Cox S Model A

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  • Thank you for taking time from your busy schedules to be here. Special thanks to Cheryl and WSPM for structuring this practice presentation. The main goal of the 2010 Hawaii International Conference on Education is to provide an opportunity for academicians and professionals from various education related fields from all over the world to come together and learn from each other. An additional goal of the conference is to provide a place for academicians and professionals with cross-disciplinary interests related to education to meet and interact with members inside and outside their own particular disciplines. This will by my first conference presentation.
  • Due to the economic downturn, my application was put on hold.
  • Background of the problem Supporting
  • Why is diversity important factor to consider? This evolution has altered the way most companies, large and small, conduct business: causing organizational leaders to seek solutions that attract and retain diverse talent (Ivancevich & Gilbert, 2000).
  • I started to just talk to different people about their thoughts… (in truth I had no idea where to start) What I did notice was that there was such a mixed response But the three main dialogues I did notice was the Diversity is about Government mandates (often associated with Affirmative Action and EEOC) Social Responsibility – “Act against prejudices and discrimination” Then I heard Business Imperative --- that that is the direction I wanted to focus my study Combined with my expereince with (OHI) and the curiosity to explore their diversity training and clear about approaching my study from Business I was able to develop my research questions.
  • When identifying individual diversity, it is suggested to distinguish between the primary and secondary dimensions. primary dimensions are inborn such as age, ethnicity, gender, Secondary dimensions contain elements of control and are things that can be changed such as: educational background, geographic location, income, marital status, military experience, parental status, religious belief and work experience. Thomas and Ely (1996) wrote an article entitled, Making Differences Matter: A New Paradigm for Managing Diversity , a research focused on the influence a diverse group of individuals can make on organizational effectiveness. Discrimination and Fairness Paradigm is one of the main diversity theories in practice today and resembles affirmative-action efforts - ignore all of those differences in the name of fairness. Access and Legitimacy Paradigm has led to new specialized and managerial opportunities for underrepresented groups. It has also increased competitive advantage in culturally dominant communities, but under this paradigm employees are sometimes pigeonholed in certain markets where they may feel exploited and closed to other opportunities in the organization. Cultural difference is emphasized within certain conditions but the skills, beliefs and practices that are unique are not identified or integrated to create a learning opportunities into the larger organization . third paradigm, Learning-and-Effectiveness, incorporates aspects of the first two but goes beyond by connecting diversity to learning opportunities at work. Employee’s perspectives are integrated into rethinking primary tasks and redefining business practices. Diversity related efforts should be aligned with key business goals (SHRM, 2008). ) in 2007 conducted the largest and most comprehensive study on the state of workplace diversity management in the U.S. Desire of companies to expand into the global market. Economic growth of Asia. Continued acceleration of global change. Stricter cross-border policies for global business settings. Cross-cultural understanding/savvy in business settings. Growing economic interdependence among the world’s countries. Increased off-shoring. Heightened awareness of cultural differences. Pressure for development of global labor standards. Increased security for expatriates aboard.
  • Strategies for Diversity Management: Dass and Parker in Strategies for Managing Human Resource Diversity: From Resistance to Learning (1999) have identified strategic responses for managing workforce diversity expanding on Thomas and Ely’s diversity paradigm. Considering global realities, business success will require long range strategic plan that is supported by top management with collaborative participation from all employees to implement diversity in order to capitalize on the “interaction between, and collaboration among, people of diverse cultures, religion, histories, and perspectives” (SHRM, 2008). Taylor H. Cox, Jr. is an associate professor in the Organization Behavior and Human Resource Management Department of the University of Michigan Business School, where he teaches courses on organizational consulting and managing diversity. Cox (2001) states that, well-managed diversity can add value to an organization by (1) improving problem solving, (2) increasing creativity and innovation, (3) allowing for organizational flexibility, (4) improving the quality of personnel through better recruitment and retention and (5) using effective marketing strategies, especially for organizations that sell products or services. Diversity impacts the ability to achieve organizational goals and influences the attitudes of employees (2001). Research also reveals that corporations which have responded to issues of diversity by implementing a strategic plan have recruited and retained a diverse workforce.
