Okanagan Waterwise: Local Government User Guide

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Okanagan Waterwise: Local Government User Guide

  1. 1. Local  Government  User  Guide  Okanagan  Water  Supply  and  Demand  Project  www.obwb.ca/wsd  
  2. 2.  Local  Government  User  Guide  to  the  Okanagan  Water  Supply  and  Demand  Project    ©  2011   Okanagan  Basin  Water  Board      Project  Manager:  Anna  Warwick  Sears,  Okanagan  Basin  Water  Board    Technical  Writer:  Jillian  Tamblyn    Editing  &  Layout:  Webwoman  Communications        All  correspondence  with  respect  to  this  User  Guide  should  be  directed  to:  Anna  Warwick  Sears  Executive  Director  Okanagan  Basin  Water  Board  1450  KLO  Road  Kelowna,  BC    V1W  3Z4    E-­‐mail:  anna.warwick.sears@obwb.ca  Phone:  250.469.6251  Fax:  250.762.7011  Web:  www.obwb.ca          The  information  provided  in  this  document  is  offered  as  a  public  service.    As   a   result,   the   information   in   this   Local   Government   User   Guide   is  general   in   nature   and   should   not   be   relied   upon   as   specific   advice   for  responding   to   particular   circumstances.     Local   governments,   and   other  authorities,   should   consider   the   appropriateness   of   the   suggestions   in  this   guide   and   adapt   them   to   suit   specific   local   conditions   and  requirements.     Plans   and   bylaws   should   not   be   put   in   place   without  professional  technical  and  legal  advice.    While   information   provided   within   this   document   is   believed   to   be  accurate   at   the   time   of   publication,   the   Okanagan   Basin   Water   Board  (OBWB)   cannot   confirm   its   currency,   accuracy,   or   completeness,   or   its  applicability   to,   or   suitability   for,   individual   circumstances.   Therefore,  persons   using   this   guide   should   take   steps   to   independently   verify   the  information.     The   guide   contains   links   to   web   sites   of   other  organizations.  The  Okanagan  Basin  Water  Board  does  not  control  these  websites  and  therefore  cannot  confirm  the  information  provided.        Local  Government  Users  Guide   2   Okanagan  Water  Supply  &  Demand  Project  
  3. 3. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS   The   Local   Government   User   Guide   to   the   Okanagan   Water   Supply   &   Demand   Project   is   a   project   of   the   Okanagan   Basin   Water   Board   (OBWB)   with   federal   funding   support   through   Natural  Resources  Canada’s  Regional  Adaptation  Collaborative  (RAC)  Program.     The   RAC   Program   enables   Canadians   to   be   better   prepared   to   adapt   to   changes   in   the   climate   by   providing  them  with  adaptation  knowledge,  tools,  networks  and  other  resources.  The  RAC  Program  is   a   partnership   initiative   that   addresses   regional   adaptation   priorities,   constituting   a   Canada-­‐wide   network   with   the   overarching   goal   of   accelerating   adaptation   at   the   national   scale.     Through   the   collaborative   efforts   of   over   120   partners,   including   all   levels   of   government,   academia,   non-­‐ governmental   organizations   and   the   private   sector,   the   RAC   Program   is   designed   to   promote   and   advance  integration  of  adaptation  considerations  into  decision-­‐making  to  help  Canadians  reduce  the   risks   and   embrace   the   opportunities   resulting   from   climate   change.     Some   areas   of   focus   include   decreases  in  water  supply  and  changes  to  timing  of  water  availability,  reduced  volume  and  duration   of  snow  cover,  and  increased  droughts  and  flooding.   Project  Manager:   Anna  Warwick  Sears,  Okanagan  Basin  Water  Board     Special  Thanks:   • Brian  Guy  and  Drew  Lejbak,  Summit  Environmental  Consultants  Inc.   • Denise  Neilsen,  Agriculture  and  Agri-­‐Food  Canada   • Don  Dobson,  Urban  Systems  Ltd.   • Ron  Fretwell,  RHF  Systems  Ltd.   • Ted  van  der  Gulik,  BC  Ministry  of  Agriculture   The  Okanagan  Water  Supply  &  Demand  Project  is  a   partnership  of  the  Okanagan  Basin  Water  Board   and  the  BC  Ministry  of  Environment.     Other  partners:   BC  Ministry  of  Community,  Sport  &  Cultural  Development   BC  Ministry  of  Agriculture   Environment  Canada   Agriculture  and  Agri-­‐Food  Canada   Fisheries  and  Oceans  Canada    Okanagan  Nation  Alliance     University  of  British  Columbia   Simon  Fraser  University   University  of  Lethbridge   BC  Agriculture  Council   Water  Supply  Association  of  BC    Local  Government  Users  Guide   3   Okanagan  Water  Supply  &  Demand  Project  
