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Home Energy Efficiency Report
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Home Energy Efficiency Report

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The latest report I wrote on Home Energy Efficiency for Pike Research.

The latest report I wrote on Home Energy Efficiency for Pike Research.

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  • 1.     Energy Efficient Homes Residential Energy Efficiency Retrofits, Green Building Techniques and Certification, Home Energy Audits, Utility and Government Energy Efficiency Programs, and Efficient Appliances and Systems    Compared to the commercial real estate market, the residential market for energy efficient products and services is in its infancy. Demand for these products and services has increased significantly over the past few years due to a rise in fuel and energy prices, improved awareness and participation in green home certification programs, and through government support. Government programs such as the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act have provided incentives for energy efficient products, services, and retrofits, spurring growth in these sectors. However, there is concern that the market for energy efficient products and services will be short-lived if government support ceases. Programs such as “Cash for Clunkers” (for appliances) and legislation like the Waxman-Markey bill are hoped to provide drivers for future growth in the residential energy efficiency market. Federal, state, and local governments will also play a significant role in increasing home energy efficiency codes and requirements, driving demand for home energy auditing and verification programs. As the U.S. housing stock continues to age and utility prices rise, there will be increasing opportunities for energy efficient products and services. The home improvement market is projected to grow slightly in 2010 with more significant growth occurring in 2011. This includes the installation of products to increase energy efficiency. Also, the development of a utility smart grid infrastructure will drive needs for smart appliances and meters to reduce energy usage. This Pike Research report examines the market for energy efficient products and services in the residential sector. The study analyzes market issues and demand drivers, including the effects of green certification programs, legislative and regulatory issues, incentives, and home financing programs. Additionally, we assess the new home and remodeling industries, home products and appliances, home energy evaluations, and utility services. The report includes five-year market forecasts as well as profiles of key industry players. KEY MARKET FORECASTS: INDUSTRY TOPICS:  Homeowner Improvement Expenditures, 2009-2014  American Recovery and Reinvestment Act  Industry Shipments of Select Major Home Appliances,1998-2010  Energy efficient home improvements  Energy Efficient Refrigerator Expenditures, 2009-2014  Energy efficient mortgages  Energy Efficient Clothes Washers Expenditures, 2009-2014  ENERGY STAR appliances  Residential Smart Meter Installations, 2009-2014  Green building certification programs  RESNET/HERS Energy Auditing Business, 2009-2014  Green building techniques  Home Builder Tax Credits  Home energy audits  Residential efficiency retrofits  Smart appliances  Smart meters  Solar photovoltaics (PV)  Utility energy efficiency programs
  • 2. TABLE OF CONTENTS: 2.4.6.3 Costs 2.4.7 DOE/Building America Program 1. Executive Summary 2.4.7.1 Home Energy Automation 2.4.7.2 Net Zero Homes 1.1 Commercial and Community Microgrids: A 2.4.8 Local Government Programs Competing Vision to Tomorrow’s Smart Grid? 2.4.9 Suppliers 2.4.9.1 Environments for Living Certified Green 1.2 Legislation and Incentives 2.4.9.1.1 EFL Guarantee 2.4.9.1.2 EFL vs. EFL Certified Green 1.3 Costs 2.4.9.2 GE – ecomagination 2.4.10 Summary 1.4 Auditing and Verification 2.5 Legislative and Regulatory Incentives and Drivers 1.5 Remodeling 2.5.1 Federal Government Focus 2.5.2 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 1.6 Fragmented Market 2.5.2.1 Homeowner Tax Credits 2.5.2.2 Home Improvement Guidelines 1.7 Smart Grid Products 2.5.2.3 Home Builder Tax Credits 2.5.2.4 Appliance Stimulus 1.8 Market Indicators and Forecasts 2.5.3 Proposed