  • Conceptual Framework Cox’s Change Model for Work on Diversity has five components: (1) leadership, (2) research & measurement, (3) education, (4) alignment of management systems, and (5) follow- up. This presentation will focus on the role education played in helping an organization transform from a corporation, which was criticized for its lack of diversity into one, which was lauded and received numerous awards.
  • For this case study, one organization in the hospitality industry (OHI) was selected to explore how diversity initiatives were instituted and implemented during a period of time between 2000 and 2009 . Under the scrutiny of several black leaders and members of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored Persons (NAACP), in 2000 OHI was targeted for boycotts and demonstrations that questioned the company’s hiring practices and hostile environment. The boycott originated from claims of discrimination. Several former workers criticized employment policies and recounted racial insults and unfair treatment leading to fourteen discrimination lawsuits. In May 2000, the OHI’s CEO declared diversity as a moral business imperative and made a commitment to developing a corporate infrastructure to drive its implementation within the company. Critical Incident Technique (CIT) was used to gather data regarding actual incidents of success and failure to determine the specific behaviors that led to positive or negative results” (Hettlage & Steinlin, 2006, p. 4). is a (reading/memoing)Become familiar with the data and identify potential themes (describing)Examine the data in depth to provide detailed description of the setting, participants and activity (classifying)Categorize and code pieces of data and grouping them into themes. Archival records may be relevant for many case studies [Press Release, articles, Company website, Annual Diversity Report 2002-2007, and 2008 Diversity Strategic Plan] As of April of 2009, OHI has been honored with more than one hundred and thirty-five awards related to diversity including DiversityInc.’s Top 50 Companies of Diversity. Organizations which receive this award are selected from an objective process that tracks various benchmarks which measure an organization’s culture. Companies must demonstrate consistent strengths in four key areas: CEO commitment, human capital, corporate and organizational communications and supplier diversity. Each company is assessed within the context of their industry and employee skill sets (DiversityInc., 2009, March 13).
  • identified their perceptions of the influential factors that supported effective organizational change for instituting diversity initiatives. Key factors includes: leadership commitment, corporate values, education, communication, and organizational infrastructure. During the process of analyzing secondary data as well as Interviews with two key executive members of the Diversity Council, I found similar characteristics to Cox’s model in many of the interviewee’s key comments Their diversity workshop created an environment of continuous learning that allowed the organization to benefit from the life experiences and wisdom of the many thousands of their employees. The basic principles of universal respect for people, inclusion, and appreciation for the contributions of every individual are not only the bedrock moral precepts, but are the key to unlocking each employees’ individual and collective potential to improve and excel (organization website, 2009).
  • The result of institutional diversity practices, policies and procedures is that “diversity is so imbedded in our culture now, we don’t have to incentivize people to embrace the work” (Interviewee B). In August 2002, the organization of study launched the Diversity Champion Training. This training is the centerpiece of their success. [Interviewee A: Diversity Champion Training is part leadership, part personal breakthrough, part diversity…So we are making this monster investment in giving our people the permission and the setting in which they can be better human beings…property presidents…every director and above…every manager and above, in this company, has attended. We’ve had six thousand people go through it, twenty-five people at a time.] [Interviewee B: This is an intense, experiential program that creates an emotional and intellectual connection to the practice of diversity and influences how people regard diversity from the business perspective. The emotional connection enables them to be proactive within the company and to have empathy for others who may be different from them. The training helps lay the foundation of the company's culture. …to harness the energy and power of diversity…with six thousand people who are the leaders of the corporation. We became better positioned to win awards…employees coming together to consider how they could impact the success of the business in more substantive ways.  Most employees understand that there is a direct connection to their individual success and the success of the enterprise.]