  4. 4.  Table  of  Contents  PART  I   INTRODUCTION.................................................................................................................................. 7  Why  Study  the  Okanagan  Basin? ........................................................................................................................................7  Adapting  to  Climate  Change ...............................................................................................................................................7  What  is  the  Okanagan  Water  Supply  &  Demand  Project? ..................................................................................................8  Project  Timeline  and  Next  Steps .........................................................................................................................................8  Project  Tools  and  Data ........................................................................................................................................................8  PART  II    KEY  FINDINGS................................................................................................................................. 10  PART  III   IMPLICATIONS  FOR  LOCAL  GOVERNMENT...................................................................................... 13  What  Do  the  Results  of  this  Project  Mean  for  Local  Governments  in  the  Okanagan? .....................................................13  Modernizing  British  Columbia’s  Water  Act .......................................................................................................................13  Considerations  in  Accessing  Information..........................................................................................................................14  PART  IV   ACCESS  POINTS .............................................................................................................................. 16   Okanagan  Water  Supply  &  Demand  Project  Website  -­‐  www.obwb.ca/wsd.................................................................16   Okanagan  Water  Supply  &  Demand  Viewer  –  www.obwb.ca/wsd ..............................................................................16   Okanagan  Water  Science  Library  –  www.obwb.ca/wsd...............................................................................................17   Okanagan  WaterWise  -­‐  www.okwaterwise.ca.............................................................................................................17   Streamlined  Water  Use  Reporting  Tool  –  www.obwb.ca/swurt...................................................................................17   Okanagan  Water  Database  -­‐  db.okanaganwater.ca....................................................................................................18  PART  V    MINING  THE  DATA ......................................................................................................................... 20  How  Should  Local  Governments  Use  This  Data? ..............................................................................................................20  Local  Government  Questions  and  Considerations............................................................................................................21   Water  Management  and  Land  Use  Planning................................................................................................................21   Agricultural  Area  Plans .................................................................................................................................................21   Official  Community  Plans..............................................................................................................................................23   Amendments  to  Official  Community  Plans  or  Zoning  Bylaws .......................................................................................24   Regional  Growth  Strategies ..........................................................................................................................................24   Subdivision  and  Servicing  Bylaws..................................................................................................................................25   Water  Services ..............................................................................................................................................................26   Infrastructure................................................................................................................................................................27   Parks  /  Facility  Management........................................................................................................................................28   Stream  Health  Restoration  Initiatives...........................................................................................................................28  PART  VI    MORE  ABOUT  DATA  AND  MODELS................................................................................................ 