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10 Trends in Social and Digital Media
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10 Trends in Social and Digital Media

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Too often do professionals focus on individual social or digital media platforms/products - how to effectively use Twitter, or set up a Linkedin profile, etc. This presentation is a step back, ...

Too often do professionals focus on individual social or digital media platforms/products - how to effectively use Twitter, or set up a Linkedin profile, etc. This presentation is a step back, attempting to give a simple, big picture overview of the online ecosystem and the major trends defining it.

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  • Trends in Social and Digital Media…
  • My name is Mario Vasilescu, from Toronto, Canada. I’m the winner of a national Canadian competitionfor predicting the workplace in the year 2040, and as a result I also received the opportunity of working a 6 month contract with the Institute for Leadership here at BPI. I have also been working on a project for just over a year – I am an entrepreneur, cofounder of www.rewordly.com, a startup that aims to help you make the most of your reading and writing online, across all platforms, by organizing it better, in one place, and allowing you to use it for your personal branding.Claire thought it would be interesting for me to present my winning concept but, since it is quite advanced for some, and is based on current trends in digital and social media, I felt it would be interesting to first present on these topics and, should you still be interested, you could come to the next English presentation in 6 weeks, when I will present my concept.
  • So, from what I understand, there have been enough presentations on the basics of Social Media, such as setting up a Linkedin account, or how to use Twitter. So I don’t want to cover the HOW of Social Media, I want to cover the WHY. And beyond that, I don’t understand why the focus should only be on Social Media when there are so many other elements in the digital ecosystem beyond Social Media. So today is for people who know the basics of Social Media, to take you to that next level by giving you a perspective on the big picture – to help you understand why you bothered with those basics in the first place!
  • That said, if today you were hoping for more of that “how” I mentioned, here is a very quick summary of the major Social Media platforms – so even for those of you that came to the wrong presentation, you get a nice 1 minute freebie that should help bring you up to speed Facebook is what you’re doing, with it’s 1B+ users it’s the universal online profileTwitter is short 140 character bursts of what you’re thinking – or, lately, more so what you’re thinking about something you found on the web (~80% of Tweets are content based i.e. links)Instagram Is what you’re looking at, by taking photos with your smartphone, adding filters, and uploading it into a social community based on these aesthetically upgraded photos.Linkedin/Viadeo is what you’re doing professionally, the professional element of your online presence;Pinterest is what you’re looking at online, specifically – whereas Instagram is about real life, Pinterest is about creating a virtual scrapbook out of your favourite images (and now videos) that you find online.A couple of recent additions to the “bigger” sharing platforms are Snapchat and Vine. Both cater to people who want to capture and share photos or video without having to think too much about it. In Snapchat’s case, when you share a photo with somebody, it is automatically deleted from their phone within 10 seconds – so it is a temporary share. For Vine, it lets you create 6-second-long video clips – almost like animated images - to share. Even though Vine clips are not temporary, their easy but calculated creation again represents this idea of instantaneous, care-free sharing.Quora is a representation of your opinion, by answering and asking questions in a professional environment (it’s like the professional version of Yahoo, where those answering you are likely true experts in the matter)Foursquare is where you are – you check-in to places for symbolic and real rewards.Yelp Is what you think about what you did in the sense that it’s a community of reviewers based on places visited.Lastly, Wordpress, Blogger, and Tumblr are the main blogging platforms, so they are what you think in an extended/limitless format – where Twitter is micro-blogging, this is the full deal. That said, note that Tumblr is much more of a curatorial site these days than creation – but that’s something we’ll cover with our first 2 trends!
  • So those were the basics and, like I said, that’s not the focus today. Today I want to give you some context. And I’m going to do that by presenting to you 10 trends to be aware of in the digital, connected world around us.
  • They are:Creation and Curation in the form of Social Content; Trends in the engagement of digital content in the form of gamification and user-centric design; Tends how conveniently we find our digital interactions, in the form of a term you’ve likely heard many times, “the cloud”, and our safety in the digital medium with the trends of privacy and security; Next are trends in the analysis of all this digital interaction, starting with another term I’m sure you’ve heard, “Big Data”, and also the analytics to go with that “Big Data”; And I’ll finish up with trends in digital reality – this was something I added on because I like nice round binary numbers like 10, but I think they may actually be the most important ones. These last trends are those that will effect our very reality by way of integrating the digital medium in new ways, and they are Augmented Reality technology and – another term that, if you haven’t heard yet, I bet will soon be as familiar to you as “the cloud” or “big data” – “The Internet of Things”.
