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Physical internet manifesto 1.10 2011 06-28 english bm Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Physical  Internet  Manifesto       Transforming  the  way  physical  objects   are  handled,  moved,  stored,  realized,  supplied  and  used,  aiming  towards  global  logisHcs  efficiency  and  sustainability   Professor  Benoit  Montreuil     Canada  Research  Chair  in  Enterprise  Engineering   CIRRELT  Interuniversity  Research  Center   on  Enterprise  Networks,  Logis<cs  and  Transporta<on   Laval  University,  Québec,  Canada     Version  1.10:  2011-­‐06-­‐28   Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 1/51  
  • 2. Acknowledgements   The  Physical  Internet  Manifesto  has  greatly  benefited  from   the  contribuHon  of  esteemed  colleagues  America   ü CIRRELT  Research  Center:   •  Teodor  Crainic  -­‐    UQAM   •  Michel  Gendreau  -­‐  Université  de  Montréal   •  Olivier  Labarthe,  Mustapha  Lounès  &  Jacques  Renaud  -­‐  Université  Laval   ü CICMHE,  College-­‐Industry  Council  for  Material  Handling  EducaHon:   •  Russ  Meller  –  University  of  Arkansas   •  Kevin  Gue  &  Jeff  Smith  –  Auburn  University   •  Kimberley  Ellis  –  Virginia  Tech   •  Leon  McGinnis  –  Georgia  Tech   •  Mike  Ogle  –  MHIA  Europe   •  Éric  Ballot,  Frédéric  Fontane  –  Mines  ParisTech   •  Rémy  Glardon  –  EPFL   •  Rene  De  Koster  –  Erasmus  University   •  Detlef  Spee  –  Fraunhofer  Ins<tute  for  Material  Flow  and  Logis<c   Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 2/51  
  • 3. Macroscopic  PosiHoning   CLAIM   The  way  physical  objects  are   moved,  handled,  stored,  realized,  supplied  and  used   throughout  the  world   is  neither  efficient  nor  sustainable   economically,  environmentally  and  socially   GOAL   Enabling  the  global  efficiency  and  sustainability  of  physical  object  movement,  handling,  storage,  realiza<on,  supply  &  usage   VISION   Evolving  towards  a  worldwide  Physical  Internet     Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 3/51  
  • 4. Inspiration for the Physical Internet Vision •  A great front page one-liner –  Interesting yet mainstream supply chain articles –  Nothing like what I perceived a Physical Internet should be •  I rapidly got passionate about the question What should or could be a full blown Physical Internet? –  What would be its key features? –  What capabilities would it offer that are not achievable today? •  Another question surfaced rapidly: Why would we need a Physical Internet? Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 4/51  
  • 5. Why Do we need a Physical Internet ?Logistics inefficiency and unsustainability claim The way physical objects are moved, handled, stored, realized, supplied and used throughout the world is inefficient and unsustainable economically, environmentally and socially Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 5/51  
  • 6. Why do we need to change ? LogisHcs  inefficiency  and  unsustainability   ECONOMIC   LogisHcs:  10-­‐20%  burden  on  GDP  of  most  countries   The  worldwide  logisHcs  cost  grows  faster  than  world  trade   ENVIRONMENT    One  of  the  heaviest  polluters,  energy  consumer  and  greenhouse  gas  generators   Growing  negaHve  contribuHon  while  naHons’  goals  aims  for  heavy  reducHons   SOCIAL   Lack  of  fast,  reliable  and  affordable  accessibility  and  mobility   of  physical  objects  for  the  vast  majority  of  the  world’s  populaHon   Too  ocen  precarious  logisHc  work  condiHons   Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 6/51  
  • 7. Inefficiency and unsustainability symptoms Leading Us Toward Hitting the Wall Real Hard 1.  We are shipping air and packaging 2.  Empty travel is the norm rather than the exception 3.  Truckers have become the modern cowboys 4.  Products mostly sit idle, stored where unneeded, yet so often unavailable fast where needed 5.  Production and storage facilities are poorly used 6.  So many products are never sold, never used 7.  Products do not reach those who need them the most 8.  Products unnecessarily move, crisscrossing the world 9.  Fast & reliable multimodal transport is a dream or a joke 10.  Getting products in and out of cities is a nightmare 11.  Networks are neither secure nor robust 12.  Smart automation & technology are hard to justify 13.  Innovation is strangledMontreuil B. (2011) Towards a Physical Internet: Meeting the Global Logistics Sustainability Grand Challenge, Logistics Research,currently available as online publication, 2011-02-12, http://www.springerlink.com/content/g362448hw8586774/fulltext.pdf Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 7/51  
  • 8. Logistics inefficiency and unsustainability symptoms Leading Us Toward Hitting the Wall Real Hard 1.  We are shipping air and packaging –  Trucks and containers are often half empty at departure, with a large chunk of the non-emptiness being filled by packaging 2.  Empty travel is the norm rather than the exception –  Vehicles and containers often return empty, or travel extra routes to find return shipments –  Loaded vehicles get emptier and emptier as their route unfolds from delivery point to delivery point 3.  Truckers have become the modern cowboys –  So many are always on the road, so often away from home for long durations –  Their family and social life is precarious, as well as their personal health –  In general, logistic operators and material handling personnel have similar precarious positions Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 8/51  
  • 9. Logistics inefficiency and unsustainability symptoms Leading Us Toward Hitting the Wall Real Hard 4.  Products mostly sit idle, stored where unneeded, yet so often unavailable fast where needed –  Manufacturers, distributors, retailers and users are all storing products, often in vast quantities through their networks of warehouses and distribution centers, yet service levels and response times to local users are constraining and unreliable 5.  Production and storage facilities are poorly or badly used –  Most businesses invest in storage and/or production facilities which are lowly used most of the times, or yet badly used, dealing with products which would better be dealt elsewhere, forcing a lot of unnecessary travel Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 9/51  