30   Figure  1  –  Project  Overview  (Phase  2) ..........................................................................................................................30  CLIMATE ............................................................................................................................................................................31  WATER  SUPPLY..................................................................................................................................................................32   Hydrology  Model ..........................................................................................................................................................32   Groundwater  Study.......................................................................................................................................................33   Figure  2  -­‐  Aquifers  at  Risk  in  the  Okanagan..................................................................................................................34   Surface  Water  Hydrology  Study....................................................................................................................................36   Figure  3  –  Surface  Water  Sub-­‐Basins  of  the  Okanagan ................................................................................................37   Instream  Flow  Needs  Study...........................................................................................................................................38  WATER  DEMAND...............................................................................................................................................................40   Okanagan  Water  Demand  Model.................................................................................................................................40   Water  Management  and  Use  Studies...........................................................................................................................40   Figure  4  –  Water  Use  Areas  in  the  Okanagan  Basin .....................................................................................................41  OKANAGAN  BASIN  WATER  ACCOUNTING  MODEL............................................................................................................43  SCENARIOS ........................................................................................................................................................................43  Local  Government  Users  Guide   4   Okanagan  Water  Supply  &  Demand  Project  
  5. 5. RESOURCES .................................................................................................................................................... 46  ONLINE  RESOURCES ....................................................................................................................................... 46  GLOSSARY ...................................................................................................................................................... 47  SOURCES ........................................................................................................................................................ 49  APPENDICES ................................................................................................................................................... 50  LIST  OF  FIGURES ............................................................................................................................................. 52   1.   Uses  of  Water........................................................................................................................................................10   2.   Sources  of  Water ...................................................................................................................................................10   3.   Per  Capita  Domestic  Water  Use ............................................................................................................................10   4.   Where  Incoming  Precipitation  Goes......................................................................................................................11   5.   Replenishment  of  Okanagan  Lake.........................................................................................................................13   6.   Figure  1  -­‐  Interactions  between  Phase  2  Technical  Studies  and  Models   ..............................................................30   7.   Figure  2  –  Aquifers  in  the  Okanagan   ....................................................................................................................34   8.   Okanagan  Lake  –  Average  Annual  Water  Balance  ...............................................................................................35   9.   Figure  3  -­‐  Surface  Water  Sub-­‐basins  of  the  Okanagan   .........................................................................................37   10.    Figure  4  -­‐  Water  Use  Areas  in  the  Okanagan  Basin   ..............................................................................................41            Local  Government  Users  Guide   5   Okanagan  Water  Supply  &  Demand  Project  
  6. 6.     Part  I   Introduction   Local  Government  Users  Guide   6   Okanagan  Water  Supply  &  Demand  Project   www.obwb.ca/wsd  
