Getting to know our students
 
<ul><li>Do you observe your students? When? </li></ul><ul><li>Do you think it’s important for a teacher to know certain th...
<ul><li>Read the article entitled: Children: How They Grow, Elementary School Children – Ages 9 to 12. </li></ul><ul><li>H...
<ul><li>Try a notebook of incidents  </li></ul><ul><li>Try adding important information about the group in your lesson pla...
<ul><li>Positive feedback </li></ul><ul><li>Praise your students </li></ul><ul><li>Give emotional support </li></ul><ul><l...
<ul><li>Refers to the phenomenon in which the greater the expectation placed upon people, the better they perform. </li></ul>
<ul><li>Robert Rosenthal and Lenore Jacobson (1968/1992) report and discuss the Pygmalion effect at length.  </li></ul><ul...
<ul><li>The purpose of the experiment was to support the hypothesis that reality can be influenced by the expectations of ...
 
<ul><li>Do you remember a case in which you had a labeled student? </li></ul><ul><li>What was your attitude towards this s...
 
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Children’s characteristics session 1

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There is a need to know our students, not only their interests but common changes they suffer in their growing process. The fact of knowing our students better may affect our teaching in a positive way.

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Children’s characteristics session 1

  1. 1. Getting to know our students
  2. 3. <ul><li>Do you observe your students? When? </li></ul><ul><li>Do you think it’s important for a teacher to know certain things about his/ her students? Why? </li></ul><ul><li>How does knowing your students better may affect your teaching? </li></ul>
  3. 4. <ul><li>Read the article entitled: Children: How They Grow, Elementary School Children – Ages 9 to 12. </li></ul><ul><li>Highlight the characteristics that are common to your students </li></ul><ul><li>Write a summery of it on a piece of writing paper. </li></ul><ul><li>State how knowing this may affect your teaching. (Give Examples) </li></ul>
  4. 5. <ul><li>Try a notebook of incidents </li></ul><ul><li>Try adding important information about the group in your lesson plan </li></ul><ul><li>You may use a checklist of observable behavior </li></ul>
  5. 6. <ul><li>Positive feedback </li></ul><ul><li>Praise your students </li></ul><ul><li>Give emotional support </li></ul><ul><li>Care about their weaknesses and problems </li></ul><ul><li>Pygmalion effect </li></ul>
  6. 7. <ul><li>Refers to the phenomenon in which the greater the expectation placed upon people, the better they perform. </li></ul>
  7. 8. <ul><li>Robert Rosenthal and Lenore Jacobson (1968/1992) report and discuss the Pygmalion effect at length. </li></ul><ul><li>In their study, they showed that if teachers were led to expect enhanced performance from some children, then the children indeed show that enhancement. </li></ul>
  8. 9. <ul><li>The purpose of the experiment was to support the hypothesis that reality can be influenced by the expectations of others. </li></ul>
  9. 11. <ul><li>Do you remember a case in which you had a labeled student? </li></ul><ul><li>What was your attitude towards this student? </li></ul><ul><li>Do you think applying the Pygmalion effect with difficult students may help reach your goals? How can you do that? </li></ul><ul><li>Share your experience with other colleagues. </li></ul>
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