Conciseness and SAE Natasha Luepke
Agenda <ul><li>Conciseness </li></ul><ul><li>Standard American English </li></ul>
Conciseness <ul><li>What does it mean to be concise? </li></ul>
Conciseness <ul><li>Why is being concise important in a business situation? </li></ul>
Concise Tips <ul><li>Remove unnecessary or redundant words. </li></ul><ul><li>Take out empty words </li></ul><ul><li>Repla...
Removing Words <ul><li>Consider what the audience already knows </li></ul><ul><li>Consider the obvious  </li></ul>
Example <ul><li>Wordy : Imagine a mental picture of someone engaged in the intellectual activity of trying to learn what t...
<ul><li>Wordy : Imagine a mental picture of someone engaged in the intellectual activity of trying to learn what the rules...
Redundancy <ul><li>Avoid saying the same thing twice in a row. </li></ul><ul><li>I mean, avoid saying the same thing twice...
Redundant Examples <ul><li>Redundant </li></ul><ul><li>12 noon </li></ul><ul><li>Close proximity </li></ul><ul><li>Each an...
Empty Words <ul><li>Empty words are filler, and do not add anything to your overall message </li></ul>
Empty Examples <ul><li>kind of  </li></ul><ul><li>sort of  </li></ul><ul><li>type of  </li></ul><ul><li>really  </li></ul>...
Meaningless Modifiers <ul><li>Absolutely </li></ul><ul><li>Awesome </li></ul><ul><li>Awfully </li></ul><ul><li>Central </l...
Phrases <ul><li>You can often replace a long, wordy phrase with just one word </li></ul>
Phrase Examples <ul><li>Wordy </li></ul><ul><li>At all times </li></ul><ul><li>At the present time </li></ul><ul><li>At th...
It is/There are <ul><li>These phrases are called “expletives.” </li></ul><ul><li>Can be useful for emphasis </li></ul><ul>...
It is/There are Examples <ul><li>Wordy : It is the governor who signs or vetoes bills. (9 words) </li></ul><ul><li>Concise...
Standard American English <ul><li>“ Standard American English is the communal language of educated professionals.  It is e...
What is it? <ul><li>It can be easier to think of examples of non-standard American English: </li></ul><ul><li>Y’all, howdy...
How do I learn SAE? <ul><li>If those around you do not speak SAE, it can be difficult to learn. </li></ul><ul><li>Read as ...
Questions?
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Conciseness and SAE