  7. 7.     PART  I   INTRODUCTION  This  User  Guide  outlines  how  to  access  current  and  future  water  supply  and  demand  information  to  support   What  is  the  effective  decision-­‐making  in  the  Okanagan  Basin.     Okanagan  Basin?   The  Okanagan  watershed,  or  How  to  Use  This  Guide:   basin,  is  a  narrow  strip  that  spans   • An  overview  of  the  Project,  data  and  models  is   from  Armstrong  to  the  US  border   and  includes  five  main  lakes  –   provided  in  Part  I,  Introduction.   Okanagan,  Kalamalka-­‐Wood,   • Discover  the  Project’s  key  findings  in  Part  II.   Skaha,  Vaseux  and  Osoyoos  –  and   surrounding  mountains.   • Find  out  what  the  Project’s  results  mean  for   local  government  in  Part  III,  Implications.   A  river  basin  or  watershed  is  high   at  its  edges  and  low  in  the  centre   • Learn  how  to  access  Project  data,  web  tools  and  models  in  Part  IV,   where  the  waters  flow.  The   Access  Points.   Okanagan  Basin  includes  all  the   • See  how  the  Project’s  climate,  land  use,  water  data,  and  models   land  that  feeds  water  to  our  big   lakes.  Kelowna,  Vernon,   can  be  used  to  answer  local  government  questions  in  Part  V,   Penticton  and  Osoyoos  all  lie   Mining  the  Data.     within  the  Okanagan  Basin.   • Read  more  about  available  tools,  models  and  data  in  Part  VI.       The  Okanagan  Basin  is  almost   2 200  km  in  length  and  8,000  km   in  area.  Why  Study  the  Okanagan  Basin?    The  Okanagan  has  the  lowest  per  person  water  supply  in  Canada  and   Where  does  water  from  the   highest   per   person   water   use,   with   a   growing   population   that   is   the  Okanagan  Basin  go?  vulnerable   to   climate   change.   Our   economy,   and   in   particular,   major   The  Okanagan  River  drains  the  industries  such  as  agriculture  and  tourism,  depend  on  the  health  of  our   lakes  and  flows  south  across  the   International  Boundary  to  join  water  resources.   the  Columbia  River,  which  then   flows  past  the  city  of  Portland  to  The   last   comprehensive   water   assessment   in   the   Okanagan   was   the  Pacific  Ocean.  completed  in  1974.  Since  then,  population  growth  has  outstripped  all  predictions   and   our   water   management   technologies   have   greatly   State  of  the  Basin:  improved.   Supply  and  demand  in  the   Okanagan  Basin  was  last  assessed   in  1974.  Adapting  to  Climate  Change   Many  streams  are  now  fully  Weather   in   the   Okanagan   is   known   to   be   arid   and   variable.     Climate   allocated,  and  users  are  moving  change  is  expected  to  result  in  warmer  winters,  lower  snow  pack  and   to  groundwater.  earlier   spring   runoff.     Longer   and   drier   growing   seasons   with   warmer   Increasing  water  licence  requests  temperatures   and   lower   rainfall   will   increase   agricultural   and   underscore  the  need  for  a  valley-­‐landscaping  water  demand.       wide  approach  to  water   management.  Adaptation  to  these  changing  conditions,  founded  on  science  and  best  management   practices,   must   occur.     Local   governments   in   the   The  Okanagan  has  the  lowest  per   person  water  supply  in  Canada.  Okanagan  must  build  capacity  for  climate  change  adaptation,  and  work  together   with   other   local   governments,   agencies   and   stakeholders   to   The  average  Okanagan  resident  develop   new   water   conservation   and   management   regimes   uses  675  litres  of  water  per  day,  throughout  the  basin.   more  than  double  the  Canadian   average.       Local  Government  Users  Guide   7   Okanagan  Water  Supply  &  Demand  Project   www.obwb.ca/wsd  
  8. 8.  What  is  the  Okanagan  Water  Supply  &  Demand  Project?   The  Okanagan  Water  Supply  &  The   Okanagan   Water   Supply   &   Demand   Project,   or   Project,   is   one   of   Demand  Project  is  state  of  the  the   most   advanced   water   resource   assessments   ever   conducted   in   art  in  Canada,  and  is  a  pilot  for  Canada,  using  the  latest  models  and  computer  technology  to  estimate   other  water-­‐stressed  areas  of   British  Columbia.    Okanagan   water   availability,   taking   into   account   climate   change   and  population  growth.    The   Project   includes   studies   on   groundwater,   stream-­‐flows,   A  best  estimate  of  environmental  water  needs,  and  water  use  –  balancing  water  supplies   current  and  future  and  water  demands  through  a  computer  accounting  model.   water  supply  and  demand   in  the  Okanagan.  The  Project  models  help  us  understand  patterns  of  water  use  and  the  potential  impacts  of  population  growth,  climate  change,  land  use  and   The  Okanagan  Basin  water  the   environment.   Updated   regularly,   these   models   are   essential   tools   regime  -­‐  hydrology,  actual  water   use,  groundwater,  lake  for  sustainability  planning.   evaporation  and  instream  flow   requirements  -­‐  is  assessed  using  The  Project  is  seeking  answers  to  these  questions:   Hydrology  and  Demand  Models,   • Is  our  water  over-­‐allocated?   which  feed  into  a  Water   • How  do  we  protect  groundwater?   Accounting  Model  that   calculates  the  water  balance  for   • How  will  we  share  during  shortages?   the  basin  at  81  points  in  the   • How  do  we  reduce  risks  to  water  quality?   valley.   • How  can  we  be  more  water  efficient?   • How  much  water  do  we  have?   Examine  supply  and   • What  does  the  future  hold?   demand  patterns  in   specific  areas  of  the  Project  Timeline  and  Next  Steps   watershed,  or  assess  Phase   1   (2005)   identified   available   data   and   information.   