i Masterclasses episode 2 Learning Goals part 2

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What are 'SMART Learning Goals? We share the 'SMART Goals' template. This session shows in detail how PLTs can work together effectively to get SMART Goals happening in every classroom.

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  • Metacognitive skills We all know that the motivation and efficiency of students has indicated that students who set their own working goals tend to achieve more than when working on goals set for them by the teacher. Students who set their own learning goals have more confidence to take on more challenging tasks, regardless of their ability. Their motivation to improve and master a task is improved and their self-esteem remains strong, even in the case of failure. When students are assisted to delve into their own thinking and learning processes, they are drawn to think about the effectiveness of the strategies they used to achieve the learning goals they set. Planning what to do, monitoring progress towards achieving it and evaluating the outcome can help students take more control over their thinking and learning processes and equip them with learning to learn skills. Developing, monitoring and reporting on personal learning goals DEECD Nov 2006
  • In the case of generic learning and behaviour skills there are a variety of frameworks that can be used: Habits of Mind, You Can Do it, Multiple Intelligences and social competencies
  • the process is ongoing and cyclical developing, monitoring and reporting on learning goals will generally work best when the process is clear and common across the school. The process of developing, monitoring and reporting on a student’s personal learning goals involves conversations about learning between the student and the teacher. Planning for such conversations to occur in a productive and purposeful manner is at the core of this process. These conversations should be carried out in a spirit of openness and cooperation and should allow for student diversity. Developing, monitoring and reporting on personal learning goals DEECD Nov 2006
  • Personal learning goals at the centre of student learning. Personal learning goals are an integral component of the Victorian Essential Learning Standards (VELS). Underpinning the VELS is the notion that students need to develop three broad capacities: the capacity to manage themselves as individuals and in relation to others the capacity to understand the world in which they live the capacity to act effectively in that world. The process of developing, monitoring and reporting on personal learning goals is integral to all domains and helps students achieve standards across the domains, but in particular there is a close connection between this process and the personal learning domain. This domain is about supporting the development of autonomous learners with a positive sense of themselves as learners who can ‘increasingly manage their own learning and growth by monitoring their learning, and setting and reflecting on their learning goals’ (Victorian Essential Learning Standards 2005). Developing, monitoring and reporting on personal learning goals DEECD Nov 2006
  • Where do they come from??? Sentence stems to support goal creation, goals should be modelled
  • To set a specific goal you must answer the six "W" questions: Specific Who:  Who is involved? What: What do I want to accomplish? Where: Identify a location When:  Establish a time frame Which: Identify requirements and constraints Why:  Specific reasons, purpose or benefits of accomplishing the goal, could relate to a VELS progression point. Example: I would like to be better at …. because ……. Measureable To determine if your goal is measurable , ask questions such as...... How much? How many? How will I know when it is accomplished? Example: I know I will have achieved my goal when I ….. I will know that I am improving when …..