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Conciseness and SAE

  1. 1. Conciseness and SAE Natasha Luepke
  2. 2. Agenda <ul><li>Conciseness </li></ul><ul><li>Standard American English </li></ul>
  3. 3. Conciseness <ul><li>What does it mean to be concise? </li></ul>
  4. 4. Conciseness <ul><li>Why is being concise important in a business situation? </li></ul>
  5. 5. Concise Tips <ul><li>Remove unnecessary or redundant words. </li></ul><ul><li>Take out empty words </li></ul><ul><li>Replace phrases with a single word </li></ul><ul><li>Reconsider sentences with “it is” and “there is/are.” </li></ul><ul><li>Adapted from Lunsford, A. (2005) The Everyday Writer (3 rd ed). Boston, MA: Bedford/St. Martin’s </li></ul>
  6. 6. Removing Words <ul><li>Consider what the audience already knows </li></ul><ul><li>Consider the obvious </li></ul>
  7. 7. Example <ul><li>Wordy : Imagine a mental picture of someone engaged in the intellectual activity of trying to learn what the rules are for how to play the game of chess. (27 words) </li></ul><ul><li>From Writing Lab, OWL at Purdue, Purdue University. (2006) The OWL at Perdue . < owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/572/01 > [10 Mar 09] </li></ul>
  8. 8. <ul><li>Wordy : Imagine a mental picture of someone engaged in the intellectual activity of trying to learn what the rules are for how to play the game of chess. (27 words) </li></ul><ul><li>Concise : Imagine someone trying to learn the rules of chess. (9 words) </li></ul><ul><li>From Writing Lab, OWL at Purdue, Purdue University. (2006) The OWL at Perdue . < owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/572/01 > [10 Mar 09] </li></ul>
  9. 9. Redundancy <ul><li>Avoid saying the same thing twice in a row. </li></ul><ul><li>I mean, avoid saying the same thing twice! </li></ul>
  10. 10. Redundant Examples <ul><li>Redundant </li></ul><ul><li>12 noon </li></ul><ul><li>Close proximity </li></ul><ul><li>Each and every </li></ul><ul><li>End result </li></ul><ul><li>Exactly the same </li></ul><ul><li>Free gift </li></ul><ul><li>Period of four days </li></ul><ul><li>Repeat again </li></ul><ul><li>Small in size </li></ul><ul><li>True facts </li></ul><ul><li>Concise </li></ul><ul><li>Noon </li></ul><ul><li>Proximity </li></ul><ul><li>Each [or every] </li></ul><ul><li>Result </li></ul><ul><li>The same </li></ul><ul><li>Gift </li></ul><ul><li>Four days </li></ul><ul><li>Repeat </li></ul><ul><li>Small </li></ul><ul><li>Facts </li></ul>
  11. 11. Empty Words <ul><li>Empty words are filler, and do not add anything to your overall message </li></ul>
  12. 12. Empty Examples <ul><li>kind of </li></ul><ul><li>sort of </li></ul><ul><li>type of </li></ul><ul><li>really </li></ul><ul><li>basically </li></ul><ul><li>for all intents and purposes </li></ul><ul><li>definitely </li></ul><ul><li>actually </li></ul><ul><li>generally </li></ul><ul><li>individual </li></ul><ul><li>specific </li></ul><ul><li>particular </li></ul>
  13. 13. Meaningless Modifiers <ul><li>Absolutely </li></ul><ul><li>Awesome </li></ul><ul><li>Awfully </li></ul><ul><li>Central </li></ul><ul><li>Definitely </li></ul><ul><li>Fine </li></ul><ul><li>Interesting </li></ul><ul><li>Great </li></ul><ul><li>Literally </li></ul><ul><li>Major </li></ul><ul><li>Really </li></ul><ul><li>Very </li></ul>
  14. 14. Phrases <ul><li>You can often replace a long, wordy phrase with just one word </li></ul>
  15. 15. Phrase Examples <ul><li>Wordy </li></ul><ul><li>At all times </li></ul><ul><li>At the present time </li></ul><ul><li>At that point in time </li></ul><ul><li>Due to the fact that </li></ul><ul><li>For the purpose of </li></ul><ul><li>In order to </li></ul><ul><li>In spite of the fact that </li></ul><ul><li>In the event that </li></ul><ul><li>Concise </li></ul><ul><li>Always </li></ul><ul><li>Now/today/presently </li></ul><ul><li>Then </li></ul><ul><li>Because </li></ul><ul><li>For </li></ul><ul><li>To </li></ul><ul><li>Although </li></ul><ul><li>If </li></ul>
  16. 16. It is/There are <ul><li>These phrases are called “expletives.” </li></ul><ul><li>Can be useful for emphasis </li></ul><ul><li>Overuse = wordy </li></ul>
  17. 17. It is/There are Examples <ul><li>Wordy : It is the governor who signs or vetoes bills. (9 words) </li></ul><ul><li>Concise : The governor signs or vetoes bills. (6 words) </li></ul><ul><li>Wordy : There are four rules that should be observed: ... (8 words) </li></ul><ul><li>Concise : Four rules should be observed:... (5 words) </li></ul><ul><li>From Writing Lab, OWL at Purdue, Purdue University. (2006) The OWL at Perdue . < owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/572/01 > [10 Mar 09] </li></ul>
  18. 18. Standard American English <ul><li>“ Standard American English is the communal language of educated professionals. It is easily understood by persons from all geographical regions, different educational backgrounds, and different ethnic and racial associations. </li></ul><ul><li>Persons who deal with the public and who want to present themselves as educated professionals need to understand the importance of having professional quality communication skills.” </li></ul><ul><li>-- James L. Fitch, Ph.D. Auburn University </li></ul>
  19. 19. What is it? <ul><li>It can be easier to think of examples of non-standard American English: </li></ul><ul><li>Y’all, howdy, dere [there], tree [three], pin [pen], pop, cah [car], ain’t, don’t for doesn’t, be for are/am </li></ul>
  20. 20. How do I learn SAE? <ul><li>If those around you do not speak SAE, it can be difficult to learn. </li></ul><ul><li>Read as much as you can, and watch/listen to as much as you can </li></ul><ul><li>Practice </li></ul><ul><li>Take quizzes </li></ul><ul><li>Ask questions </li></ul><ul><li>Know your audience </li></ul>
  21. 21. Questions?

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