Federal Legislation and Policies 2.5.3.1 American Clean Energy and Security Act of 1.9 What Is an Energy Efficient Home? 2009 1.9.1 Sources of Energy Consumption 2.5.3.2 Recovery Through Retrofit 1.9.2 Sources of Savings 2.5.4 Local and Regional Regulations and Incentives 2.5.4.1 ARRA 2. Market Issues and Demand Drivers 2.5.4.2 State Energy Efficiency Rankings 2.5.4.3 California Standards 2.1 Introduction 2.5.4.4 Affordable Housing Programs 2.5.4.5 Local Energy Efficiency Block Grants 2.2 Homeowners’ Behaviors and Attitudes 2.2.1 Price: The Third “P” = Pocket 2.6 Financing Programs 2.2.2 Barriers to Home Retrofit 2.6.1 Homeowner Financing of Retrofits 2.6.2 Revolving Loan Funds 2.3 Awareness 2.6.3 PACE Program 2.3.1 Homeowners Demanding “Green” 2.6.4 Energy Efficient Mortgages (EEMs) 2.3.2 Home Builders Selling “Green” 2.3.3 Appraisals 2.7 Utility Companies 2.7.1 Renewable Energy and Net Metering 2.4 Certification and Rating Programs 2.7.2 Incentives and Rebates 2.4.1 Introduction 2.7.3 Examples of State/Local Rebates 2.4.2 U.S. Green Building Council – LEED for Homes 2.8 Product Suppliers and Installers 2.4.2.1 Energy Efficiency Credits 2.8.1 Products – Photovoltaic (PV) Solar 2.4.2.2 Providers and Raters 2.8.2 Fragmented Installation Industry 2.4.2.3 Program Costs 2.8.3 Increasing Competition 2.4.2.4 LEED for Homes Cost – Example   2.4.2.5 Affordable Homes 3. Market Segmentation 2.4.2.6 Program Adopters 2.4.2.7 Future Growth 3.1 Introduction 2.4.3 NAHB National Green Building Program 2.4.3.1 Energy Efficiency Points 3.2 Homeowners 2.4.3.2 Verification 2.4.3.3 Certified Green Professional (CGP) 3.3 New Home Construction vs. Retrofits 2.4.3.4 Costs 2.4.3.5 Program Status 3.4 Home Price Points 2.4.4 ENERGY STAR 3.4.1 Affordable Housing 2.4.4.1 ENERGY STAR-Qualified Homes 2.4.4.2 Verification Process and Home Raters 3.5 Home Ages 2.4.4.3 ENERGY STAR Homes Penetration 2.4.4.4 ENERGY STAR and Other Building 4. Energy Efficient Products and Services Programs 2.4.5 RESNET/HERS 4.1 Appliances 2.4.5.1 HERS Index 2.4.5.2 HERS Raters 4.2 Solar Photovoltaic Systems 2.4.5.3 Costs 2.4.5.4 Opportunities for Growth 4.3 Home Energy Audits 2.4.6 Regional Programs – Earth Craft House 2.4.6.1 Renovations 4.4 Architect and Design Services 2.4.6.2 Energy Efficiency Points 4.4.1 Design Tools – SEAT Software
  • 3. 4.5 Remodelers 6.6 Remodeling/Retrofit Market 6.6.1 Home Improvement Market 4.6 Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs) 6.6.1.1 Types of Improvements 4.6.1 Green-e 6.6.1.2 Age of Home 4.6.2 Utility Green Pricing Programs 6.6.2 Remodeling Market Index (RMI) 6.6.2.1 RMI and Project Size 5. Key Industry Players 6.6.3 Leading Indicator of Home Remodeling – LIRA 5.1 Product and Systems Suppliers 6.7 Products and Services 5.1.1 BP Solar 6.7.1 Home Appliances 5.1.1.1 Residential System Size, Costs, and 6.7.2 Smart Meters Payback 6.7.3 Photovoltaics 5.1.1.2 Certified Installer Program 6.7.4 Home Energy Audits 5.1.1.3 Market Growth 5.1.2 Carrier (United Technologies) 7. Company Directory 5.1.2.1 Infinity Remote Access 5.1.2.2 Hybrid Heat 8. Acronym and Abbreviation List 5.1.3 General Electric (GE) 5.1.3.1 Energy Monitoring Systems 9. Table of Contents 5.1.3.2 Energy Efficiency Programs 5.1.4 Honeywell 10. Table of Figures 5.1.4.1 Smart Thermostats 5.1.4.2 Home Automation 11. Scope of Study, Sources and Methodology, Notes 5.1.4.3 Energy Efficient Ventilation 5.1.4.4 Partnership Programs for Energy Efficiency LIST OF CHARTS & FIGURES: 5.1.5 Masco Corporation/Milgard Windows and Doors  Home Energy Use by System, United States 5.1.5.1 3D/3D MAX® Energy Package  Total U.S. Housing Stock: Year Structure Built 5.1.5.2 Environments for Living  World Oil Prices: 1980-2015 (in 2007 dollars per barrel) 5.1.6 Whirlpool 5.1.6.1 Smart Grid Appliances  U.S. Average Retail Electricity Prices: 1980-2015  Single-Family Housing Permits, Number of Housing Units: 2000- 5.2 New Home Builders 2009 5.2.1 Centex/Pulte/Del Webb  Single-Family Housing Starts, Total Single-Family Units: 2003- 5.2.1.1 ENERGY STAR-Qualified Homes 2009 5.2.1.2 DOE Builders Challenge  Single-Family Starts of New Homes in Recent Downturns: 1960- 5.2.1.3 Centex Energy Advantage Program 2000 5.2.1.4 LEED for Homes  Single-Family Sales of New Homes in Recent Downturns: 1960- 5.2.2 EYA 2000 5.2.2.1 LEED  U.S. Home Improvement Products Market: 2008-2014 