  • 10. Logistics inefficiency and unsustainability symptoms Leading Us Toward Hitting the Wall Real Hard 6.  So many products are never sold, never used –  A significant portion of consumer products that are made never reach the right market on time, ending up unsold and unused while there would have been RusHng  new  cars  in  disused  airfield   required elsewhere 7.  Products do not reach those who need them the most –  This is specially true in less developed countries and disaster-crisis zones Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 10/51  
  • 11. Logistics inefficiency and unsustainability symptoms Leading Us Toward Hitting the Wall Real Hard 8.  Products unnecessarily move, crisscrossing the world –  Products commonly travel thousands of miles-kilometers which could have been avoided by making or assembling it much nearer to point of use 9.  Fast & reliable multimodal transport is a dream or a joke –  Even though there are great examples, in general synchronization is so poor, interfaces so badly designed, that multimodal routes are most often time and cost inefficient and risky Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 11/51  
  • 12. Logistics inefficiency and unsustainability symptoms Leading Us Toward Hitting the Wall Real Hard 10.  Getting products in and out of cities is a nightmare –  Most cities are not designed and equipped for easing freight transportation, handling and storage, making the feeding of businesses and users in cities a nightmare 11.  Networks are neither secure nor robust –  There is extreme concentration of operations in a limited number of centralized production and distribution facilities, with travel along a narrow set of high-traffic route –  This makes the logistic networks and supply chains of so many businesses, unsecure in face of robbery and terrorism acts, and not robust in face of natural disasters and demand crises Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 12/51  
  • 13. Logistics inefficiency and unsustainability symptoms Leading Us Toward Hitting the Wall Real Hard 12.  Smart automation & technology are hard to justify – Vehicles, handling systems and operational facilities have to deal with so many types of materials, shapes and unit loads, with each player independently and locally deciding on his piece of the pie – Hard to justify smart connective (e.g. RFID) technologies, systemic handling and transport automation, as well as smart collaborative piloting software 13.  Innovation is strangled – Innovation is bottlenecked by lack of generic standards & protocols, transparency, modularity and systemic open infrastructure – This makes breakthrough innovation so tough, justifying a focus on marginal epsilon innovation Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 13/51  
  • 14. Mapping  inefficiency  &  unsustainability  symptoms     to  economical,  environmental  and  societal  facets   !$)&*#$%+$,( !"#$#%&"( O$1<1,&$=&(&,8018%3,#%1 -#"&+,( . /+0*+012&33&$40&*0$503"64&$4 7 !%3,80,*)+(0&10,2+0$#*%0*,2+*0,2$0,2+0+9"+3,&#$ : ;*<"6+*102)+0=+"#%+0,2+0%#5+*$0"#>=#81 @*#5<",10%#1,(801&,0&5(+A01,#*+50>2+*+0<$$++5+5A08+,01#0#B,+$0 ? <$)&(=(+0B1,0>2+*+0$++5+5 C @*#5<",&#$0$501,#*4+0B"&(&,&+10*+03##*(80<1+5 D -#0%$803*#5<",10*+0$+)+*01#(5A0$+)+*0<1+5 E @*#5<",105#0$#,0*+"20,2#1+0>2#0$++50,2+%0,2+0%#1, F @*#5<",10<$$+"+11*&(80%#)+A0"*&11"*#11&$40,2+0>#*(5 G H1,0I0*+(&=(+0&$,+*%#5(0,*$13#*,0&101,&((005*+%0#*00J#6+ .K L+,,&$403*#5<",10&$0$50#<,0#B0"&,&+10&100$&42,%*+ .. M+,>#*610*+0$+&,2+*01+"<*+0$#*0*#=<1, .7 -%*,0<,#%,&#$0I0,+"2$#(#480*+02*50,#0J<1,&B8 .: N$$#),&#$0&101,*$4(+5 Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 14/51  
  • 15. Eliciting the Overall Goal Toward Global Logistics Efficiency and Sustainability Environmental goal Sustainably reduce by an order of magnitude the logistics-induced global greenhouse gas emission, energy consumption and pollution Economic goal Sustainably reduce by an order of magnitude the global economic burden of logistics while unlocking huge gains in business productivity Societal goal Sustainably and significantly increase the quality of life of the logistics workers and the world’s population by improving the timely accessibility and mobility of physical objectsNote: Logistics is hereafter used in its broad sense notably including transportation, handling, storage, supply, realization (production, assembly, finishing, personalizing, recycling) and usage Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 15/51  
  • 16. The  Digital  Internet   ExploiHng  the  InformaHon  Highway  Metaphor  Decades  ago  the  informaHon  &  communicaHons  technology  community   was  stuck  in  a  huge  inefficient  and  unsustainable  tangle   due  to  millions  of  unconnected  computers   When  looking  for  a  way   to  conceptualize  how  it  should  transform  itself,   it  relied  on  a  physical  transport  and  logisHcs  metaphor:   Building  the  informaHon  highway   Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 16/51  
  • 17. The  Digital  Internet  Expanding  Beyond  the  InformaHon  Highway  Metaphor   They  have  achieved  their  goal  and  went  farther,   reshaping  completely  the  way   digital  compuHng  and  communicaHon  are  now  performed   They  have  invented  the  Internet,  leading  the  way  to  the  World-­‐Wide  Web   They  have  enabled  the  building  of   an  open  distributed  networked  infrastructure   that  is  currently  revoluHonizing   so  many  facets  of  our  societal  and  economic  reality   Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 17/51  