  • Actions Your goal should be set by you rather than by someone else. You know your strengths and weaknesses and can use this information to maximise your chance of success. Example: I can achieve my goal by ….. (outline your strategy)   Realistic Don’t plan to do things if you are unlikely to follow through. Better to plan only a few things and be successful than to plan many and be unsuccessful. Success breeds success! Start small, with what you can do, experience the joys of meeting your goal, and then increase the amount of challenge you give yourself. Example: I can seek help from ….. I will aim to complete by … then (set short term successes) The first thing I can do is ….. the second thing I can to is … Timely A goal should be grounded within a time frame. With no time frame tied to it there's no sense of urgency. Example: I will achieve my goal by …..(set milestone dates) I will achieve my goal by …..(set an end date)
  • Model goal-setting by setting Class Goals and displaying them in the classroom. Review the class progress against meeting the goal; Template is there as a prompt we don’t write in it ‘ I will improve my maths’ ‘ I will read more.’ Actions Your goal should be set by you rather than by someone else. You know your strengths and weaknesses and can use this information to maximise your chance of success. Eg: I can achieve my goal by ….. (outline your strategy)   Realistic Don’t plan to do things if you are unlikely to follow through. Better to plan only a few things and be successful than to plan many and be unsuccessful. Success breeds success! Start small, with what you can do, experience the joys of meeting your goal, and then increase the amount of challenge you give yourself. Example: I can seek help from ….. I will aim to complete by … then (set short term successes) The first thing I can do is ….. the second thing I can to is … Timely A goal should be grounded within a time frame. With no time frame tied to it there's no sense of urgency. Example: I will achieve my goal by …..(set milestone dates) I will achieve my goal by …..(set an end date) Actions Your goal should be set by you rather than by someone else. You know your strengths and weaknesses and can use this information to maximise your chance of success. Example: I can achieve my goal by ….. (outline your strategy)   Realistic Don’t plan to do things if you are unlikely to follow through. Better to plan only a few things and be successful than to plan many and be unsuccessful. Success breeds success! Start small, with what you can do, experience the joys of meeting your goal, and then increase the amount of challenge you give yourself. Example: I can seek help from ….. I will aim to complete by … then (set short term successes) The first thing I can do is ….. the second thing I can to is … Timely A goal should be grounded within a time frame. With no time frame tied to it there's no sense of urgency. Example: I will achieve my goal by …..(set milestone dates) I will achieve my goal by …..(set an end date)
  • Link to DEECD Student Reports Personal Learning Goals – this is in iMasterclass Design Space http://www.education.vic.gov.au/studentlearning/studentreports/schools/personalgoals/suppdevplg.htm http://www.eduweb.vic.gov.au/edulibrary/public/teachlearn/student/learninggoalsexamples.pdf Sentence stems linked to VELS domains –need SMARTING DEECD Student Reports Personal Learning goals has a link to Examples of learning goals linked to a range of domains of the Victorian Essential Learning Standards (levels 1 – 6) document. Also scroll down for more information: Self assessment strategies and tools from the Assessment Professional Learning modules Graphic organisers and other assessment tools availalble on the student learning website
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  • i Masterclasses episode 2 Learning Goals part 2

    1. 1. Welcome to iMasterclass-Episode 2Hume Region presents: Student Learning Goals – Part 2 Brendan OBrien, Gail Stanley and Libby Delbridge
    2. 2. Purpose of these SessionsThese online professional learning sessions will: Build a community of teacher/learners beyond your school Provide a framework for effective PLTs Develop an effective process for Student Goal Setting Provide confidence and skills in using Ultranet
    3. 3. The Learning Intention for today is...... How do my students create SMART learning goals The Success Criteria will include........6.I will be able to explain SMART learning goals and theirbenefits to my students and my colleagues7.I will learn how to model SMART goals3. I will be able to understand how a PLT can effectivelyuse the SMART goals framework to plan student goalsetting
    4. 4. In Episode 1 we learnt what are personal learning goals and why are they importantPersonal learning goals are about improvingstudents’ learning and achievement and buildingtheir capacity to learn. Students become activeparticipants in the learning process, empoweredto become independent learners, and motivatedto achieve their full potential.“Learning Goals and the Ultranet” DEECD January 2010
    5. 5. POLLAs part of the series of sequential PL did youparticipate in iMasterclasses Learning Goals part 1 last Thursday?
    6. 6. Where arewe from?
    7. 7. Poll-Whole School using an agreed framework to create Learning GoalsA. All our students use a framework to support them to create specific, measurable, action-based, realistic and timely goalsB. Some classes use a framework to support goal creationC. Students at risk use a framework to support goal creationD. No, ad hoc at best, some teachers only use a frameworkE. Just before report time, maybe, not at all
    8. 8. What frameworks have you used to support students to create goals?
