extend the modelling of Cooper and others, we suggest a five-layer in order to smart infrastructure. These of components embrace some factors that have effects on model with users and fourhowever, logistic service providers for thethough none andthe stakeholders are willing to make fast progress: on the one side, city governments expect business to supply chain performance; tiers of to description analysis of logistics set up new logistic services fit to the emerging needs of the customers and retailers as well as beneficial to the environment; different extents. * and transport industry issues in general and third-party logistics in on the other side, logisticians are waiting for municipalities to initiate (and subsidize) new services before starting busiparticular. This conceptual model is Corresponding author. Tel.: +49-30-838-70209; fax: +49-30-838Research limitations/implications – The paper uses a framework for the smart transportation 70749. then illustrated and validated by a case study describing the implementation of an could prove poorly profitable and highly risky. Despite this tendency for status quo in the urban freight nesses which alliance which involved management system that is useful when studying advanced transportation management systems, the E-mail address: mhesse@zedat.fu-berlin.de (M. Hesse). functions that need to be supported and what factors have the redesign of achain performance. effects on supply European distribution operation for service parts. industry, some solutions can be identified, which I present in the concluding chapter of this paper. The current issue and full text archive of this journal is available at http://www.emerald-library.com/ft Kenth Lumsden Division of Logistics and Transportation, Chalmers University of Technology, ¨ Goteborg, Sweden Ó 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Practical implications – Practical implications are mainly based on the structure of the smart transportation system that is used and the identified factorsKeywords: the performance of the supply logistics alliances; logistic service providers; European distributhat affect Third-party logistics; tiering; Keywords: Urban freight; Policies and planning; City logistics; Regulations; Trucks; Deliveries chain, as these factors can be influenced by logistics management. tion; freight transport industry. Originality/value – The framework used in this research is a new development that collects advanced functions of goods identification, vehicle information systems and infrastructure systems into one conceptual model for smart transportation management that include some factors that are affecting supply chain performance. INTRODUCTION Keywords Transportation, Supply chain management, Performance management Paper type Research paper International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management Vol. 58 No. 1, 2009 pp. 54-70 q Emerald Group Publishing Limited 1741-0401 DOI 10.1108/17410400910921083 0966-6923/$ - see front matter Ó 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j.jtrangeo.2003.12.004 0. Introduction Modern logistics demands a high level of expertise in key areas, such as distribution A large number of different types of freight flows constantly cross an urban environment, including constrategy, materials handling and inventory control, purchasing, transport materials, waste products, postal mail and others. These flows occupy about one fourth sumer goods, building planning, Introduction information system, and the ability to manage change, especially within multinational In the pursuit of higher efficiencies in companies’ supply chains, new business models are engaging an increasing number of participants, making the management of the organizations with several different subsidiaries. If one or more of these key areas are chains, including transportation operations, more difficult and the risk for exceptions a negative impact on the effectiveness and efficiency not operating correctly, it has higher. By employing more complex business models, the need for more customized of the total logistics system. Externalizing logistics to * Tel.: +33 1 64operators is often 15 21 40. third-party 15 21 03; fax: +33 1 64 logistics solutions increases and the need for more efficient execution escalates. advocated better information and E-mail address: laetitia.dablanc@inrets.fr Efficient execution relies on better planning that in turn calls for as a way of dealing with this problem. The shipper’s core competence is then supplemented by services better monitoring and controlling of transportation operation. The complexoutside expertise in other key areas. 0965-8564/$ - see front matter Ó 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j.tra.2006.05.005 ∗ To b Next: Research papers Performance issues of Smart Goods transport in large European cities: Difficult Transportation Management A spite of to organize, difficult to modernize the holistic systems model of tiering in third-party logistics with aInservice above mentioned reasons, thelogistics strategic view, which aims to answer the question how third-party providers should offer Gunnar Stefansson a,* Department of Earth Sciences, Urban Studies, Free University of Berlin, Malteserstr. 74-100 D-12249 Berlin, Germany b Department of Economics and Geography, Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY 11549, USA Abstract Goods movement and freight distribution are widely underrepresented in regional science and geographical research. This is surprising since a large body of traditional spatial theory has been developed with respect to transportation costs or to trade areas: those aspects that were originally closely connected with the exchange of goods. Growing attention is being paid in geography to related subjects, such as the emergence of global production networks, to structural changes in retail or to the commodification of modern consumption. To a certain extent, these processes depend upon the efficient transfer of information, finance and physical goods. Yet, with a few exceptions, the freight sector appears to be neglected in contemporary research. This paper provides an overview of the emerging transport geography of logistics and freight distribution. It challenges the traditional perspective where transportation is considered as a derived demand with the idea that logistical requirements underline transportation as a component of an integrated demand. The paper provides an analysis of the evolution of logistics as it pertains to the core