  • The Diversity Champion Workshop has created an environment to learn and benefit from the many disciplines, life experiences, and wisdom of the many thousands of employees of MGM MIRAGE and its hotels and casinos. The basic principles of universal respect for people, inclusion, and appreciation of the contribution of every individual are not only bedrock moral precepts, but are the key to unlocking each employees individual and collective potential to improve and excel.
  • The result of institutional diversity practices, policies and procedures is that “diversity is so imbedded in our culture now, we don’t have to incentivize people to embrace the work” (Interviewee B). In August 2002, the organization of study launched the Diversity Champion Training. This training is the centerpiece of their success. [Interviewee A: Diversity Champion Training is part leadership, part personal breakthrough, part diversity…So we are making this monster investment in giving our people the permission and the setting in which they can be better human beings…property presidents…every director and above…every manager and above, in this company, has attended. We’ve had six thousand people go through it, twenty-five people at a time.] [Interviewee B: This is an intense, experiential program that creates an emotional and intellectual connection to the practice of diversity and influences how people regard diversity from the business perspective. The emotional connection enables them to be proactive within the company and to have empathy for others who may be different from them. The training helps lay the foundation of the company's culture. …to harness the energy and power of diversity…with six thousand people who are the leaders of the corporation. We became better positioned to win awards…employees coming together to consider how they could impact the success of the business in more substantive ways.  Most employees understand that there is a direct connection to their individual success and the success of the enterprise.]
  • “ top-to-bottom diversity effort …The goal was to increase diversity at every level from employees and from suppliers” In May 2008 OHI graduates its 6000th Diversity Champion out 66,000 employees Diversity Training Program, an industry-training first, that fuses leadership, diversity and professional development during three days of intense classroom instruction to become "Diversity Champions“ The value, importance, and impact on business of effectively managing a diverse workforce. Teaching employees to recognize the impact of their own reactions to diversity situations and the learning behaviors that are critical to successfully managing diversity at MGM MIRAGE. Practicing behaviors that encourage inclusion in the workplace which promotes teamwork, innovation, creativity, and productivity. Recognizing challenges to valuing diversity at MGM MIRAGE and implement prevention and intervention measures that address these situations. According to the CEO of OHI – “Our premise is simple: an organization that values the contributions of all people will derive the contributions of its entire workforce."
  • Interview with Senior executives and members of the Diversity Council It speaks about our interconnectedness. The concept of ubuntu is used in the political sphere to emphasize the need for unity or consensus in decision-making, as well as the need for a suitably humanitarian ethic to inform those decisions. So when I encounter you I would say very literally, I would say, Sawa Bona . And that translates into, I see you. The response, your response would be, Sikhona , which equally literally translates into, therefore I am here. …the fundamental premise is, it is through the act of seeing you that I begin, that I can bring all of your talent, all of your gifts, all of your value to bear…And that’s what we are working very doggedly to create, is an environment in which a hundred percent of our people hear and feel sawa bona , every day. The Diversity Champion Workshop has created an environment to learn and benefit from the many disciplines, life experiences, and wisdom of the many thousands of employees of MGM MIRAGE and its hotels and casinos. The basic principles of universal respect for people, inclusion, and appreciation of the contribution of every individual are not only bedrock moral precepts, but are the key to unlocking each employees individual and collective potential to improve and excel.