  • Now, before we dive in, I just want to first make clear why these trends are important and give you some background.Firstly, they’re important because some of them are defining our world now, while others will very soon be substantially transforming our world.But, beyond this, they are important because you – whether you as an individual, or you as a business owner – need to understand them and use them to remain competitive. Knowledge on these topics is an asset, and being familiar with them will make you more valuable and competitive.
  • So, these are the 10 trends, in diagram form, and you will be tested on this at the end!But, of course, I’m just kidding. I wanted to show this to you now so that you see that, even though it may seem overwhelming now, it will make perfect, simple sense when we’re all through. We’ll go one by one and it will be crystal clear.
  • So, I said we’ll go step by step, and before we get to the trends themselves, there are a few foundation steps – and the first one is: you. It all starts with you. None of this digital and social media interaction can exist, or has a reason to exist, without the end user, and that’s you. So here you are – the real-world you, sitting in this room now – physical; skin-meat-and-bones real.
  • Then we introduce the Internet – a whole giant mess of information which we interact with to gain resources and knowledge, and to communicate. It begins becoming an extension of your real-world capabilities.
  • Now, with the advent of Social Media, that digital realm allows you to create a truly virtual version of your self. A virtual you. I’m not suggesting a 3D avatar replication of yourself, (though you can certainly attain that online, if you like, and spend your time in a virtual world like Second Life), but rather such a well-rounded and deep representation of your interests, opinions, and tastes that you collectively create a fairly nuanced “you”. It’s the virtual you. And for the record, that’s why it’s so valuable – in many ways, you’re presenting much, much more about yourself to others and companies than they would ever find out in real life, short of you telling them or them spying on you.
  • Some examples of this data about you: Facebook uses all their users information to create a Social Graph (mapping your social network/interactions), Google uses it to create a Knowledge Graph (mapping user queries and information relationship patterns). The third “graph” that is sometimes also referred to in this context, and I would argue is a sub-component of the Social Graph, is the Interest Graph(mapping the aggregate interest trends of users)
  • The last foundation piece before the trends: on the note of the functional side of the matter, I want to touch on the topic of participation. It surprises me that individuals, but especially companies, are still even asking “should we be online?”. It boggles my mind that this is still even debated. As mentioned, arguably more opinion and decision-making happens online than in the real world, and so if you’re not there, you don’t get a seat at the table - you don’t have a voice in the matter. Beyond that, as you can see from the diagram, it’s not just you plugged into the internet, it’s the whole world, people, companies and all. You only get to connect with a tiny fraction of that in your real life, so without the internet, you also lose the opportunity to connect with the majority of people, which you can only have access to through this medium. The skeptics will argue “but so much of the internet is junk, this is a good situation”, to which I counter, that for every few stupid comments or banal web pages on the internet, there is at least one which is a gem of learning and opportunity. So, again, before we dive in, I believe it is no longer an option – participate or don’t compete, because if you’re not firmly online, you are choosing to not exist in more than half of this connected world as we know it today.
  • So, let’s finallyzero in on the trends, starting with the first 2:Social Media, is SOCIAL. It relies on conversation, but especially on indirect communication. Rather than direct dialogue, like messenger services or emails, it is more so about reactive dialogue. Instead of me choosing to specifically and intentionally message you, it is more so about me finding something interesting, and sharing it into this open internet space, and then letting it float there for you, or you, or you to come across and perhaps comment on. That’s when the spark happens. That’s the reactive dialogue, and it’s at the heart of Social Media. And that “something interesting” is content. That’s what is needed today to create that spark or leave that good impression. 2013 is said to be the year of Content, and the expression “Content is King” has been around for some time.
  • Which brings us to the first 2 trends, in Social Content, of Content Creation and Content Curation.
  • They are the engine of Social Media, and so you see them here, sitting smack dab at the core of it.
