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Sol Le Witt Post Minimalism And Jewish Identity

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A closer look at artist Sol LeWitt...Jewish Identity in Postminimalism. Including a look at Jews who have contributed to the discourse of art history; as art critics, professors and historians.

A closer look at artist Sol LeWitt...Jewish Identity in Postminimalism. Including a look at Jews who have contributed to the discourse of art history; as art critics, professors and historians.


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  • “ Conceptual artists are mystics rather than rationalists. They leap to conclusions that logic cannot reach…illogical judgments lead to knew experience.” Sol LeWitt. 1969 Lucy Lippard uses this quote in her book, Six Years: The Dematerialism of the Art Object, 1997. The author dedicates this book, “to Sol”. Sol LeWitt wrote these words first on top of a list of artistic doctrines, in Sentences on Conceptual Art, 1968. A Post-Minimal performance by conceptual artist, John Baldessari, 1972, shows the artist singing in various tunes the prophetic sentences of Sol LeWitt. A code of artistic law and ethics, these sentences were sung symbolically as resonances of a cantor in prayer, or the declarations of a national anthem. The passages of Sol LeWitt’s Sentences on Conceptual Art and Paragraphs on Conceptual Art, 1967, are rooted in a time when Conceptual art was laying its structural foundations. LeWitt’s words become conceptual commandments and served to create a new identity for an evolving generation of artists. “The words of one artist to another may induce an idea chain, if they share the same concept.” Sol LeWitt, 19692
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    • 1. Sol LeWitt: Post-Minimalism and Jewish Identity By Paige Dansinger
    • 2. Sol LeWitt 1928-2007
    • 3. Wall Drawing #927 Loopy (green and blue), 1999. The Jewish Museum New York Wall Drawing #926 Loopy (yellow and purple), 1999. The Jewish Museum New York
    • 4. Black Form Memorial to the Missing Jews, 1987. Hamburg, Germany
    • 5. Looking for LeWitt’s Jewish Identity
    • 6. Sol LeWitt & Eadweard Muybridge
    • 7. Cross-references to other passages in Talmud       Cross-references to medieval codes of Jewish law       Key to scriptural quotations       Anonymous comment (printers?)       Notes by R. Aqiva Eger (Prussia, 1761-1837)       Comments of R. Nissim ben Jacob (Tunisia, 11th century)       Comments of the Tosafists (France and Germany, 12th-13th centuries)       Comments of Rashi (Northern France, 1040-1105 CE)       Gemara (Babylonia, about 500 CE)       Mishnah (Palestine, about 220 CE)      
    • 8. Printed announcement for an exhibition at the Dwan Gallery, Los Angeles
    • 9. Modular Cube, 1969. Art Gallery of Toronto Black and White Open Cubes , 1965-1969
    • 10. Post-Minimal Holocaust Memorial Structures
    • 11. Black Form Memorial to the Missing Jews, 1987. Hamburg, Germany
    • 12. Block, 1991. Concrete block. The Israel Museum Jerusalem
    • 13. Double Negative Pyramid, 1996. Concrete block. Europos Park, Vilniaus Lithuania
    • 14. X with Columns, 1996. Concrete block. The Walker Art Center, Minneapolis
    • 15. Richard Serra, The Drowned and the Saved, 1992. Pulheim, Germany
    • 16. Incomplete Cubes
    • 17. Incomplete Open Cubes, 1974
    • 18. Incomplete Open Cube 6/4 , 1974 Painted Aluminum
    • 19. Incomplete Open Cubes. Installation views The Wadsworth Athenaeum Museum of Art
    • 20. Incomplete Open Cubes. Installation views The Wadsworth Athenaeum Museum of Art
    • 21. Wall Drawings
    • 22.  
    • 23. Wall Drawing #808, 1996. The Whitney Museum of Art, NY. Wall Drawing #398, 1983. The Dallas Museum of Art
    • 24. Wall Drawing #766, 1994. Color ink wash
    • 25. Wall Drawing #880, 1998. PaceWildenstein, New York
    • 26. Wall Drawing #793 C, 1996. The Wadsworth Athenaeum
    • 27. Wall Drawing #927 Loopy (green and blue), 1999. The Jewish Museum New York Wall Drawing #926 Loopy (yellow and purple), 1999. The Jewish Museum New York
    • 28.