Getting Started with Research and Writing
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Getting Started with Research and Writing

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research, writing, writing process

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  • Apex Learning, Inc. (2007). Building language. Retrieved from http://www.beyondbooks.com/law81/index.asp
  • Hung, P-Y. and Popp, A. (2009, January 27). “Learning to Do Historical Research: A Primer How to Frame a Researchable Question.” Retrieved from http://geographerchat.wordpress.com/2009/01/27/ 研究提問怎麼提 by 肉圓邑 /
  • The Writing Lab. (2010). Why and how to create a useful outline. Retrieved from http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/544/02/
  • Adapted from: Sterling, M. (n.d.) Essay Outline Sample [Template] Retrieved from http://www.sthelens.k12.or.us/174320825162539897/lib/174320825162539897/Essay_Outline_Sample.htm
  • Learning strategies database . (n.d.) Retrieved February 3, 2009 from Muskingum College website: http://www.muskingum.edu/~cal/database/general/organization.html
  • Learning strategies database . (n.d.) Retrieved February 3, 2009 from Muskingum College website: http://www.muskingum.edu/~cal/database/general/organization.html
  • O’Neill, K. (2008, December 3). “Scribbled attempt at a research mind map.” Retrieved from http://looceefir.wordpress.com/2008/12/03/scribbled-attempt-at-a-research-mind-map/

Getting Started with Research and Writing Getting Started with Research and Writing Presentation Transcript

  • Natasha Luepke
    • Discussion/Final Project Topic
    • Unit 2 Assignment
    • The Writing Process
    • [Text of Question]
    • [Text of Assignment]
    • [Text of grading rubric]
    • Cover page
    • Page numbers
    • 12 point font for the entire document
    • Times New Roman font for the entire document
    • Double-spaced text (Memos are an exception)
    • A reference page if outside sources are used
    • Interesting
    • Researchable
    • Worthwhile
    • What’s a problem?
      • Too many people are late/absent
    • What are some causes for absenteeism? What are ways a department or company can improve attendance? What can individuals do? Are more people late or do more people miss work entirely?
    • Research: Causes of absenteeism/tardiness and ways to improve it
    • Persuade: We need a garden to improve attendance rates
    • In textbook, p 65+
    • Calendars
    • Goals – begin small
    • Schedule
    • Prepare and assemble
    • What are the similarities?
    • What are the differences?
    • No first or second person
    • No slang
    • No contractions
    • Point of view = perspective
    • First person: I, me, my, we
      • Emphasizes writer
    • Second person: you, your
      • Emphasizes reader
    • Third person: he, she, it, one
      • Emphasizes subject
      • Use this for academic writing; avoid first and second
    • What is the writing process?
    • Prewriting
    • Drafting/Writing
    • Revising
    • Editing/Proofreading
    • Publishing
    • Why?
    • Audience
    • Context
    • Research
    • Scope
    • Organization
    • Rough Draft
    • Revising/Editing
  •  
  •  
    • Free-writing
    • Listing/Outlining
    • Bubbling/Word Mapping
    • Questions
    • Looping
    • YOUR strategies?
    • For prewriting, can be informal:
    • Cats
      • 1. Small
      • 2. Fluffy
      • 3. Cute
    • My cats
      • 1. Alegria
      • a. Small, calico
      • 2. Sarafina
      • b. large, tabby
    • “ How do I create an outline?
    • Determine the purpose of your paper.
    • Determine the audience you are writing for.
    • Develop the thesis of your paper.
    • Then:
    • Brainstorm : List all the ideas that you want to include in your paper.
    • Organize : Group related ideas together.
    • Order : Arrange material in subsections from general to specific or from abstract to concrete.
    • Label : Create main and sub headings.”
    • I.
    •    A.
    •     B.
    •        1.
    •         2.
    •            a.
    •            b.
    • II.
    •    A.
    •     B.
    • Introduction
      • Get the reader's attention by asking a leading question; relay something enticing about the subject in a manner that commands attention. Start with a related quote, alluring description, or narration.
      • State the thesis 
    • II Body
    • A. First Point, Assertion, Explanation
      • 1. Supporting evidence (examples, facts, statistics, quoted authorities, details, reasons, examples)
      • 2. Supporting evidence  
    • B. Second explanation
      • 1. Support
      • 2. Support 
      • C. Your proposal (if applicable)  
    • D. Address opposing viewpoints
    • III. Conclusion
    • A. Show how explanations are logical; reiterate your assertion and proposition (if applicable). Reemphasize your thesis in a fresh way, showing how your have achieved your purpose.  
    • B. Appeal to the reader to see how you have come to a logical conclusion.  
    • C. Make a memorable final statement. 
  •  
  •  
  •  
    • Who, what, where, when, why, how
    • Causes?
    • What is it like or not like?
    • Changes?
    • Related to other things?
    • Reactions?
    • Definitions?
    • Freewrite 5 minutes, no stopping
    • Find central or most intriguing thought, and summarize in single sentence
    • Starting with that summary, freewrite for 5 minutes, no stopping
    • Keep going until you discover an angle/something about your topic you can use for the assignment
    • A thesis is a single sentence that sums up your main point or purpose.  It should be an answer to a question.
    • Three Prong
    • One Prong.
    • The KU Handbook for Writers (2008) points out,
    • The thesis should: Be a complete sentence. Identify a specific topic.
    • Make a specific assertion or point about that topic. (30)
    • The Handbook also points out, "Most papers are primarily expository or persuasive.  Expository papers present research to educate readers on a particular topic or problem.  Persuasive papers present research to change readers' opinion or to offer a solution to a particular problem" (31).
  •  
    • 1. Analyze the problem
    • 2. Establish a goal
    • 3. Brainstorm possible solutions (strategies)
    • 4. Create the solution
    • 5. Evaluate the solution: Will it actually solve the problem…, is there evidence?
    • 6. Adjust solution if necessary
  •  
    • Apex Learning, Inc. (2007). Building language. Retrieved from
      • http://www.beyondbooks.com/law81/index.asp
    • Hung, P-Y. and Popp, A. (2009, January 27). “Learning to Do Historical Research: A Primer How to
      • Frame a Researchable Question.” Retrieved from http://geographerchat.wordpress.com/2009/01/27/研究提問怎麼提by肉圓邑/
    • Learning strategies database . (n.d.) Retrieved
      • http://www.muskingum.edu/~cal/database/general/organization.html
    • ------ (n.d.) Retrieved http://www.muskingum.edu/~cal/database/general/organization.html
    • O’Neill, K. (2008, December 3). “Scribbled attempt at a research mind map.” Retrieved from
      • http://looceefir.wordpress.com/2008/12/03/scribbled-attempt-at-a-research-mind-map/
    • Sterling, M. (n.d.) Essay Outline Sample [Template] Retrieved from
      • http://www.sthelens.k12.or.us/174320825162539897/lib/174320825162539897/Essay_Outline_Sample.htm
    • VanDam, K. and Tysick, N. (Eds). (2008). KU handbook for writers . 2 nd Ed. Masson, OH: Cengage
      • Learning.
    • The Writing Lab. (2010). Why and how to create a useful outline. Retrieved from
      • http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/544/02/