  • Content creation is producing something new and original, authored specifically by you. Instagram is a great, simple example, of users creating content in the form of pictures they took, and further made unique by the filters they throw onto them. Vimeo is a platform for creating and sharing videos – more so for filmmakers, whereas Youtube is more so for vloggers – though I’m not including the latter because it’s trending more toward a misguided form of curation these days. Blogger is, of course, creation, by posting original written content. And Quora, again original by posting original thoughts or answers that are exclusively of your own creation. Then we have CURATION which is the hot thing made all the more popular by the explosion of Pinterest. Curation is collecting your favourite items, and presenting those collected items, or collections of items, as a representation of your opinion. Though one could argue the functional purpose is for your own convenience – collecting what you like – this curation is very, very heavily embedded into Social Media. Collected items are essentially meant to be shared, by nature. Beyond Pinterest, we have Tumblr, which started off as a blogging platofrm but is now much more of a curation platform, with users usually posting things from across the web, and those items being endlessly reposted through the tumblr community. Pearltrees is no longer as popular as it once was, but was arguably the first big curation platform, before the topic was so “in”.
  • So there you have Content creation and curation in the big scheme of things.
  • Next, we move on to the trends in engagement: how is the real you helped into engaging better and more deeply with this virtual world, further enhancing the virtual you? The 2 trends I’ve chosen to focus on in this area, are gamification and web 2.0 design (or user-centric design)
  • These trends enhance your reach into the virtual world, and in many ways make you more attracted and invested in your digital interaction, thereby helping this virtual world also reach a bit further into your real world.
  • First, we have gamification, which is the application of concepts and techniques from games, to non-game activities. This application of game concepts is achieved through game mechanics, or dynamics, such as “appointment dynamics”, like in the famously popular online Facebook game Farmville, where users were taught that in order for their virtual crops to survive, they would need to be watered at a set interval. And it was extremely effective for channeling user interaction – as Seth Priebatsch said in his TED talk on the topic, Farmville could probably set that interval to 30 minutes and nobody would ever get anything done every again. They’d have us all at their mercy!Another gamified element you’re seeing appear all over the web on profiles is the profile completion bar! The website administrator has a target of information to attain from you, and so they set up this little bar or meter to let you know how far you’ve come, often with little quips about how close or far you are – and it’s extremely effective! It makes you feel incomplete, or inadequate! This left image is straight from my Linkedin profile, and the fact that it has that little sliver missing at the top just eats at me, making me really want to figure out what information I can provide to get this fictional little bit of pixels topped up! This is a vague version of the “achievement” game dynamic, but a clearer one is the example of points or badges, which Foursquare has famously applied to great success. This is also an example of the “status” dynamic. They want to incentivize you to visit certain businesses more often, so they offer up not only some real rewards, like a discount, but some gamified symbolic rewards along the way – and, often, this is what users actually cling to most proudly! They want to be the Mayor of that particular Starbucks, and unlock that particular Mayor badge! They want to be able to share that, and it has worked well on users.
  • The next trend in engagement is that of Web 2.0 design, or User-Centric design.During the earlier iterations of the web, i.e. 90’s and early 00’s, websites were more like document systems – they were information-oriented. A website administrator would load up their information, and visitors would view this information with minimal interaction. As the web became more social, this website paradigm of course shifted. Instead of static information viewing, the information on a website was something to interact with, providing a multitude of feedback and even interacting with the other visitors.As a result, the web design shifted from document-style design. With web 2.0, information is a given; today, it is how effectively that information is reached and understood that drives value. As such, the modern web is based on user-centric design. In this slide you can see web design more reminiscent of web 1.0, and the one below more along the lines of web 2.0 – it includes clear, minimalist design with a unmistakable call to action and prominent sharing and feedback elements.
  • Now we move on to the trends of convenience: as we become more engaged with this digital world, and more invested in the “virtual you”, it becomes more important to have continuous access, which can be done with “the cloud”; and privacy and security trends go hand-in-hand with it to ensure that continuous access doesn’t erode privacy or make you completely vulnerable to hacking or theft.
  • The first trend of “the cloud” refers to your data, and therefore access to your data, moving from hard drives that you own – whether on your computer, or an external drive – to external third-party drives that you access via internet connection. This remote storage of data, accessed with a connection, is “the cloud”. It’s the perfect analogy because the end result is that your data, instead of being stuck in specific physical places, feels more like it is in a fictional cloud, all around you, and accessible whenever and wherever you want. With social media your interactions became affixed to account-based, remotely accessible portals, and the cloud is the extension of this: moving your data into a virtual, device-independent space as well.So the main outcomes of the cloud: continual access, across devices and locations, limited only by your internet connection.This has taken on many forms, from individual cloud storage (Dropbox and Google Drive), enterprise cloud storage (box), cloud music services (Deezer, Spotify, Rdio, etc), cloud-based personal resources (Evernote) – and combinations of all of these, like in Apple’s iCloud, and now Sony’s new PlayStation 4, where everything associated with the system, whether it be music, games, software, or personal details, are all accessible from the cloud.
