PARAGRAPHS Natasha Luepke
Paragraphs <ul><li>Unit of text, usually 5 – 7 sentences. </li></ul><ul><li>Can be longer or shorter </li></ul><ul><li>Cen...
Paragraph Elements <ul><li>First sentence: Topic sentence </li></ul><ul><li>Other sentences: supporting details </li></ul>
Supporting Details <ul><li>Concise but detailed </li></ul><ul><li>Too many short paragraphs = choppy </li></ul><ul><li>Lar...
When do I need a new Paragraph? <ul><li>New idea </li></ul><ul><li>Emphasis </li></ul><ul><li>Dialogue </li></ul><ul><li>P...
Sentence Types <ul><li>Declarative:  Make a statement The echo always has the last word. </li></ul><ul><li>Imperative:  Ma...
Development  <ul><li>Use examples and illustrations </li></ul><ul><li>Cite data (facts, statistics, evidence, details, and...
Paragraph  in action <ul><li>I have a cat.  Her name is Alegria.  Her name means “happiness” but we usually call her Allie...
Editing! <ul><li>I spent five minutes editing  </li></ul><ul><li>I moved things, deleted things, and added things </li></u...
Questions, Comments, Concerns?
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Paragraphs

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Paragraphs

  1. 1. PARAGRAPHS Natasha Luepke
  2. 2. Paragraphs <ul><li>Unit of text, usually 5 – 7 sentences. </li></ul><ul><li>Can be longer or shorter </li></ul><ul><li>Centered on one topic </li></ul><ul><li>Sentence Variety </li></ul>
  3. 3. Paragraph Elements <ul><li>First sentence: Topic sentence </li></ul><ul><li>Other sentences: supporting details </li></ul>
  4. 4. Supporting Details <ul><li>Concise but detailed </li></ul><ul><li>Too many short paragraphs = choppy </li></ul><ul><li>Large (one page) paragraphs = hard tp read </li></ul>
  5. 5. When do I need a new Paragraph? <ul><li>New idea </li></ul><ul><li>Emphasis </li></ul><ul><li>Dialogue </li></ul><ul><li>Pause </li></ul><ul><li>Breaking up long text by moving to subtopic </li></ul>
  6. 6. Sentence Types <ul><li>Declarative: Make a statement The echo always has the last word. </li></ul><ul><li>Imperative: Make a demand Love your neighbor. </li></ul><ul><li>Interrogative: Ask a question Are second thoughts always wisest? </li></ul><ul><li>Exclamatory: Make an exclamation I want to wash the flag, not burn it! </li></ul>
  7. 7. Development <ul><li>Use examples and illustrations </li></ul><ul><li>Cite data (facts, statistics, evidence, details, and others) </li></ul><ul><li>Examine testimony (what other people say such as quotes and paraphrases) </li></ul><ul><li>Use an anecdote or story </li></ul><ul><li>Define terms in the paragraph </li></ul><ul><li>Compare and contrast </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluate causes and reasons </li></ul><ul><li>Examine effects and consequences </li></ul><ul><li>Analyze the topic </li></ul><ul><li>Describe the topic </li></ul><ul><li>Offer a chronology of an event (time segments) </li></ul><ul><li>(OWL at Purdue, 2009) </li></ul>
  8. 8. Paragraph in action <ul><li>I have a cat. Her name is Alegria. Her name means “happiness” but we usually call her Allie, Fluffs, or Fluffy. She is a very fluffy calico. She is thirteen years old and a very cranky old lady. Allie likes to hide under the coffee table or sit on piles of clothes. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Editing! <ul><li>I spent five minutes editing </li></ul><ul><li>I moved things, deleted things, and added things </li></ul><ul><li>Editing is important, no matter what we write </li></ul>
  10. 10. Questions, Comments, Concerns?

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