  • West expanded the company's Diversity Champion training program to target 350 of the resort's 2,800 employees. Although the training was mandatory for managers and senior leaders, West wanted it to reach as far down as front-line employees. In conjunction with other efforts, such as better communication with workers, West used diversity training to raise employee morale and customer satisfaction.   "The business results improved, the turnover rate [dropped], and the degree of employee engagement ... in the community became much greater than we had seen before," recalls Mathur.   "Really focusing on creating a culture for people in which they can be fulfilled, engaged and valued ... then you see huge benefits across all the measures," adds Mathur. "Diversity is very, very critical to creating such a culture."   For its diversity training, MGM MIRAGE hires Guardian Quest, a minority-owned firm that implemented the Diversity Champions training program in 2002. "The ultimate goal is not just to have people be aware or celebrate diversity, but to become diversity advocates," says Michael Nila, who along with Ondra Berry cofounded Guardian Quest. Nila is Latino and Berry is black.   MGM MIRAGE has used its diversity training to create an environment where the company's managers and top leaders learn to value differences inside and outside the office. The exercises, including one that has a group of managers wearing blindfolds and entrusting their safety to others, force the participants to become interdependent to accomplish goals. The training also conveys the message that trust should trump any preconceptions or misconceptions that hold back or dilute a company's diverse work-force talents. In May 2008 OHI graduates its 6000th Diversity Champion Diversity Training Program, an industry-training first, that fuses leadership, diversity and professional development during three days of intense classroom instruction to become "Diversity Champions“ The value, importance, and impact on business of effectively managing a diverse workforce. Teaching employees to recognize the impact of their own reactions to diversity situations and the learning behaviors that are critical to successfully managing diversity at MGM MIRAGE. Practicing behaviors that encourage inclusion in the workplace which promotes teamwork, innovation, creativity, and productivity. Recognizing challenges to valuing diversity at MGM MIRAGE and implement prevention and intervention measures that address these situations. According to the CEO of OHI – “Our premise is simple: an organization that values the contributions of all people will derive the contributions of its entire workforce."
  • West expanded the company's Diversity Champion training program to target 350 of the resort's 2,800 employees. Although the training was mandatory for managers and senior leaders, West wanted it to reach as far down as front-line employees. In conjunction with other efforts, such as better communication with workers, West used diversity training to raise employee morale and customer satisfaction.   "The business results improved, the turnover rate [dropped], and the degree of employee engagement ... in the community became much greater than we had seen before," recalls Mathur.   "Really focusing on creating a culture for people in which they can be fulfilled, engaged and valued ... then you see huge benefits across all the measures," adds Mathur. "Diversity is very, very critical to creating such a culture."   For its diversity training, MGM MIRAGE hires Guardian Quest, a minority-owned firm that implemented the Diversity Champions training program in 2002. "The ultimate goal is not just to have people be aware or celebrate diversity, but to become diversity advocates," says Michael Nila, who along with Ondra Berry cofounded Guardian Quest. Nila is Latino and Berry is black.   MGM MIRAGE has used its diversity training to create an environment where the company's managers and top leaders learn to value differences inside and outside the office. The exercises, including one that has a group of managers wearing blindfolds and entrusting their safety to others, force the participants to become interdependent to accomplish goals. The training also conveys the message that trust should trump any preconceptions or misconceptions that hold back or dilute a company's diverse work-force talents. In May 2008 OHI graduates its 6000th Diversity Champion Diversity Training Program, an industry-training first, that fuses leadership, diversity and professional development during three days of intense classroom instruction to become "Diversity Champions“ The value, importance, and impact on business of effectively managing a diverse workforce. Teaching employees to recognize the impact of their own reactions to diversity situations and the learning behaviors that are critical to successfully managing diversity at MGM MIRAGE. Practicing behaviors that encourage inclusion in the workplace which promotes teamwork, innovation, creativity, and productivity. Recognizing challenges to valuing diversity at MGM MIRAGE and implement prevention and intervention measures that address these situations. According to the CEO of OHI – “Our premise is simple: an organization that values the contributions of all people will derive the contributions of its entire workforce."