  • But with our interactions, and now our data as well, becoming virtual and account-based, this means increased vulnerabilities. This is the extremely important topic of Privacy and Security.Privacy is the fact that through social media – in creating this virtual you – it is often difficult to manage who sees what, and which of your actions online get broadcast to untold observers. Facebook, understandably, has been the best example of this, with countless waves of complaints relative to the privacy settings users have access to. Instagram, when purchased by Facebook, initially created a massive revolt when a new ToS agreement was presented to users, stating that their pictures could be used in advertisements. These terms were reversed after widespread outrage, but they are a great example of the privacy issues that emerge when so much of your personal information and interaction are on third-party, virtual platforms.
  • That is the Privacy side of things. There is also the Security side.Privacy concerns: misunderstandings about the visibility or use of your information (Privacy) in relation to the decisions of the platforms ownersSecurity concerns: exposure to malicious attacks to compromise or steal your personal information or data beyond the control of you or the virtual/third-party platform owners.With our interactions and data no longer local, they traverse a broad network. And this journey exposes us. Working backwards from the source of our data:Connection dependence: your data and your interactions with it flow exclusively over a connection. That connection is a new potential target.Spread of accounts: Cloud access, like all things online, is based on accounts. This is in addition to all your social media accounts. This all means many accounts associated with you, and therefore more opportunities to gain access to your information – and the problem is that just one cracked account is needed to likely gain access to all your accounts. Your username and/or password are often the same.Multiple access points: being accessible across multiple devices, the cloud promotes diverse access. You now have multiple devices to try to keep secure.Unfortunately for the world, in conjunction with these expanded vulnerabilities, hackers have also upgraded their tactics:- in response to connection dependence, hackers have taken to increasingly hacking the servers and databases that hold so much of this cloud-based information – whether simple personal information or actual “cloud-based” files. With the spread of accounts, hackers have upgraded their hardware and software to crack some of these accounts, using Brute Force Attacks i.e. using an algorithm to rapidly try 100,000 or more password variations on one of your more vulnerable accounts. Once they get in one place, they’ll fairly easily find a way into all of your other accounts too. And the less complex approach of email “phishing” has also evolved, with all of us receiving official-looking emails that require logins that are virtually indistinguishable from the real thing. Lastly, multiple access points means multiple devices that can be virused, compromised, account-hacked, etc – again representing an entry point to the rest of the “virtual you”.(this all goes without mentioning the attacks than can also happen over unsecured networks; the public, increasingly dependant on the cloud, also increasingly uses public networks, exposing themselves to malicious hackers then as well)
  • And so having told you that, you’re probably not so surprised anymore by the headlines this past year. These included many, many high profile cases of hacking – from Evernote needing to reset 50 Million Passwords or to broad swaths of Twitter accounts becoming compromised, to the Ministry of Defence in the U.K. and the White House in the U.S. having their databases infiltrated.
  • And so the new battle, to coincide with this increasingly ubiquitous connectivity, is placing robust security between the virtual you – including your slice of the cloud – and everybody else.This manifests itself in a variety of ways on the industry end (making virtual and physical processes relating to their data storage more secure), but on the consumer side of things (both B2C and B2B), it is primarily visible in the changes to how you access your devices and accounts.Accounts and profiles are moving to two-factor authentication – i.e. a single password not being enough, but also requiring a unique SMS code sent to your phone.And for devices, fingerprint/biometric scanners to use them. As Deloitte’s director of TMT Duncan Stewart has said, “it’s no coincidence the Home button on your Apple devices is the size it is.”
  • So we’ve already gone though 6 trends. The first 4 are all about you creating this “virtual you” and making it more engaging and full, No. 5 – the cloud – was about making it all accessible everywhere, and No. 6 of Privacy and Security started indicating that all this flow of information and virtual identity needs to be managed.Which is the segway into Nos. 7 and 8: trends of analysis, specifically “Big Data” and “Analytics”. All this activity going on, everybody having so many interactions online – which is now everywhere and anywhere – means a lot of data.
