Virtual Humans in Cultural Heritage
Patrick Salamin, Mireille Clavien, Frédéric Vexo, Daniel Thalmann




                ...
2


Outline
• Introduction
• The avatars in Cultural Heritage
   –   Creation of an avatar
   –   Crowds: requirements and...
3


Introduction
• Motivation:
• Adding believable characters to virtual
  reconstructions allows non-experts a better
  e...
4


Contributions
• Adding variety
   – Texture and animation
• Providing tools for crowd setting up
   – Brushes
• Automa...
5


Avatar creation
• 3DS Max exporting
  – Pipe-line for converting character and animation data
    to format usable by ...
6


Avatar creation
• Textures design
  - Optimize texture mapping: only one material for
    each mesh
     - => all visu...
7


Avatar creation
• Deformations design
  – Adapt skeleton and deformation boxes to each mesh




  – Adjust deformation...
8


Avatar variety 1
• Textures design
  – Use same texture mapping for different meshes
  – Generate many different chara...
9


Avatar variety 2
• Each template has various sets of animation
  corresponding to specific emotional states
10


Avatar variety 3
• Variety of walking animations is ensured in realtime
  by slight rotation shifting on spine and ar...
11


Crowd: requirements & constraints
• Technical challenges: increased demand on
  computational resources
  –   Multi-a...
12


Behavior
• Virtual human agent
  – 3D graphic body representation
  – able to perform low-level actions
    (walking ...
13


Behavior
           • Virtual human agent
             – Has set of higher level complex
               behaviors (wa...
14


      Behavior – spray paradigm
      • Brushes
            – Tools with visual representation on the screen
        ...
15


Behavior – manual and automatic
16


Walking – procedural modeling
• Virtual Cultural Heritage
   – Main focus on reconstruction of major monuments
   – B...
17


Walking – navigation graph
•   Vertices = walkable space
•   Edges = Gates
•   Navigation Flow = Set of Paths
•   [Pe...
18


Walking – navigation graph
• Rendered geometry
19


Walking – navigation graph
• Geometry semantics
20


Walking – roman crowd behavior
21


Walking – shops
22


Walking – bakeries
23


Walking – bakeries/shops result
24


Walking – look at
25


Walking – stop look at
26


Walking – look at results
27


Walking – final navigation graph
• Navigation graphs automatically generated
  depending on the environment geometry ...
28


Walking - results
29


Smart environment
• Virtual character reacts differently depending on
  the environment
• Smart object: both avatar a...
30


Thanks for your attention!
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Virtual Humans in Cultural Heritage

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Virtual Humans in Cultural Heritage presentation at VSMM09 Workshop on 3D Knowledge Technologies for Cultural Heritage Applications.

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Virtual Humans in Cultural Heritage

  1. 1. Virtual Humans in Cultural Heritage Patrick Salamin, Mireille Clavien, Frédéric Vexo, Daniel Thalmann Patrick Salamin, Ph. D. student VRLab/EPFL, Switzerland
  2. 2. 2 Outline • Introduction • The avatars in Cultural Heritage – Creation of an avatar – Crowds: requirements and constraints – Avatars behavior – Navigation graphs – Creation of a smart environment • Conclusion
  3. 3. 3 Introduction • Motivation: • Adding believable characters to virtual reconstructions allows non-experts a better emotional involvement in a virtual reality scene. • Examples based on european projects: Erato, Cahrisma, Epoch, Pompeii
  4. 4. 4 Contributions • Adding variety – Texture and animation • Providing tools for crowd setting up – Brushes • Automatic navigation graphs • Interaction with semantic environments
  5. 5. 5 Avatar creation • 3DS Max exporting – Pipe-line for converting character and animation data to format usable by crowd rendering and animation engine – Exported data: • Mesh • Texture • UV coordinates • Skeleton hierarchy • Deformations bindings • Animations
  6. 6. 6 Avatar creation • Textures design - Optimize texture mapping: only one material for each mesh - => all visual elements (clothes, skin, face) are mixed in one single texture – Reduce texture size max 512x512 pixels
  7. 7. 7 Avatar creation • Deformations design – Adapt skeleton and deformation boxes to each mesh – Adjust deformations parameters – Key-postures to test deformations
  8. 8. 8 Avatar variety 1 • Textures design – Use same texture mapping for different meshes – Generate many different characters by varying colours 7 templates and 15 textures create an infinite variety of virtual romans
  9. 9. 9 Avatar variety 2 • Each template has various sets of animation corresponding to specific emotional states
  10. 10. 10 Avatar variety 3 • Variety of walking animations is ensured in realtime by slight rotation shifting on spine and arms joints Roman social classes are differentiated through clothes colors and walking style (spine bending)
  11. 11. 11 Crowd: requirements & constraints • Technical challenges: increased demand on computational resources – Multi-agent: large number of agents – Collision avoidance – Agent-agent interactions – Interaction with environment – Interaction with users – Different from single agent simulations – Conceptual differences: need for variety
  12. 12. 12 Behavior • Virtual human agent – 3D graphic body representation – able to perform low-level actions (walking with different gaits, playing animations of gestures, postures, speak, etc.) – Has set of internal attributes corresponding to various psychological, physical or scenario states (mobility, role, body size, etc.)
  13. 13. 13 Behavior • Virtual human agent – Has set of higher level complex behaviors (wander, follow-path, script, etc.) – Has set of rules determining selection of these behaviors – Able to receive events from: • Environment • Other agents • User interface
  14. 14. 14 Behavior – spray paradigm • Brushes – Tools with visual representation on the screen – Affect crowd members in different manners: • Create new individuals in the scene • Change their appearances or behaviors Negative Plebeians Patricians Neutral Deletion brush Creation brush Nobles Positive
  15. 15. 15 Behavior – manual and automatic
  16. 16. 16 Walking – procedural modeling • Virtual Cultural Heritage – Main focus on reconstruction of major monuments – But: complete site models are needed for authentic simulations. • Provide environment models at moderate cost. • Procedural models contain semantic information inherently (e.g. construction history) • Credits: – S. Haegler, P. Mueller, and Prof. L.v.Gool at Computer Vision Lab, ETH Zurich Müller, Vereenooghe, Vergauwen, Van Gool, Waelkens The Antonine Nymphaeum at Sagalassos, 2004
  17. 17. 17 Walking – navigation graph • Vertices = walkable space • Edges = Gates • Navigation Flow = Set of Paths • [Pettré et al. 06,07]
  18. 18. 18 Walking – navigation graph • Rendered geometry
  19. 19. 19 Walking – navigation graph • Geometry semantics
  20. 20. 20 Walking – roman crowd behavior
  21. 21. 21 Walking – shops
  22. 22. 22 Walking – bakeries
  23. 23. 23 Walking – bakeries/shops result
  24. 24. 24 Walking – look at
  25. 25. 25 Walking – stop look at
  26. 26. 26 Walking – look at results
  27. 27. 27 Walking – final navigation graph • Navigation graphs automatically generated depending on the environment geometry [Pettré et al. 06,07]
  28. 28. 28 Walking - results
  29. 29. 29 Smart environment • Virtual character reacts differently depending on the environment • Smart object: both avatar and object interact in the animation
  30. 30. 30 Thanks for your attention!

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