  • 18. The Essence of the Digital Internet The  Digital  Internet  is  about   the  interconnecHon  between  networks   in  a  way  transparent  for  the  user,   so  allowing  the  transmission  of   formafed  data  packets   in  a  standard  way   permigng  them  to  transit  through   heterogeneous  equipment   respecHng  the  TCP/IP  protocol  References:    Kurose  J.,  Ross  K.  and  Wesley  A.  “Computer  Networking:  A  Top  Down  Approach  Featuring  the  Internet”,  3rd  edi<on.,  July  2004.    Parziale  L.,  Bri]  D.T.,  Davis  C.,  Forrester  J.,  Liu  W.,  Ma]hews  C.  and  Rosselot  N.  “TCP-­‐IP  Tutorial  and  Technical  Overview”,    2006.  h]p://www.redbooks.ibm.com/redbooks/pdfs/gg243376.pdf    “Interconnec<on  of  access  networks,  MANs  and  WANs  “,  h]p://images.google.ca/imgres?imgurl=h]p://www.exfo.com/     Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 18/51  
  • 19. How do we propose to meet the Logistics Grand Challenge ? The  Physical  Internet  IniHaHve   Using  the  Digital  Internet  as  a  Metaphor  for  the  Physical  World   Even  though  there  are  fundamental  differences   between  the  physical  world  and  the  informaHon  world,   the  Physical  Internet  iniHaHve     aims  to  exploit  the  Internet  metaphor   so  as  to  propose  a  vision  for   a  sustainable  and  progressively  deployable   breakthrough  soluHon   to  global  problems  associated  with  the  way   we  move,  handle,  store,  realize,  supply  and  use   physical  objects  all  around  the  world  Montreuil B. (2011) Towards a Physical Internet: Meeting the Global Logistics Sustainability Grand Challenge, Logistics Research,currently available as online publication, 2011-02-12, http://www.springerlink.com/content/g362448hw8586774/fulltext.pdf Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 19/51  
  • 20. Exposing  Key  Features   of  the  Physical  Internet  Vision  Evolving  towards  a  worldwide  Physical  Internet     Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 20/51  
  • 21. What is the Physical Internet? An open global logistics system leveraging mobility & supply network interconnectivity enabled by a standard set of collaborative protocols, modular containers and smart interfaces for increased efficiency and sustainability Physical Internet: PI, πCurrent version of a working definition for the Physical Internet, jointly developed by Benoit Montreuil, Eric Ballot and Russ Meller Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 21/51  
  • 22. Positioning the Physical Internet World  Wide  Web  (WWW)   Digital  Internet   Digital  informaHon  Packets     Smart  Grid   ConnecHng  Physical  objects  through  WWW   Energy   Internet  of  Things   Internet   Smart  Networked  Objects     Energy  Packets   Open  Supply  Web   Physical  Internet   Smart  Physical  Packets  Original  schema<cs  from  Benoit  Montreuil,  2010,  Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  www.physicalinterne<ni<a<ve.org   Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 22/51  
  • 23. Key Features of the Physical Internet Vision 1.  Aim  toward  universal  interconnecHvity   2.  Aim  for  a  unified  mulH-­‐scale  conceptual  framework   3.  Aim  for  webbed  reliability  and  resilience  of  networks   4.  Encapsulate  merchandises  in  world-­‐standard  green  modular  containers   5.  Evolve  from  material  to  container  handling  &  storage  systems   6.  Exploit  smart  networked  containers  embedding  smart  objects   7.  AcHvate  and  exploit  an  open  global  mobility  web   8.  AcHvate  and  exploit  an  open  global  supply  web   9.  Deploy  capability  cerHficaHons  and  open  performance  monitoring   10.  Design  products  figng  containers  with  minimal  space  waste   11.  Minimize  physical  moves  and  storages  by  digitally  transmigng  knowledge   and  materializing  products  as  locally  as  possible   12.  SHmulate  business  model  innovaHon   13.  Enable  open  infrastructural  innovaHon  Montreuil B. (2011) Towards a Physical Internet: Meeting the Global Logistics Sustainability Grand Challenge, Logistics Research,currently available as online publication, 2011-02-12, http://www.springerlink.com/content/g362448hw8586774/fulltext.pdf Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 23/51  
  • 24. What are the design aims of the Physical Internet? 1.  Aim  toward  universal  interconnecHvity   High-­‐performance  logisHc  centers,  movers  and  systems,     making  it  fast,  cheap,  easy  and  reliable   to  interconnect  physical  objects   through  modes  and  routes,  with  an  overarching  aim  toward  universal  interconnecHvity   Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 24/51  
  • 25. What are the design aims of the Physical Internet? 2.  Aim  for  a  unified  mulH-­‐scale  conceptual  framework   Intra-­‐Center  Inter-­‐Processor  Network   Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 25/51  
  • 26. What are the design aims of the Physical Internet? 2.  Aim  for  a  unified  mulH-­‐scale  conceptual  framework   Intra-­‐Facility  Inter-­‐Center  Network   Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 26/51  
  • 27. What are the design aims of the Physical Internet? 2.  Aim  for  a  unified  mulH-­‐scale  conceptual  framework   Intra-­‐Site  Inter-­‐Facility  Network   Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 27/51  
  • 28. What are the design aims of the Physical Internet? 2.  Aim  for  a  unified  mulH-­‐scale  conceptual  framework   Intra-­‐City   π-­‐transits  &  π-­‐hubs   Inter-­‐Site   Network   Toward π-enabled! sustainable! city logistics! Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 28/51  
  • 29. What are the design aims of the Physical Internet? 2.  Aim  for  a  unified  mulH-­‐scale  conceptual  framework   Québec,  Canada   Intra-­‐State   π-­‐transits  &  π-­‐hubs   Inter-­‐City   Network   North  eastern  states,   U.S.A.   Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 29/51  
  • 30. What are the design aims of the Physical Internet? 2.  Aim  for  a  unified  mulH-­‐scale  conceptual  framework   Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 30/51  