    9. 9. Developing goals- Core conversations about learning between student and teacher• When developing learning goals, students need an understanding of their current knowledge and an understanding of what knowledge they need in order to improve.• What data is shared with your students?• Is there other data that could be shared with your students?
    10. 10. Using VELS standards to help goal setting?•The VELS are a good, discipline-based reference for describing achievements. Whilst thelanguage may not be accessible to younger students, they can be used, or paraphrased, todescribe specific goals. Interpreting VELS ‘standards’ with students (Assessment As Learning) isin itself a valuable exercise:• The goal ‘I will use several strategies to locate, select and record key information from texts’ (Level 3.0) is more specific than ‘I will read more.’• The goal ‘I will automatically recall multiplication facts up to 10 x 10’ (Level 3.0) is more specific than ‘improve my maths’ or ‘learn my times tables.’•As teachers are required to assess students against the VELS, making the desired outcomesexplicit to students enables them to use them as learning goals.“Learning Goals and the Ultranet” DEECD January 2010 Could these goals be even better?????
    11. 11. SMART goals
    12. 12. SpecificTo set a specific goal you must answer the six "W" questions:Who: Who is involved?What: What do I want to accomplish?Where: Identify a locationWhen: Establish a time frameWhich: Identify requirements and constraintsWhy: Specific reasons, purpose or benefits of accomplishing the goal, could relate to a VELSprogression point.Example:I would like to be better at …. because …….MeasureableTo determine if your goal is measurable, ask questions such as......How much?How many?How will I know when it is accomplished?Example:I know I will have achieved my goal when I …..I will know that I am improving when …..
    13. 13. Actions•Your goal should be set by you rather than by someone else.•You know your strengths and weaknesses and can use this information to maximise your chance ofsuccess.Example:•I can achieve my goal by ….. (outline your strategy)Realistic•Don’t plan to do things if you are unlikely to follow through. Better to plan only a few things and besuccessful than to plan many and be unsuccessful. Success breeds success!•Start small, with what you can do, experience the joys of meeting your goal, and then increase theamount of challenge you give yourself.Example:•I can seek help from …..•I will aim to complete by … then (set short term successes)•The first thing I can do is ….. the second thing I can to is …Timely•A goal should be grounded within a time frame.•With no time frame tied to it theres no sense of urgency.Example:•I will achieve my goal by …..(set milestone dates)•I will achieve my goal by …..(set an end date)
    14. 14. Let’s watch a 2 minute video to see how PLTs might plan to support students to create SMARTGoalsvia Web Tour Please press PLAYFUSE LINK: yourselfhttps://fuse.education.vic.gov.au/THEN ENTER FUSE ID 9CPZBJ
    15. 15. Response to the VideoPut your hand up to grab the microphonee)What did you learn about SMART goals?g)How can the PLT benefit teachers to supportstudents to create SMART goals?
    16. 16. What about modelling a ClassSMART goal?Let’s try making a SMART goal now?‘I will improve my maths’ or I will read more’
    17. 17. Possible starting points for creating SMART learning goals linked to VELSDEECD StudentReports-PersonalLearning Goalswebsite
    18. 18. How to join iMasterclasses Design space...• Join the Hume Region iMasterclass Design Space• Go to Design Spaces• Click Available Spaces tab• Search by Space ID number (139211104)• The space is Open access so click the Actions box and Join• After you have joined click on the title to open the space
    19. 19. In Episode 3…•Make SMART Goals available to students, teacher andparents 24/7..•Share how students put their SMART Goals into UltranetWikis•Link students short-term SMART Goals to Student digitalportfolios in Ultranet
    20. 20. How are you feeling about using SMART goals in the classroom?
    21. 21. Open microphone/Questions
    22. 22. Thank You!•Libby Delbridgedelbridge.elizabeth.n@edumail.vic.gov.au•Brendan O’Brien @brendanoobrien.brendan.p@edumail.vic.gov.au•Gail Stanleystanley.gail.d@edumail.vic.gov.au

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