5.2.2.2 Multi-Family Issues 5.2.3 KB Home  Energy Efficient Home Improvement Expenditures by Category, 5.2.3.1 My Home, My Earth U.S.: 2009-2014 5.2.3.2 ENERGY STAR  Energy-Sensitive Improvements: 1970-2005 5.2.3.3 Challenges  RMI, National Current & Future Expectations: 2001-2009  RMI, Current Expectations, U.S. Regions: 2003-2009 5.3 Home Energy Evaluations  RMI Future Expectations: 2003-2009 5.3.1 Building Performance Institute (BPI)  RMI Current Size of Project for Owners (Seasonally Adjusted): 2003-2009 5.4 Utility Services and Renewable Power 5.4.1 Clean Currents  Leading Indicator of Home Remodeling (LIRA), 4-Quarter Moving Totals: 1995-2010 5.4.2 OPOWER  Industry Shipments of Select Major Home Appliances: 1998- 2010 (Estimated) 6. Market Indicators and Forecasts  Energy Efficient Residential Refrigerator Expenditures, United 6.1 Introduction States: 2009-2014  Energy Efficient Clothes Washers Expenditures: 2009-2014 6.2 Economic Indicators  Smart Meter Installed Base, United States: 2008-2015  RESNET/HERS Energy Auditing Business: 2009-2014 6.3 Oil and Gas Prices  Energy Efficiency Market Indicators and Forecasts, United States: 2008-2014 6.4 Electricity Prices  Features of an Energy Efficient Home 6.5 New Home Construction  Importance of Home’s Environmentally Friendly Features 6.5.1 Months of Supply  Energy & Atmosphere Points  LEED for Homes vs. Code Home
  • 4.  NGB Energy Efficiency Points LIST OF TABLES:  ENERGY STAR-Qualified New Homes Penetration Rate: 2008  Potential Annual Utility Savings by Product/Feature  HERS Index  LEED for Homes Registration & Certification Fees  State Rebates for Renewable Energy (states with rebates indicated in red)  NGB Certification and Registration Fees  State Rebates for Renewable Energy (states with rebates  Earth Craft Renovation Point System indicated in red)  Cost of Compliance - NAHB & USGBC Certification Programs*  State Energy Efficiency Scorecard Results  ENERGY STAR Qualified New Homes Penetration Rate: 2008  EEM Example  Summary of Tax Credits for Homeowners  Average Price of Electricity by State  Utilities Offering Green-e Energy-Certified Green Pricing Programs: 2001-2008  Net Metering Capacity by State: October 2009  Utility Rebates for Renewable Energy (states with rebates  C-Green Utility Rates: November 2009 indicated in red  Energy Efficient Home Improvement Expenditures by Category, United States: 2009-2014  Residential Solar PV Installed Costs: 2008  Key Generations for Remodeling: 2005 and 2015  Energy Efficient Residential Refrigerator Expenditures, United States: 2009-2014  Average Annual Spending per Unit: 2000-2005 (2005 dollars)  Energy Efficient Clothes Washer Expenditures, United States: 2009-2014  Architectural Services: Business Conditions  Smart Meter Installed Base, United States: 2008-2015  Whirlpool Smart Device Network Architecture  RESNET/HERS Energy Auditing Revenue, United States:  U.S. Economic Performance: 2000-2014 2009-2014  Growth in Total Consumption Outlays: 2000-2014  Potential Annual Utility Savings by Product/Feature  LEED for Homes Registration & Certification Fees  NGB Certification and Registration Fees  Earth Craft Renovation Point System  Cost of Compliance – NAHB & USGBC Certification Programs  Utilities Offering Green-e Energy-Certified Green Pricing Programs: 2001-2008 KEY QUESTIONS ADDRESSED: REPORT DETAILS:  What are market issues and demand drivers for energy efficient products Price: $3500 and services for residential homes?  How do legislation and incentives play a role in the market for products and services? Pages: 93  What are the market segments for energy efficient products and services?  Who are the leaders in energy efficient products and services? Tables, Charts,  What are key market indicators for these products and services? Figures: 63  What will the market look like over the next five years? Release Date: 1Q 2010 WHO NEEDS THIS REPORT?  Home remodelers/retrofitters  Homebuilders  Energy auditing companies TO ORDER THIS REPORT:  Electric utilities  Renewable energy companies Phone: +1.303.997.7609  Architectural and design firms  Energy auditors and rating services Email: sales@pikeresearch.com  Appliance manufacturers  Smart grid products and services  Investors in energy efficient products and services  Government agencies  

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