  • To better visualize how it fits, we finally arrive to the full diagram I showed you at the beginning of the presentation. You might think of it like this:The virtual you that you’ve created through all this information interaction, is just that: information. It is data. A lot of it. And it gets to be there by you injecting it into the system whenever you add or interact with it. This is the information flow, and a large part of it is when you interact with businesses. After all, even Facebook is a business, and millions of businesses also use it, benefitting from its free page analytics, as well as their ability to use Facebook to very specifically target who to advertise to. Much of the same can be said for all the other main social networks. Besides them, there are also the many online retailers who you interact with.And it’s important to understand that this data we speak of is only the explicit data you volunteer – such as your name and birth date and the things you like. The other part of the information flow is all the implicit data about your usage: how much time did you spend on a page? Which part of the page did you spend the most time on? Where do you usually click when shopping? What time of day or time of the month do you usually make your purchases? What colour of items do you most purchase? And on and on and on. Behavioural patterns at the micro and macro level.Both the explicit information you provide and the implicit data it generates flow – encouraged by gamification and web 2.0-inspired design – through to businesses. This is the Big Data. And now businesses are in the position of having enormous amounts of data, and trying to find ways to do something with it to improve their performance. This applies to improving but also improving experiences – whether as a retail consumer, or as an employee using an intranet platform.The analysis of this Big Data is the associated trend of Analytics, and it is also why we have seen the emergence of the Data Scientist as the hottest job on the market. They are the ones who will break down all this Big Data and provide the mechanisms for Analytics – and It is projected by 2018 there will be a shortage of nearly 200K Data Scientists in the U.S. alone! If you want to be guaranteed high-paying employment for life, become a Data Scientist. Analytics software will be what makes it possible to find the extremely valuable competitive insight from all this Big Data.
  • And in case you still weren’t convinced of how how much data we’re producing – why it’s BIG Data – here is a graph to put it in perspective for you.In 2011, so less than 2 years ago, we were already producing about 2 zettabytes of data – that’s 2 trillion GB. By 2015 it’s projected to quadruple to about 8. And by 2020 it will be getting close to 5 times even that number. It can be safely said that the amount of data produced is in parallel to Moore’s law – namely as machines get exponentially faster, the amount of data we produce grows exponentially as well.
  • Now, these last 2 trends I added as a bonus, but I think they are perhaps the most important of all.
  • They are the trends of digital reality, namely how everything we talked about before – the virtual you and all the elements that go with it – will be transposed back into the physical world.
  • With Augmented Reality (or AR technology as it’s referred to), and the Internet of Things, the virtual you and the real-world you will begin to be the same thing.
  • So, what is Augmented Reality Technology?Augmented Reality technology super-imposes images over the physical world you are viewing to add relevant information or sights. These generally fall into three categories:1. Viewing anything through a camera and screen, and seeing the camera image as well as overlaid content.2. A code on physical materials that, when viewed through a camera, triggers added content to appear when viewed through the camera.3. Using projections – whether real or virtual (as seen through a camera) – and sensors to turn ordinary objects into controllers.
  • I’m sure all of you have heard all about Google Glass, Google’s latest device which is the first mass-market-intended application of wearable technology. This product is significant because it is the first in what will become a huge industry – similar to how the iphone exploded the smart phone market.But it is perhaps even more significant because of the way it applies Augmented Reality. See the video to get a sense of how it works. It takes all your online profiles and lets you interact with them as you perceive the real world.(and don’t worry, if this frightens you, you’re not alone – there is a fairly vocal group of people who find this technology problematic for a variety of reasons. But remember that even if this version fails, I can guarantee somebody will find a mass-market solution within the year. Apple and Samsung are already working on their own versions, according to filed patents.)