  • 31. What are the design aims of the Physical Internet? 3.  Aim  for  webbed  reliability  and  resilience   The  overall  Physical  Internet  network  of  networks   should  warrant  its  own  reliability   and  that  of  the  physical  objects  flowing  through  it   Network  webbing  and  the  mulHplicaHon  of  nodes   should  allow  the  Physical  Internet  to  insure  its  own  robustness  and   resilience  to  unforeseen  events   For  example,  if  a  node  or  a  part  of  a  network  fails,   the  traffic  should  be  easily  reroutable,     as  automaHcally  as  possible   Reference:  Peck  H.,  “Supply  chain  vulnerability,  risk  and  resilience”,  Chap.  14  in  Global  Logis<cs  New  Direc<ons  in  Supply  Chain  Management,  2007   Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 31/51  
  • 32. What are the design aims of the Physical Internet? 3.  Aim  for  webbed  reliability  and  resilience   The  Physical  Internet’s  actors,  movers,  routes,  nodes  and  flowing  containers  should  interact  in  synergy  to  guarantee:     –  The  integrity  of  physical  objects  encapsulated  in  π-­‐containers   –  The  physical  and  informaHonal  integrity   of  π-­‐containers,  π-­‐movers,  π-­‐routes  and  π-­‐nodes   –  The  informaHonal  integrity  of  π-­‐actors   (humans,  socware  agents)   –  The  robustness  of  client-­‐focused  performance  in  delivering  and   storing  π-­‐containers.     Reference:  Peck  H.,  “Supply  chain  vulnerability,  risk  and  resilience”,  Chap.  14  in  Global  Logis<cs  New  Direc<ons  in  Supply  Chain  Management,  2007   Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 32/51  
  • 33. What are the enabling constituents of the Physical Internet? 4.  Encapsulate  merchandises   in  world-­‐standard  green  modular  containers  •    Merchandise  is  uniHzed  as  content  of  a  π-­‐container  and   is  not  dealt  with  explicitly  by  the  Physical  Internet    •  Modular  dimensions  from  cargo  container  sizes  down  to  Hny  sizes  •  Conceived  to  be  easily  flowed  through  various   transport,  handling  and  storage  modes  and  means  •  Easy  to  handle,  store,  transport,  interlock,  load,  unload,  construct   and  dismantle,  compose  and  decompose  •  Environment  friendly  materials  with  minimal  off-­‐service  footprint  •  Smart  tag  enabled,  with  sensors    if  necessary,  to  allow  their  proper   idenHficaHon,  rouHng  and  maintaining  •  Various  usage-­‐adapted  structural  grades  •  CondiHoning  capabiliHes  (e.g.  temperature)  as  necessary  •  Sealable  for  security  purposes   Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 33/51  
  • 34. What are the enabling constituents of the Physical Internet? π-Containers modularized and standardized worldwide in terms of dimensions, functions and fixtures Y X Z Illustrative modular dimensions 0,12 m 0,24 m 0,36 m 0,48 m !"#$%&&(&)&*+& !"#$%&&(&)&*++& 0,6 m 1,2 m 2,4 m 3,6 m 4,8 m 6m 12 m !"#$%&&(&)&*,+& B. Montreuil, B. Gilbert Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 34/51  
  • 35. What are the enabling constituents of the Physical Internet? π-­‐Containers  designed  for  the Physical Internet Easy to load, unload, handle, store, transport, seal, snap, interlock, construct, dismantle, panel, compose and decompose ,$%&$()$*+ !"#$%&$()$*+Reference: Montreuil, B., R.D. Meller, E. Ballot (2010)Towards a physical internet: the impact on logistics facilities and material handling systems design and innovation,in Progress in Material Handling Research, Edited by K. Gue et al., Material Handling Industry of America, 23 p., 2010. Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 35/51  
  • 36. What are the enabling constituents of the Physical Internet? Key features of π-containers   Securable   Modular   Traceable,   Routable   Factor y   Snappable   Client s  (reta Easy-­‐to-­‐dismantle     il  shel ve s)   Reusable   Recyclable  Original  drawing  by  Eric  Ballot,  Mines  ParisTech,2011-­‐06-­‐27,  adapted  by  Benoit  Montreuil   Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 36/51 36    
  • 37. What are the enabling constituents of the Physical Internet? 5.  Evolve  from  material  to  π-­‐container   transport,  handling  &  storage  means  and  systems   π-container moving and storage means and systems, with innovative technologies and processes exploiting the characteristics of π-containers to enable their fast, cheap, easy and reliable input, storage, composing, decomposing, monitoring, protection and output through smart, sustainable and seamless automation and human handling Reference: Montreuil, B., R.D. Meller, E. Ballot (2010) Towards a physical internet: the impact on logistics facilities and material handling systems design and innovation, in Progress in Material Handling Research, Edited by K. Gue et al., Material Handling Industry of America, 23 p., 2010. Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 37/51  
  • 38. What are the enabling constituents of the Physical Internet? 5.  Evolve  from  material  to  π-­‐container   transport,  handling  &  storage  means  and  systems  F  π-­‐container  handling  and  storage  systems:   –  Enable  fast  and  reliable  input  and  output  performance   –  Have  seamless  interfacing  with  vehicles  and  systems   moving  products  in  and  out,  as  well  as  client  socware  systems  for   tracking  and  interfacing  with  the  containers   –  Monitor  and  protect  the  integrity  of  π-­‐containers   –  Secure  the  containers  to  the  desired  level   –  Provide  an  open  live  documentaHon  of  their  specified  performance  and   capabiliHes  and  of  their  demonstrated  performance  and  capabiliHes,   updated  through  ongoing  operaHons    F  This applies in currently-labeled distribution centers, crossdocking centers, train stations, multimodal hubs, seaports, airports, and so on Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 38/51  