  • West expanded the company's Diversity Champion training program to target 350 of the resort's 2,800 employees. Although the training was mandatory for managers and senior leaders, West wanted it to reach as far down as front-line employees. In conjunction with other efforts, such as better communication with workers, West used diversity training to raise employee morale and customer satisfaction.   "The business results improved, the turnover rate [dropped], and the degree of employee engagement ... in the community became much greater than we had seen before," recalls Mathur.   "Really focusing on creating a culture for people in which they can be fulfilled, engaged and valued ... then you see huge benefits across all the measures," adds Mathur. "Diversity is very, very critical to creating such a culture."   For its diversity training, MGM MIRAGE hires Guardian Quest, a minority-owned firm that implemented the Diversity Champions training program in 2002. "The ultimate goal is not just to have people be aware or celebrate diversity, but to become diversity advocates," says Michael Nila, who along with Ondra Berry cofounded Guardian Quest. Nila is Latino and Berry is black.   MGM MIRAGE has used its diversity training to create an environment where the company's managers and top leaders learn to value differences inside and outside the office. The exercises, including one that has a group of managers wearing blindfolds and entrusting their safety to others, force the participants to become interdependent to accomplish goals. The training also conveys the message that trust should trump any preconceptions or misconceptions that hold back or dilute a company's diverse work-force talents. In May 2008 OHI graduates its 6000th Diversity Champion Diversity Training Program, an industry-training first, that fuses leadership, diversity and professional development during three days of intense classroom instruction to become "Diversity Champions“ The value, importance, and impact on business of effectively managing a diverse workforce. Teaching employees to recognize the impact of their own reactions to diversity situations and the learning behaviors that are critical to successfully managing diversity at MGM MIRAGE. Practicing behaviors that encourage inclusion in the workplace which promotes teamwork, innovation, creativity, and productivity. Recognizing challenges to valuing diversity at MGM MIRAGE and implement prevention and intervention measures that address these situations. According to the CEO of OHI – “Our premise is simple: an organization that values the contributions of all people will derive the contributions of its entire workforce."
  • West expanded the company's Diversity Champion training program to target 350 of the resort's 2,800 employees. Although the training was mandatory for managers and senior leaders, West wanted it to reach as far down as front-line employees. In conjunction with other efforts, such as better communication with workers, West used diversity training to raise employee morale and customer satisfaction.   "The business results improved, the turnover rate [dropped], and the degree of employee engagement ... in the community became much greater than we had seen before," recalls Mathur.   "Really focusing on creating a culture for people in which they can be fulfilled, engaged and valued ... then you see huge benefits across all the measures," adds Mathur. "Diversity is very, very critical to creating such a culture."   For its diversity training, MGM MIRAGE hires Guardian Quest, a minority-owned firm that implemented the Diversity Champions training program in 2002. "The ultimate goal is not just to have people be aware or celebrate diversity, but to become diversity advocates," says Michael Nila, who along with Ondra Berry cofounded Guardian Quest. Nila is Latino and Berry is black.   MGM MIRAGE has used its diversity training to create an environment where the company's managers and top leaders learn to value differences inside and outside the office. The exercises, including one that has a group of managers wearing blindfolds and entrusting their safety to others, force the participants to become interdependent to accomplish goals. The training also conveys the message that trust should trump any preconceptions or misconceptions that hold back or dilute a company's diverse work-force talents. In May 2008 OHI graduates its 6000th Diversity Champion Diversity Training Program, an industry-training first, that fuses leadership, diversity and professional development during three days of intense classroom instruction to become "Diversity Champions“ The value, importance, and impact on business of effectively managing a diverse workforce. Teaching employees to recognize the impact of their own reactions to diversity situations and the learning behaviors that are critical to successfully managing diversity at MGM MIRAGE. Practicing behaviors that encourage inclusion in the workplace which promotes teamwork, innovation, creativity, and productivity. Recognizing challenges to valuing diversity at MGM MIRAGE and implement prevention and intervention measures that address these situations. According to the CEO of OHI – “Our premise is simple: an organization that values the contributions of all people will derive the contributions of its entire workforce."
  • The findings of the study concluded that implementing a diversity strategy requires systems thinking and confirmed that diversity initiatives can be sustainable through various interventions and processes involving OD concepts. In addition, this study revealed that several components must be in place in order for diversity initiatives to be implemented and sustained. The researcher concluded that leadership commitment, corporate values, education, communication, accountability, and organizational infrastructure are essential and increases the chances of success. It also established that when diversity is approached as a business strategy and integrated into the fabric of the organization’s culture, diversity initiatives are more likely to be embraced at all levels of the company. Cox’s Change Model for Work on Diversity contains the essential elements and can be a useful tool to guide the development and implementation of diversity change efforts.