dimensions of www.elsevier.com/locate/tra transport geography (flows, nodes/locations and networks). The concept of logistical friction is also introduced to illustrate the inclusion of the multidimensional notion of impedance in integrated freight transport demand. Ó 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: stewa@eki.liu.se the science of physical distribution. Although it represents an entire system of space/time interdependencies, we believe that physical distribution has been neglected in current geographical, urban or regional studies. Up to recently, geography did not pay much attention to logistics and freight transportation, as the focus was mainly on passengers and individual mobility issues. Textbooks on urban or general transport geography, like those edited by Hanson (1995), Taaffe et al. (1996) or Hoyle and Knowles (1998), now raise more freight related questions than they did in earlier editions, particularly with regard to trade and ports. The latter is probably the only logistics subject that received major reference from academic geography. Other core spatial implications of distribution and logistics have been directly addressed in geography by few authors who developed an insight into wholesale activities and their geographical distribution (Glasmeier, 1992; McKinnon, 1983, 1988, 1998; Riemers, 1998; Vance, 1970). Following the nature of retailing as an originally distributive activity, geographic research on retail and consumption is of interest in the logistics context too. However, retail geography does not pay much attention to distribution changes (Marsden and Wrigley, 1996),
    • Research papers 2 seminars Each group has 1 paper Present OUTSOURCING LOGISTICS IN PARTNERSHIPS – DRIVING FORCES AND EFFECTS Dan Andersson Explain Logistics and Transport S ystems Departm of Managem and Economics ent ent Linköping University S-581 83 LINKÖPING, S weden Phone: +46 13 28 15 21 Fax: +46 13 28 25 13 E-mail: DanAn@eki.liu.s e ABSTRACT An increase in the outsourcing of logistics in partnerships between shippers and service providers has been observed. Expected positive cost and service effects Discuss are important driving forces for the outsourcing of logistics. Linked to the cost aspects is also a desire to reduce investments. It could be a question of transforming fixed costs to variable, or to facilitate fast and radical restructuring of supply chains. Finally, one of the single most important driving forces is the shipper's ambition to concentrate on core business. Logistics partnerships have been observed to have a positive effect on the following four areas at the shippers: cost, service, restructuring of supply chains, and control. The shippers believe that efficient operations, economies of scale and scope, and provider knowledge, have positive effects on costs and service. This Book by Bob AuBuchon on Flickr (CC-BY,NC,ND)
    • Research papers A good way to engage students 2 seminars Each group has 1 paper Present OUTSOURCING LOGISTICS IN PARTNERSHIPS – DRIVING FORCES AND EFFECTS Dan Andersson Explain Logistics and Transport S ystems Departm of Managem and Economics ent ent Linköping University S-581 83 LINKÖPING, S weden Phone: +46 13 28 15 21 Fax: +46 13 28 25 13 E-mail: DanAn@eki.liu.s e ABSTRACT An increase in the outsourcing of logistics in partnerships between shippers and service providers has been observed. Expected positive cost and service effects Discuss are important driving forces for the outsourcing of logistics. Linked to the cost aspects is also a desire to reduce investments. It could be a question of transforming fixed costs to variable, or to facilitate fast and radical restructuring of supply chains. Finally, one of the single most important driving forces is the shipper's ambition to concentrate on core business. Logistics partnerships have been observed to have a positive effect on the following four areas at the shippers: cost, service, restructuring of supply chains, and control. The shippers believe that efficient operations, economies of scale and scope, and provider knowledge, have positive effects on costs and service. Random presentations: Good! This Book by Bob AuBuchon on Flickr (CC-BY,NC,ND) Keeps course content current A good way to include research in the course Next: The Midterm tests
    • The midterm tests - goals Ensure understan ding Reflection ink Th ouble D loop Sc n’ - do le lab a ess gu t Low wor kloa for d me nesty Ho Quick feedback
    • The midterm tests Week 4 an d 6 (of 7) in the Again week exam Mean Squ ared Error (MSE ) grading 24 questions nd 1 :0a Two a tives terna l
    • Mean Squared Error A statistical risk function where an estimator (=the student) is tested. 1 0,9 Risky behaviour does not pay Error^2 0,8 0,7 0,6 0,5 For each question, the error (between 0 and 1) is squared 0,4 0,3 0,2 0,1 0 0 0,1 0,2 0,3 0,4 0,5 0,6 0,7 0,8 0,9 Error 1 The mean of all the errors form the Mean Squared Error - MSE
    • Usage of results MSE Student 1 0 0 0,6 0,12 Student 2 1 1 1 1 Student 3 0 0,8 0,4 0,27 0,33 0,55 0,51 MSE Rank 3 1 2 M re y s result Their Question 1 Question 2 Question 3 lts su
    • Feedback films Second loop Statistics Answers
    • The midterm tests - reflections Easy to grade Better than exams I get to know what they don’t know …and what they think they know but don’t Two or even three loops Seems to work… Scalable Next: The Case
    • The case - Background Fake company: Apelsin AB Makes computers I am CEO Rich backstory End result: A solutions pitch + a short report Needs help in planning future distribution system
    • The case - Data Real data + fake data Missing data Obscure data Meetings with CEO (4x15 minutes) Open-ended (very frustrating) Faulty data Software Proxio Optimizer
    • The case - methods used Closed meetings Filmed presentations Recording of CEO meetings Structured grading (except final presentation) Random presenters
    • The case - reflections Resembles reality A lot of work for the students Very fun! And difficult… Frustrating with open-ended tasks Next: Course evaluation
    • Course evaluation MSE: Keep! (85%) Films: Keep! (82%) Research papers: Keep! (73%) Case: Difficult with openended tasks. Frustrating. A lot of work. Software: Remove! Random presenters: Keep! (84%)
    • Beware, test-takers! Real work ahead. ! Per Olof Arnäs Technology Management and Economics per-olof.arnas@chalmers.se slides on slideshare.net/poar …or: ”How I inherited a course and changed almost everything.” New Science Lecture Theatre at UCT by Ian Barbour on Flickr (CC-BY,SA)