  • 39. What are the enabling constituents of the Physical Internet? 6.  Exploit  smart  networked  containers   embedding  smart  objects   ExploiHng  as  best  as  possible   the  capabiliHes  of  smart  π-­‐containers   connected  to  the  Digital  Internet  and  the  World  Wide  Web,   and  of  their  embedded  smart  objects,   for  improving  performance  as  perceived  by  the  clients   and  overall  performance  of  the  Physical  Internet   Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 39/51  
  • 40. Physical Internet and the Internet of Things F  The  Internet  of  Things  is  about  enabling   ubiquitous  connecHon  with  physical  objects   equipped  with  smart  connecHve  technology   (RFID,  GPS,  Internet,  etc.),  making  the  objects   ever  smarter  and  enabling  distributed  self-­‐ control  of  objects  through  networks     F  The  Physical  Internet  is  to  exploit  as  best  as   possible  the  Internet  of  Things   to  enable  the  ubiquitous  connecHvity   of  its  π-­‐containers  and  π-­‐systems  Image: http://www.globetracker.biz/GlobeTracker/News.asp Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 40/51  
  • 41. What are the targets of the Physical Internet? 7. Enabling an open global mobility webFrom point-to-point hub-and-spoke transport to distributed multimodal transport Québec 20 Montréal 20-401 81 Alexandria Bay, US border 90 Syracuse 90 Buffalo 71 Cleveland 70 Columbus 70 Indianapolis 44 St-Louis 44 Springfield Current Proposed Tulsa P2P Distributed 44 Distance travelled one-way: 5030 km 5030 km 40 Oklahoma City Drivers: 1 17 40 Amarillo Trucks: 1 17 40 Albuquerque Trailer: 1 1 40 Flagstaff One-way driving time (h): 48 51+ 40 Needles Return driving time (h): 48+ 51+ Barstow Total time at transit points (h): 0 9 15-10 Total trailer trip time from Quebec to LA (h): 120 60+ Los Angeles Total trailer trip time from LA to Quebec (h): 120+ 60+ Total trailer round trip time (h): 240+ 120+ Multi-segment travel Average driving time per driver (h): 96+ 6 from Quebec to Los Angeles Average trip time per driver (h): 240+ 6,5 Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 41/51  
  • 42. What are the targets of the Physical Internet? 7. Enabling an open global mobility web Transporta<on  between  nodes  +  Handling  within  nodes  :  About  Moving  Objects   An  interconnected  set  of  open  unimodal  &  mul3modal  hubs,  transits  &  ports  Air  route   Road   Open  π-­‐Port  MariHme  route   Highway   Open  mulHmodal  π-­‐hub  &  π-­‐transit  zone   Railroad   Open  unimodal  π-­‐hub  &  π-­‐transit  zone   Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 42/51 42    
  • 43. ."$# -*# !"# -"# !$# 7. Enabling an open global .*# -# !%# mobility web -(# !&# ."%# -+# !# -)# !(# -%# !)# !*# .(# -&# !+# π-­‐Transit  sites   -$# !",# allowing  distributed   !"#$%&()*+,-" mulH-­‐segment  transport   !"#$%),,*+," through  the  Physical  Internet   !"#$.+/*%0+" !"#$1)2" Status of !-carriers currently in !-transit" Incoming deposit Outgoing pickup estimation !-carrier !-bay !-vehicle Time !-vehicle Time (min, mode, max) C1 B2 V1 04:35 V14 (06:04, 06:05, 06:15) C2 B10 V3 05:15 V15 (06:05, 06:09, 06:12) C3 B7 V4 05:20 V13 (06:04, 06:07, 06:10) C4 B9 V6 05:35 V11 (06:02, 06:02, 06:02) C5 B3 V8 05:45 V12 (06:01, 06:01, 06:01) C6 B4 V9 05:48 V16 (06:10, 06:12, 06:18) C7 B6 V11 05:55 V19 (06:15, 06:20, 06:30) C8 B1 V12 05:58 V18 (06:10, 06:15, 06:20) C9 B10 V13 06:00 V25 (06:20, 06:30, 06:45)Reference: Montreuil, B., R.D. Meller, E. Ballot (2010)Towards a physical internet: the impact on logistics facilities and material handling systems design and innovation,in Progress in Material Handling Research, Edited by K. Gue et al., Material Handling Industry of America, 23 p., 2010. Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 43/51  
  • 44. !"#$%& 7. Enabling an open global mobility web Road-­‐Water  π-­‐Hub   designed  for  enabling  distributed   mulH-­‐segment  intermodal   transport   of  π-­‐containers  through   the  Physical  Internet   (")&Reference: Montreuil, B., R.D. Meller, E. Ballot (2010)Towards a physical internet: the impact on logistics facilities and material handling systems design and innovation,in Progress in Material Handling Research, Edited by K. Gue et al., Material Handling Industry of America, 23 p., 2010. Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 44/51  
  • 45. What are the targets of the Physical Internet? 8.  AcHvate  and  exploit  an  Open  Global  Supply  Web   An  open  supply  web  composed  of  an  open  distribuHon  web   coupled  to  an  open  realizaHon  web   enabling  producers,  distributors  and  retailers   to  dynamically  deploy  their  π-­‐container-­‐embedded  products   in  mulHple  geographically  dispersed  centers,   realizing  and  deploying  them   for  fast,  efficient  and  reliable  response  delivery   to  distributed  stochasHc  demand   for  their  products,  services  and/or  soluHons   Enabling Physical Equivalents of! Intranets, Virtual Private Networks,! Cloud Computing and Cloud Storage!References:    Montreuil  B.,  Labarthe,  O.,  Hakimi,  D.,  Larcher,  A.,  &  Audet,  M.  Supply  Web  Mapper.  Proceedings  of  Industrial  Engineering  and  Systems  Management,  Conference,  IESM,  ,  Conference  Montréal,  Canada,  May  13-­‐15,  2009     Hakimi  D.,  B.  Montreuil,  O.  Labarthe,  “Supply  Web:  Concept  and  Technology”,  7th  Annual  Interna<onal  Symposium  on  Supply  Chain  Management,  Conference  Toronto,  Canada,  October  28-­‐30,  2009Montreuil,  B.,      Hakimi,  D.  ,  B.  Montreuil,  O.  Labarthe,    ”Supply  Web  Agent-­‐Based  Simula<on  Plakorm”  Proceedings  of  the  3rd  Interna<onal  Conference  on  Informa<on  Systems,  Logis<cs  and  Supply  Chain  Crea<ng  value  through  green   supply  chains,  ILS  2010  –  Casablanca  (Morocco),  April  14-­‐16<.   Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 45/51  
  • 46. What are the targets of the Physical Internet? Open  DistribuHon  Web   An  interconnected  set  of  open  warehouses  and  distribu3on  centers   Port   Road   Open  π-­‐Port   MariHme  route   Railroad   Open  π-­‐store  &  π-­‐distributor  zone   Air  route   Highway   Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 46/51 46    