  • The findings of the study concluded that implementing a diversity strategy requires systems thinking and confirmed that diversity initiatives can be sustainable through various interventions and processes involving OD concepts. In addition, this study revealed that several components must be in place in order for diversity initiatives to be implemented and sustained. The researcher concluded that leadership commitment, corporate values, education, communication, accountability, and organizational infrastructure are essential and increases the chances of success. It also established that when diversity is approached as a business strategy and integrated into the fabric of the organization’s culture, diversity initiatives are more likely to be embraced at all levels of the company. Cox’s Change Model for Work on Diversity contains the essential elements and can be a useful tool to guide the development and implementation of diversity change efforts.
  • Cox S Model A

    1. 1. Education’s Role in an Organization’s Approach to Implementing a Culture of Diversity 8 th Annual Hawaii Int’l Conference on Education Aileen Zaballero January 7-10, 2010
    2. 2. I ntroduction <ul><li>B.S. in Workforce Education - UNLV </li></ul><ul><li>M.S. in Educational Leadership - UNLV </li></ul><ul><li>Facilitator and Product Specialist for Repario Ltd. a Professional Development Org. since 2006 </li></ul><ul><li>9 years in Training Field </li></ul><ul><li>2006 applied for Diversity Champion Trainer (inspiration for Master’s Thesis Study) </li></ul>
    3. 3. A genda Literature Review Conceptual Framework Research Methodology Findings pertaining to education Question Period 4 3 2 1 Background of Study 5 7
    4. 4. B ackground <ul><li>U.S. Census Bureau, state that by 2042 the single white-race population in the U.S is expected to become the minority (Bernstein & Edwards, 2008). </li></ul><ul><li>2030, nearly one in five U.S. residents is expected to be 65 years and older (Bernstein & Edwards, 2008). </li></ul>
    5. 5. B ackground <ul><li>Several studies show that “culturally diverse organizations outperform their more homogeneous counterparts” (Dansky, Weech-Maldonado, De Souza & Dreachslin, 2003, p.243). </li></ul><ul><li>However, the literature is still mixed about which strategies are most the successful for creating a just and inclusive culture in U.S. organizations. </li></ul>
    6. 6. B ackground Mandated Diversity Business Imperative Social Responsibility
    7. 7. P urpose of Study <ul><li>The purpose of this exploratory case study was: </li></ul><ul><li>to explore the perceived influential factors of effective organizational change for instituting diversity initiatives </li></ul><ul><li>to investigate the process of implementing diversity initiatives successfully in one hospitality organization. </li></ul>
    8. 8. L iterature R eview Key Topics Key Discoveries Diversity Defined (Loden & Rosener, 1991) <ul><li>Primary and Secondary Dimensions of Diversity </li></ul>Diversity Management (Thomas & Ely 1996) <ul><li>Discrimination and Fairness Paradigm </li></ul><ul><li>Access and Legitimacy Paradigm </li></ul><ul><li>Learning and Effectiveness Paradigm </li></ul>Business Case for Diversity (SHRM, 2007) <ul><li>Global trends to impact the workplace </li></ul>Strategies for Diversity Management (Dass & Parker, 1999) <ul><li>Episodic </li></ul><ul><li>Freestanding </li></ul><ul><li>Systematic </li></ul>Driving Cultural and Organizational Change (Cox, 1993, 2001) <ul><li>Cox’s Model for Work on Diversity </li></ul>
    9. 9. L iterature R eview Key Topics Key Discoveries Diversity Defined (Loden & Rosener, 1991) <ul><li>Primary and Secondary Dimensions of Diversity </li></ul>Diversity Management (Thomas & Ely 1996) <ul><li>Discrimination and Fairness Paradigm </li></ul><ul><li>Access and Legitimacy Paradigm </li></ul><ul><li>Learning and Effectiveness Paradigm </li></ul>Business Case for Diversity (SHRM, 2007) <ul><li>Global trends to impact the workplace </li></ul>Strategies for Diversity Management (Dass & Parker, 1999) <ul><li>Episodic </li></ul><ul><li>Freestanding </li></ul><ul><li>Systematic </li></ul>Driving Cultural and Organizational Change (Cox, 1993, 2001) <ul><li>Cox’s Model for Work on Diversity </li></ul>
    10. 10. C onceptual F ramework Leadership Cox’s Change Model for Work on Diversity Research & Measure-ment Education Alignment of Management Systems Follow-up
    11. 11. M ethodology