  • Finally, beyond Augmented Reality helping to move all the information we’ve stored online back into our physical world – the physical world around us will increasingly become connected. This is the final trend, and that is “the Internet of Things”, a trend that should be nearly as familiar to you as “the cloud” or “big data” at this point.The Internet of Things refers to the fact that microcomputers and complex circuits have gotten so small, that it is possible to make any object “smart” and “connected”. Your clock, your toaster, your refrigerator, your mop – you name it, and it can likely be altered to be connected to the internet, relaying basic information relevant to its purpose to you. In the coming years, as all objects get plugged in, we’ll see an unprecedented level of automation spring up around us – and you likely won’t really notice it.Think of it like this: you set your alarm for 7am, knowing you have an early meeting in the morning. While you are sleeping, the meeting is cancelled due to an emergency. Your phone relays this to your alarm clock, which automatically changes your alarm back to its normal time, based on your altered calendar. However, it adds a 10 minute allowance because it is connected to your car, which has transmitted that the tank is almost empty. Later, while you are at work, you receive notifications on your phone telling you that the bathroom soap dispenser is running low, you’re out of milk, and your laundry hamper is now at capacity – because they all have sensors and basic transmitters. As of 2008, the number of connected “things” exceeded the number of people on Earth; by 2020, there will be 50 Billion. As this web of connection spreads literally everything will seem connected – and this is why the Internet of Things is also referred to as “pervasive computing” and “ubiquitous computing”.
  • So, there you have it – 10 trends in social and digital media!
  • That wasn’t so bad, now was it – and now that crazy diagram makes a whole lot more sense. Hopefully it helps you see the bigger picture and, most of all, understand better the “why” behind the very basic steps of setting up a Twitter of Linkedin account – why are those services so popular, why are they important, and what else is important in the area of digital too.

10 Trends in Social and Digital Media 10 Trends in Social and Digital Media Presentation Transcript

  • Trends in Social and Digital Media Mario Vasilescu | 03/18/2013 Copyright Mario Vasilescu 2013 | let’s connect: mvas.ca/connect
  • Copyright Mario Vasilescu 2013 | let’s connect: mvas.ca/connect WHO AM I? WHAT AM I DOING HERE? • Mario • Canadian (Toronto) • Winner of Focus 2040 • BPI Institute for Leadership • Co-Founder of www.rewordly.com (startup)
  • NOT HOW, BUT WHY • NOT a presentation on using Linkedin, or setting up Twitter… • Today is about giving you the bigger picture about the digital ecosystem. Copyright Mario Vasilescu 2013 | let’s connect: mvas.ca/connect BEGINNER INTERMEDIATE ~EXPERT before after TODAY’S PRESENTATION
  • NOT HOW, BUT WHY if you want the basics (a quick reminder): Facebook = what you’re doing Twitter = what you’re thinking Instagram = what you’re looking at Linkedin/Viadeo = what you’re doing professionally Pinterest = what you’re looking at online Snapchat/Vine = what you’re looking at in the moment Quora = what your opinion is Foursquare = where you are Yelp = what you think about what you did Wordpress/Blogger/Tumblr* = what you think, extended. Copyright Mario Vasilescu 2013 | let’s connect: mvas.ca/connect
  • NOT HOW, BUT WHY • NOT a presentation on using Linkedin, or setting up Twitter… • I’m not going to waste your time on the basics, but try to give you context. • I’m going to summarize the current ecosystem of the digital, connected world, through 10 trends. Copyright Mario Vasilescu 2013 | let’s connect: mvas.ca/connect