  • 47. What are the targets of the Physical Internet? Activate and exploit an Open Global Distribution Web Most companies design, run and optimize independently their private distribution networks, investing in DCs or engaging in long-term leases or contracts There are 535 000 distribution centers in the U.S.A. only Most of them are used by a single company Most companies use less than 20 DCs Imagine the potential if each company could deploy its products through a open web including 535 000 open DCs in the USAReference: Montreuil and Sohrabi, From Private Supply Networks to Open Supply Webs, IERC 2010 Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 47/51  
  • 48. 1Factories: 4 3Firm dedicated DCs: 16Mean lead time: 1,75 2Max lead time: 3 4Independent Factory: 1 Factory: 1 Factory: 1 Factory: 1private Firm dedicated DCs: 4 Firm dedicated DCs: 4 Firm dedicated DCs: 4 Firm dedicated DCs: 4 Mean lead time: 1,73 Mean lead time: 1,78 Mean lead time: 1,75 Mean lead time: 1,73distribution Max lead time: 3 Max lead time: 3 Max lead time: 3 Max lead time: 3networksShared distribution web Shared distribution webwith independently with jointly 1 1implemented DCs 3 3 implemented DCs Factories: 4 Factories: 4 Firm dedicated DCs: 0 Firm dedicated DCs: 0 2 2 Group dedicated DCs: 16 Group dedicated DCs: 3 Mean lead time: 1,08 4 4 Mean lead time: 1,48 Max lead time: 3 Max lead time: 3 1 Factories: 4 3 Firm dedicated DCs: 0 Open distribution web Group dedicated DCs: 0 with a high density of open DCs Open DCs used: 60+ Mean lead time: 0 available to many other clients 2 4 Max lead time: 0* Lead times induced by transport from DC to client region Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 48/51  
  • 49. What are the targets of the Physical Internet? Open  RealizaHon  Web   An  interconnected  set  of  open  produc3on,  personaliza3on  &  retrofit  centers,   indeed  of  open  factories  of  any  type   Port   Road   Open  π-­‐factory  zone   MariHme  route   Railroad   Air  route   Highway   Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 49/51 49    
  • 50. What are the targets of the Physical Internet? Open  Supply  Web   The  union  of  open  distribu3on  web  &  open  realiza3on  web   Port   Road   Open  π-­‐Port   MariHme  route   Railroad   Open  π-­‐store  &  π-­‐distributor  zone   Air  route   Highway   Open  π-­‐factory  zone   Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 50/51 50    
  • 51. What are the targets of the Physical Internet? Open  Supply  Web   !"##$%&()*+,-&.& 9& + :& !"##$%& 3#(&4"##$%&*(1& ()*+,-&/& = (5#$+6)(7&1%&/&87&.& !"##$%& ;&vs 0(1& /2.&Source:  Ballot  E.,  O.  Guodet  &  B.  Montreuil  (2011),  Physical  Internet  enabled  open  hub  network  design  for  distributed  networked  opera<ons,  Proc.  of  SOHOMA  2011   Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 51/51  
  • 52. Shared supply web Shared supply webwith shared factories with shared factoriesand independently implemented shared DCs and jointly implemented shared DCs Firm dedicated factories: 0 Firm dedicated factories: 0 Group shared factories: 4 Group shared factories: 4 Firm dedicated DCs: 0 Firm dedicated DCs: 0 Group shared DCs: 16 Group shared DCs: 3 Mean DC-to-region lead time: 1,08 Mean DC-to-region lead time: 1,48 Max DC-to-region lead time: 3 Max DC-to-region lead time: 3 Mean factory-to-DC lead time: 1,11 Mean factory-to-DC lead time: 0,83 Max factory-to-DC lead time: 3 Max factory-to-DC lead time: 3 Firm dedicated factories: 0 Group shared factories: 4Open supply web Firm dedicated DCs: 0 Group shared DCs: 0with a high density of open DCs Open DCs used: 60+available to many other clients Mean DC-to-region lead time: 0 Max DC-to-region lead time: 0and shared factories Mean factory-to-DC lead time: 2among the four firms Max factory-to-DC lead time: 4 Firm dedicated factories: 0 Group shared factories: 0 Open factories used: 64+Open supply web Firm dedicated DCs: 0with a high density of Group dedicated DCs: 0open distribution and production centers Open DCs used: 64+ Mean DC-to-region lead time: 0available to many other clients Max DC-to-region lead time: 0 Mean factory-to-DC lead time: 0 Max factory-to-DC lead time: 0*  Inter-­‐region  transport  induced  lead  3mes   Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 52/51  
  • 53. What are the targets of the Physical Internet? Open  LogisHcs  Web   The  union  of  Open  Mobility  Web  and  Open  Supply  Web  Port   Air  route   Open  mulHmodal  π-­‐hub  &  π-­‐transit  zone  MariHme  route   Road   Open  unimodal  π-­‐hub  &  π-­‐transit  zone   Open  π-­‐Port  Highway   Railroad   Open  π-­‐store  &  π-­‐distributor  zone   Open  π-­‐factory  zone   Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 53/51 53    
  • 54. Open   RealizaHon   web   Open  Produc3on,   Personaliza3on  &   Retrofit  Centers     Open   Supply   Open   DistribuHon   Web   Open   web   LogisHcs   Open   Distribu3on  Centers   Web   &  Warehouses   Open   Mobility   Open   web     Open   Mobility  Unimodal  &  Mul3modal   Web   Hubs  &  Transits   Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 54/51  
  • 55. How can stakeholders help the Physical Internet thrive? 9.  Deploy  capability  cerHficaHons  and   open  performance  monitoring   Live open monitoring of really achieved performance of all PI certified actors and entities, on key performance indices on critical facets such as speed, service level, reliability, safety and security Such live performance tracking is openly available worldwide to enable fact-based decision making and stimulate continuous improvement Open information is to be provided in respect of confidentiality of specific transactions Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 55/51  
  • 56. How can stakeholders help the Physical Internet thrive? 9.  Deploy  capability  cerHficaHons  and   open  performance  monitoring   Multi-level Physical Internet capability certification of containers, handling systems, vehicles, information systems ports, distribution centers, roads, cities and regions, protocols and processes, and so on Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 56/51  