    12. 12. “ establish a direction and goal for change” (Cox, 2001) “ diversity isn’t a specific thing you do; it’s a value system that either is, or is not, woven in to every action.” (Interviewee A) Diversity Champion Training Responsible for governance and establishing policies to reflect Diversity Mission Transparency Accountability Partnership R esearch Q uestion 1: What are the perceived influential factors for effective organizational change for instituting diversity initiatives? Corporate Values Education Communication Infrastructure Leadership Commitment
    13. 13. R esearch Q uestion 2: What is the process of implementing diversity initiatives within the organization? Diversity Business Imperative Leadership Commitment <ul><ul><li>Strategic Planning Process </li></ul></ul>
    14. 14. E ducation <ul><li>Under the label of “diversity training,” studies show that only about one-third of diversity training efforts are viewed as creating a lasting result (Cox, 2001). </li></ul><ul><li>Yet education was instrumental to the success of the organization studied. </li></ul>
    15. 15. R esearch Q uestion 2: What is the process of implementing diversity initiatives within the organization? Diversity Business Imperative Leadership Commitment <ul><ul><li>Strategic Planning Process </li></ul></ul>
    16. 16. D iversity Training <ul><li>Core of OHI’s cultural transformation </li></ul><ul><li>3-day personal growth workshop </li></ul><ul><li>Principles of: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Diversity </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Leadership </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Personal accountability </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>The goal was to develop the company’s culture and harness the potential of every single employee no matter what his or her position was or may be. </li></ul>
    17. 17. E ducational P hilosophy <ul><li>Ubuntu- humanist philosophy “focusing on people’s allegiance and a sense of belonging to a great whole” (Interviewee A) </li></ul><ul><li>“ The basic principles of universal respect for people, inclusion, and appreciation of the contribution of every individual” (Interviewee B). </li></ul>
    18. 18. D elivery M ethod <ul><li>The class is taught using many methods including: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>lectures, </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>group activities, </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>role-playing, </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>journaling, </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>guest speakers, </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>videos, and </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>reading assignments.   </li></ul></ul></ul>
    19. 19. O bjective <ul><li>The value, importance, and impact on business of effectively managing a diverse workforce. </li></ul><ul><li>Teaching employees to recognize the impact of their own reactions to diversity situations and the learning behaviors that are critical to successfully managing diversity at OHI. </li></ul>
    20. 20. O bjective (Cont.) <ul><li>Practicing behaviors that encourage inclusion in the workplace which promotes teamwork, innovation, creativity, and productivity. </li></ul><ul><li>Recognizing challenges to </li></ul><ul><li>at OHI and implement prevention and intervention measures that address these situations. </li></ul>
    21. 21. B usiness R esults <ul><li>7000 graduates out of 65,000 </li></ul><ul><li>Increased employee morale and customer satisfaction </li></ul><ul><li>Improved turnover rates </li></ul><ul><li>Increased employee engagement </li></ul><ul><li>Create employees who not only celebrated diversity but are advocates of diversity </li></ul>
    22. 22. C onclusion <ul><li>This study confirmed that diversity initiatives can be sustainable through various interventions and processes involving OD concepts and requires systems thinking </li></ul><ul><li>When diversity is approached as a business strategy and integrated into the fabric of the organization’s culture, diversity initiatives are more likely to be embraced at all levels of the company. </li></ul>
    23. 23. C onclusion <ul><li>Cox’s Change Model for Work on Diversity contains the essential elements and can be a useful tool to guide the development and implementation of diversity change efforts. </li></ul>
    24. 24. Q uestions
    25. 25. Thank You!

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