  • 10 TRENDS IN SOCIAL AND DIGITAL MEDIA: Trends in Social Content: 1. Creation 2. Curation Trends in engagement: 3. Gamification 4. Web 2.0/User-centric Design Trends in convenience: 5. “The Cloud” 6. Privacy + Security Trends in analysis: 7. “Big Data” 8. Analytics (the Data Scientist) Trends in digital reality: 9. Augmented Reality 10. “The Internet of Things” Copyright Mario Vasilescu 2013 | let’s connect: mvas.ca/connect
  • WHY ARE THESE TRENDS IMPORTANT • Some already define how you interact with the world, some are going to further transform how you interact with the world. • Companies will need to master them to remain competitive. -> being familiar with them makes you more valuable/competitive. Copyright Mario Vasilescu 2013 | let’s connect: mvas.ca/connect
  • THESE ARE THE 10 TRENDS. (there will be a test at the end) Copyright Mario Vasilescu 2013 | let’s connect: mvas.ca/connect
  • IT ALL BEGINS WITH YOU… Copyright Mario Vasilescu 2013 | let’s connect: mvas.ca/connect
  • THE INTERNET = AN EXTENSION OF YOU Copyright Mario Vasilescu 2013 | let’s connect: mvas.ca/connect
  • WITH SOCIAL MEDIA, INTERNET = VIRTUAL YOU Copyright Mario Vasilescu 2013 | let’s connect: mvas.ca/connect
  • WITH SOCIAL MEDIA, INTERNET = VIRTUAL YOU Copyright Mario Vasilescu 2013 | let’s connect: mvas.ca/connect Your slice of the Interest Graph Your slice of the Knowledge Graph Your slice of the Social Graph
  • NOT AN OPTION. PARTICIPATE OR DON’T COMPETE. Copyright Mario Vasilescu 2013 | let’s connect: mvas.ca/connect
  • SOCIAL MEDIA • Social Media is social. • It relies on direct conversation, but especially on indirect communication; direct dialogue -> reactive dialogue • To create the spark or good impression, need content • “2013 = The Year of Content” / “Content is King” Copyright Mario Vasilescu 2013 | let’s connect: mvas.ca/connect
  • 10 TRENDS IN SOCIAL AND DIGITAL MEDIA: Trends in Social Content: 1. Creation 2. Curation Trends in engagement: 3. Gamification 4. Web 2.0/User-centric Design Trends in convenience: 5. “The Cloud” 6. Privacy + Security Trends in analysis: 7. “Big Data” 8. Analytics (the Data Scientist) Trends in digital reality: 9. Augmented Reality 10. “The Internet of Things” Copyright Mario Vasilescu 2013 | let’s connect: mvas.ca/connect
  • TRENDS #1, #2: CONTENT CREATION & CURATION CREATION & CURATION Copyright Mario Vasilescu 2013 | let’s connect: mvas.ca/connect
  • • CREATION = producing new, original content, authored by you • CURATION = collecting your favourite items, presenting/sharing your collections. TRENDS #1, #2: CONTENT CREATION & CURATION Copyright Mario Vasilescu 2013 | let’s connect: mvas.ca/connect
  • TRENDS #1, #2: CONTENT CREATION & CURATION Copyright Mario Vasilescu 2013 | let’s connect: mvas.ca/connect
  • 10 TRENDS IN SOCIAL AND DIGITAL MEDIA: Trends in Social Content: 1. Creation 2. Curation Trends in engagement: 3. Gamification 4. Web 2.0/User-centric Design Trends in convenience: 5. “The Cloud” 6. Privacy + Security Trends in analysis: 7. “Big Data” 8. Analytics (the Data Scientist) Trends in digital reality: 9. Augmented Reality 10. “The Internet of Things” Copyright Mario Vasilescu 2013 | let’s connect: mvas.ca/connect
  • TRENDS #3, #4: GAMIFICATION, WEB 2.0 DESIGN Copyright Mario Vasilescu 2013 | let’s connect: mvas.ca/connect
  • TRENDS #3, #4: GAMIFICATION, WEB 2.0 DESIGN Copyright Mario Vasilescu 2013 | let’s connect: mvas.ca/connect
  • TRENDS #3, #4: GAMIFICATION, WEB 2.0 DESIGN Thetechnologyparadox.wordpress.com Copyright Mario Vasilescu 2013 | let’s connect: mvas.ca/connect
  • 10 TRENDS IN SOCIAL AND DIGITAL MEDIA: Trends in Social Content: 1. Creation 2. Curation Trends in engagement: 3. Gamification 4. Web 2.0/User-centric Design Trends in convenience: 5. “The Cloud” 6. Privacy + Security Trends in analysis: 7. “Big Data” 8. Analytics (the Data Scientist) Trends in digital reality: 9. Augmented Reality 10. “The Internet of Things” Copyright Mario Vasilescu 2013 | let’s connect: mvas.ca/connect