  • 57. How can stakeholders help the Physical Internet thrive? 10.  Design  products  figng  containers   with  minimal  space  waste   Products  designed  and  engineered   to  minimize  the  load  and  burden   they  generate  on  the  Physical  Internet,   with  their  dimensions  adapted   to  standard  container  dimensions,    with  maximal  volumetric  and  funcHonal  density   while  containerized     Reference:    Seliger  G.,  “Sustainability  in  Manufacturing  -­‐  Recovery  of  Resources  in  Product  and  Material  Cycles”  (Ed.  by  Günther  Seliger,  Sringer  Verlag,  2007   Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 57/51  
  • 58. How can stakeholders help the Physical Internet thrive? 10.  Design  products  figng  containers  with  minimal  space  waste  F  Product  dimensions  adapted  to  the  standard  container  dimensions   –  So  that  the  packaged  product  fits  in  a  small  footprint  container  F  In  order  to  avoid  moving  and  storing  air,  products  should  be  designed  and   engineered  so  as  to  have  maximal  volumetric  density  while  being  in   Physical  Internet  containers,  extendable  to  their  usage  dimensions  when   necessary  F  Products  should  be  designed  so  that  only  key  components  and  modules   have  to  travel  extensively  through  the  Physical  Internet:   –  Easy  to  be  completed  near  point  of  use  using  locally  available  objects  F  Products  having  to  move  through  the  Physical  Internet  should  be  as   funcHonally  dense  as  possible  when  in  the  containers   –  FuncHonal  density  of  an  object  can  be  expressed  as  the  raHo  of  its  useful   funcHonality  over  the  product  of  its  weight  and  volume   Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 58/51  
  • 59. How can stakeholders help the Physical Internet thrive? 11.  Minimize  physical  moves  and  storages   by  digitally  transmigng  knowledge   and  materializing  products  as  locally  as  possible   through  the  open  realizaHon  web   Exploiting extensively the knowledge-based dematerialization of products and their materialization in physical objects at point of use As it will gain maturity, the Physical Internet is expected to be connected toever more open distributed flexible production centers capable of locally realizing (make, assemble, finish) for clients a wide variety of products from digitally transmitted specifications, local physical objects and, if needed, critical physical objects brought in from faraway sources Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 59/51  
  • 60. How are business and the Physical Internet synergizing each other? 12. Stimulate business model innovation Innovative business models for commercializing Physical Internet enabled offers by various parties, including revenue models for the various actors What are to be the π-enabled equivalents of Amazon, eBay and Google? How are the manufacturers, distributers, retailers, transporters, logistics providers and solutions providersgoing to evolve so as to best exploit the Physical Internet? Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 60/51  
  • 61. How are business and the Physical Internet synergizing each other? 12. Stimulate business model innovation RemuneraHng  the  Players  F In  the  Digital  Internet,  the  transmission  of  informaHon   is  remunerated  mostly  through  bundled  flat  fees   due  to  the  quasi  nil  marginal  costs  F In  the  Physical  Internet,  the  transmission  of  a  container   generates  non  negligible  costs  for  each  of  the  operators   having  taken  charge  of  some  part  of  the  transmission  F It  is  thus  necessary  to  define  business  models  for   commercializing  offers  as  well  as  operator  revenue  models   –  There  currently  exist  examples  paving  the  way  to  realize  this,  notably  in  the   airline  industry     Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 61/51  
  • 62. How are infrastructures and the Physical Internet synergizing each other?13. Enable Open Infrastructural Innovation Systemic  coherence  and  means  interoperability   must  enable  the  transparent  usage  of   heavy  handling,  storage  and  transport  means   currently  exisHng  or  to  come  in  the  future,   that  are  currently  so  hard  to  use,   reducing  their  potenHal  posiHve  environmental  impact   The  Physical  Internet  homogeneity  in  terms  of   container  modules  encapsulaHng  objects   should  allow  a  much  befer  uHlizaHon  of  means,   thus  increasing  the  capacity  of  infrastructures   by  the  exploitaHon  of   standardizaHons,  raHonalizaHons  and  automaHons   through  currently  unreachable  innovaHons   Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 62/51  
  • 63. FoodTubes  and  CargoCap:  Examples  of  currently  contemplated   infrastructural  iniHaHves  in  line  with  the  Physical  Internet   h]p://www.ilookforwardto.com/2010/12/foodtubes-­‐really-­‐fast-­‐food-­‐delivered-­‐in-­‐a-­‐physical-­‐Internet-­‐of-­‐underground-­‐pipes.html   h]p://www.cargocap.com/content/what-­‐is-­‐cargocap      h]p://www.cargocap.com/content/what-­‐is-­‐cargocap   CIRRELT,  Université  L1.10     Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version   Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,   aval   2011-06-28, 63/51  