  • TRENDS #5, #6: “THE CLOUD”, PRIVACY/SECURITY Copyright Mario Vasilescu 2013 | let’s connect: mvas.ca/connect
  • TRENDS #5, #6: “THE CLOUD”, PRIVACY/SECURITY Copyright Mario Vasilescu 2013 | let’s connect: mvas.ca/connect
  • TRENDS #5, #6: “THE CLOUD”, PRIVACY/SECURITY Copyright Mario Vasilescu 2013 | let’s connect: mvas.ca/connect BEFORE NOW SINGLE PERSONAL HARDWARE = DATA SOURCE DEVICES CONNECTIONS ACCOUNTS DATA SOURCE (CLOUD) CONNECTIONS
  • TRENDS #5, #6: “THE CLOUD”, PRIVACY/SECURITY Copyright Mario Vasilescu 2013 | let’s connect: mvas.ca/connect
  • TRENDS #5, #6: “THE CLOUD”, PRIVACY/SECURITY Copyright Mario Vasilescu 2013 | let’s connect: mvas.ca/connect
  • 10 TRENDS IN SOCIAL AND DIGITAL MEDIA: Trends in Social Content: 1. Creation 2. Curation Trends in engagement: 3. Gamification 4. Web 2.0/User-centric Design Trends in convenience: 5. “The Cloud” 6. Privacy + Security Trends in analysis: 7. “Big Data” 8. Analytics (the Data Scientist) Trends in digital reality: 9. Augmented Reality 10. “The Internet of Things” Copyright Mario Vasilescu 2013 | let’s connect: mvas.ca/connect
  • TRENDS #7, #8: “BIG DATA”, ANALYTICS Copyright Mario Vasilescu 2013 | let’s connect: mvas.ca/connect ( = DATA ) EXPLICIT + IMPLICIT
  • (1 Zettabyte = 1 trillion GB) TRENDS #7, #8: “BIG DATA”, ANALYTICS Copyright Mario Vasilescu 2013 | let’s connect: mvas.ca/connect
  • 10 TRENDS IN SOCIAL AND DIGITAL MEDIA: Trends in Social Content: 1. Creation 2. Curation Trends in engagement: 3. Gamification 4. Web 2.0/User-centric Design Trends in convenience: 5. “The Cloud” 6. Privacy + Security Trends in analysis: 7. “Big Data” 8. Analytics (the Data Scientist) Trends in digital reality: 9. Augmented Reality 10. “The Internet of Things” Copyright Mario Vasilescu 2013 | let’s connect: mvas.ca/connect
  • TRENDS #9, #10: AR TECH, “The Internet of Things” Copyright Mario Vasilescu 2013 | let’s connect: mvas.ca/connect
  • TRENDS #9, #10: AR TECH, “The Internet of Things” Copyright Mario Vasilescu 2013 | let’s connect: mvas.ca/connect
  • TRENDS #9, #10: AR TECH, “The Internet of Things” Copyright Mario Vasilescu 2013 | let’s connect: mvas.ca/connect
  • TRENDS #9, #10: AR TECH, “The Internet of Things” Copyright Mario Vasilescu 2013 | let’s connect: mvas.ca/connect AKA “pervasive computing”, “ubiquitous computing”
  • 10 TRENDS IN SOCIAL AND DIGITAL MEDIA: Trends in Social Content: 1. Creation 2. Curation Trends in engagement: 3. Gamification 4. Web 2.0/User-centric Design Trends in convenience: 5. “The Cloud” 6. Privacy + Security Trends in analysis: 7. “Big Data” 8. Analytics (the Data Scientist) Trends in digital reality: 9. Augmented Reality 10. “The Internet of Things” Copyright Mario Vasilescu 2013 | let’s connect: mvas.ca/connect
  • Copyright Mario Vasilescu 2013 | let’s connect: mvas.ca/connect ( = DATA ) EXPLICIT + IMPLICIT
  • BONUSES YOU SHOULD INVESTIGATE: Copyright Mario Vasilescu 2013 | let’s connect: mvas.ca/connect Mostly hardware, but will also transform our world + open up new business opportunities… • 3D Printing/Maker Revolution • Airware • Smart devices for all (via <$40 computers) – universal access • Redefinition of higher education through MOOC • Quantum Computing • Cognitive computing • DNA storage • Gesture/mind-controlled devices • Smart grids (related to pervasive computing) • Cyber warfare • Content automation (minimal input in having an online “presence”)
  • CONCLUSIONS • The digital world is expanding • It is becoming equal with the real world, and so it is important to be aware of it • It is valuable and a competitive advantage to understand the digital ecosystem and these trends. • Thank you! www.mvas.ca/connect to connect with me. Copyright Mario Vasilescu 2013 | let’s connect: mvas.ca/connect
  • Trends in Social and Digital Media Mario Vasilescu | 03/18/2013 Copyright Mario Vasilescu 2013 | let’s connect: mvas.ca/connect -»