  • 64. Key Features of the Physical Internet Vision 1.  Aim  toward  universal  interconnecHvity   2.  Aim  for  a  unified  mulH-­‐scale  conceptual  framework   3.  Aim  for  webbed  reliability  and  resilience  of  networks   4.  Encapsulate  merchandises  in  world-­‐standard  green  modular  containers   5.  Evolve  from  material  to  container  handling  &  storage  systems   6.  Exploit  smart  networked  containers  embedding  smart  objects   7.  AcHvate  and  exploit  an  open  global  mobility  web   8.  AcHvate  and  exploit  an  open  global  supply  web   9.  Deploy  capability  cerHficaHons  and  open  performance  monitoring   10.  Design  products  figng  containers  with  minimal  space  waste   11.  Minimize  physical  moves  and  storages  by  digitally  transmigng  knowledge   and  materializing  products  as  locally  as  possible   12.  SHmulate  business  model  innovaHon   13.  Enable  open  infrastructural  innovaHon  Montreuil B. (2011) Towards a Physical Internet: Meeting the Global Logistics Sustainability Grand Challenge, Logistics Research,currently available as online publication, 2011-02-12, http://www.springerlink.com/content/g362448hw8586774/fulltext.pdf Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 64/51  
  • 65. Physical  Internet  addressing  logisHcs  inefficiency  and  unsustainability  symptoms   ?86/%*-(C)&$2)$&(78*2*%&$2/&/% ! " # $ % & ( ) !* !! !" !# A$""$.(2$-/*"/-/&6(*).(2$/-/$)%$(1>( !+$)(+$2>123*)%$(31)/&12/)9(*).( ?21.,%&(.$/9)(>12(%1)&*/)$2/@*&/1) ?21.,%&(3*&$2/*-/@*&/1)()$*2(&1( 71)&*/)$2(8*).-/)9(*).(&12*9$( !+$)(/)>2*&2,%&,2*-(/))15*&/1) !"#$%&($)%*+,-*&$.(/)(012-.( 4)/>/$.(3,-&/=&/$2(%1)%$+&,*-( :3*2&()$&012;$.(%1)&*/)$2( &*).*2.(31.,-*2(%1)&*/)$2 </&2/",&$.(3,-&/=$93$)&( B,/)$(31.$-(/))15*&/1) 4)/5$2*-(/)&$2%1))$%&/5/&6 $3"$../)9(3*2&(1"#$%& !+$)(9-1"*-(,++-6(0$" %*+*"/-/&6(%$2&/>/%*&/1) /)&$231.*-(&2*)+12& +1/)&(1>(,$ >2*3$012; 4),&*/)*"/-/&6(63+&13 )$&012; 6&$3 "#$%&#$()**)+,$%)&$ ! %+-$*%./%,)+, 12*34$3&%5#6$)$3(#$ 0 +7&2$&%3(#&$3(%+$3(#$ #8.#*3)7+ :&;./#&$(%5#$<#.72#$ 9 3(#$27-#&+$.7=<74 ?&7-;.3$27364$)3$ )-6#@$37&#-$=(#&#$ > ;++##-#-@$4#3$7$7A3#+$ ;+%5%)6%<6#$A%3$=(#&#$ +##-#- ?&7-;.3)7+$%+-$37&%,#$ B A%.)6)3)#$%&#$*77&64$ ;#- D7$2%+4$*&7-;.3$%&#$ C +#5#&$76-@$+#5#&$;#- ?&7-;.3$-7$+73$&#%.($ E 3(7#$=(7$+##-$3(#2$ 3(#$273 ?&7-;.3$;++#.#%&)64$ F 275#@$.&).&7)+,$3(#$ =7&6- H%3$I$&#6)%<6#$ G )+3#&27-%6$3&%+*7&3$)$ 3)66$%$-&#%2$7&$%$J7/# L#33)+,$*&7-;.3$)+$%+-$ !K 7;3$7A$.)3)#$)$%$ +),(32%&# M#3=7&/$%&#$+#)3(#&$ !! #.;&#$+7&$&7<;3 D2%&3$%;372%3)7+$I$ !0 3#.(+767,4$%&#$(%&-$37$ J;3)A4 !9 N++75%3)7+$)$3&%+,6#- Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 65/51  
  • 66. Realizing  the  Vision  Evolving  towards  a  worldwide  Physical  Internet     Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 66/51  
  • 67. The  Physical  Internet   Global  systemic  sustainable  vision   sHmulaHng  and  aligning  acHon  around  the  world  Individual  iniHaHves  by  businesses,  industries  and  governments   are  necessary  but  are  not  sufficient   There  is  a  need  for   a  macroscopic,  holisHc,  systemic  vision  offering   a  unifying,  challenging  and  sHmulaHng  framework   There  is  a  need  for   an  interlaced  set  of  global  and  local  iniHaHves     towards  this  vision,   building  on  the  shoulders  of  current  assets  and  projects,   to  help  evolve   from  the  current  globally  inefficient  and  unsustainable  state   to  a  desired  globally  efficient  and  sustainable  state   Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 67/51  
  • 68. Physical  Internet  ImplementaHon   Progressive  Deployment,  CohabitaHon  and  CerHficaHon   The  widespread  development  and  deployment   of  the  Physical  Internet   will  not  be  achieved  overnight  in  a  Big-­‐Bang  logic   but  rather  in  an  ongoing  logic   of  cohabitaHon  and  of  progressive  deployment,   propelled  by  the  actors   integraHng  gradually  the  Physical  Internet  ways  and  finding  ever  more  value  in  its  usage  and  exploitaHon   Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 68/51  
  • 69. Physical  Internet  ImplementaHon   Progressive  Deployment,  CohabitaHon  and  CerHficaHon  F A  smooth  transiHon   starHng  with  rethinking  and  retrofigng  phases,   then  moving  toward  more  transformaHve  phases  F The  Physical  Internet  can  consHtute  itself   progressively  through  the  mulH-­‐level  cerHficaHon  of:   –  Protocols   –  Containers   –  Handling  and  storage  technologies,  distribuHon  centers,   producHon  centers,  train  staHons,  ports,  mulHmodal  hubs   –  InformaHon  systems  (e.g.  reservaHon,  smart  labels,  portals)   –  Urban  zones  and  regions,  inter-­‐country  borders   Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 69/51  
  • 70. Conclusion   (1/2)  This  manifesto  has  outlined  a  bold  paradigm  breaking  vision   for  the  future  of   how  we  handle,  store,  transport,  realize,  supply  and  use   physical  objects  across  the  world   It  proposes  to  exploit  the  Internet,   which  has  revoluHonized  the  digital  world,   as  an  underlying  metaphor  for  steering  innovaHon   in  the  physical  sphere   The  outlined  Physical  Internet  does  not  aim   to  copy  the  Digital  Internet,   but  to  inspire  the  creaHon  of   a  bold  systemic  wide  encompassing  vision  capable  of  providing  real  efficient  and  sustainable  soluHons   to  the  problems  created  by  our  past  and  current  ways   and  by  our  vision  toward  which  we  should  aim   Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 70/51  
  • 71. Conclusion   (2/2)   With  this  manifesto  and  its  underlying  research,   a  small  step  has  been  made     A  lot  more  are  needed  to  really  shape  this  vision   and,  much  more  important,  to  give  it  flesh  through  real  iniHaHves  and  projects   so  as  to  really  influence  in  a  posiHve  way   our  collecHve  future   This  requires  a  lot  of  collaboraHon   between  academia,  industry  and  governments   across  localiHes,  countries  and  conHnents   Your  help  is  welcome   Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 71/51  
  • 72.   Questions and comments are welcome Questions et commentaires sont les bienvenus Fragen und Kommentare sind willkommenLas preguntas y los comentarios son bienvenidos     Benoit.Montreuil@cirrelt.ulaval.ca     www.physicalinterneHniHaHve.org   Physical  Internet  Manifesto,  version  1.10     Professor  Benoit  Montreuil,  CIRRELT,  Université  Laval   2011-06-28, 72/51