Technical   basin-­‐wide  trends.  studies  conducted  in  Phase  2  (initiated  2007)  led  to  the  development  of  an  Okanagan  water  budget,  or  model,  and  future  scenarios  for  use  by  local  governments  for  planning,  and  by  the  Province  of  BC  for  water   The  Demand  Model  developed  management.   by  this  project  has  been   reproduced  in  the  Similkameen,   Nicola,  and  Lower  Fraser  valleys  Project   results   to   date   indicate   a   need   for   more   careful   management   and  received  a  Premier’s  Award  and   choices   about   development,   the   future   of   agriculture,   and   for  Innovation.  environmental  protection.   Okanagan  local  governments  As  these  choices  require  informed  input  from  multiple  decision-­‐makers   have  already  begun  using  the  and   stakeholders,   Phase   3   (2010)   focuses   on   making   data   and   models  and  data  to  inform  information  available,  on  refining  modeling  tools,  and  on  consultation   regional  growth  strategies  and  and   policy   development.   It   paves   the   way   for   updates   by   collecting   planning.  data   on   critical   elements   such   as   lake   evaporation   and   groundwater.  Phase   3   ensures   that   the   work   of   Phase   2   is   put   to   best   use   for    planning,  adaptation,  education,  and  improved  management.     Access  all  project  tools,  Project  Tools  and  Data   reports  and  data  at  Learn  more  about  available  tools  and  data  in  Part  VI.  The  access  point  for   all   tools,   reports   and   data   produced   by   the   Project   is   the   Okanagan   www.obwb.ca/wsd    Water  Supply  &  Demand  Project  website  at  www.obwb.ca/wsd.     Local  Government  Users  Guide   8   Okanagan  Water  Supply  &  Demand  Project   www.obwb.ca/wsd  
  9. 9.       Part  II   Key  Findings   Local  Government  Users  Guide   9   Okanagan  Water  Supply  &  Demand  Project   www.obwb.ca/wsd  
  10. 10.     PART  II    KEY  FINDINGS  • Risks   of   water   shortages   for   human   use   and   1 Uses  of  Water   environmental  needs  are  increasing,  and  it  will  only   be   possible   to   compensate   through   thoughtful   design   and   implementation   of   policies,   including   local   government   drought   management   plans,   to   address   land-­‐use   planning,   careful   water   management   including   supply,   and   demand   reduction.     Coordinated   plans   may   be   required   for   the  basin  as  a  whole.    • Future   shortages   are   likely   to   occur   in   late   summer,   when   low   seasonal   water   supplies   from   surface   sources   are   projected   to   drop   by   as   much   as   65%   from   2041   to   2070,   and   demands   for   water   withdrawals  and  ecosystem  needs  are  high  and  increasing.    Local  governments  can  consider  this  for  water   supply  and  demand  planning.   Sources  of  Water   • High  variability  in  water  supply  and  demand  –  seasonally,  from   year-­‐to-­‐year,   and   in   different   geographic   areas,   should   be   considered  in  decision-­‐making.   • Groundwater   is   an   increasingly   important   source   of   water   for   human  needs,  yet  is  under-­‐regulated.    Our  knowledge  of  supply   potential,   aquifer   health,   and   of   the   actual   amount   of   groundwater   use   is   poor.     Groundwater   and   surface   water   are   connected   and   should   be   managed   as   the   same   pool.   Groundwater   should   be   permitted   or   licensed   within   the   same   allocation  system  used  for  surface  water.  • Per   capita   domestic   water   use   in   the   Okanagan   is   extremely   Per  Capita  Domestic  Water  Use   high  compared  to  national  and  international  use,  primarily  due   to   domestic   outdoor   water   use,   which   accounts   for   24%   of   all   the   water   used   in   the   Okanagan.     Action   is   needed   to   reduce   use  through  proven  conservation  measures,  which  tend  to  cost   less  than  measures  to  increase  supply.    Local  governments  can   implement  measures  through  bylaws  and  incentives.  • About  95%  of  the  water  licensed  for  offstream  use  is  managed   by   57   large   water   suppliers   in   the   basin.   Local   governments,   Bands   and   purveyors   on   this   list   of   suppliers   can   have   a   large   impact  on  water  use.  1.  Agriculture  uses  55%  of  water  in  the  Okanagan.    This  percentage  does  not  include  farms  equipped  with  irrigation  systems  that  are  not  currently  irrigating  and  therefore  does  not  reflect  the  total  potential  amount  of  water  committed  to  agriculture  in  the  Okanagan.     Local  Government  Users  Guide   10   Okanagan  Water  Supply  &  Demand  Project   www.obwb.ca/wsd  
  11. 11.    • Measurement   and   record-­‐keeping   of   bulk   water   withdrawals   by   major   water   suppliers   and   large   individual   licencees   has   not   been   standardized   and   is   patchy   and   inconsistent,   and   coordinated   record   keeping   is   needed.  Water  purveyors  can   now   report  use  with  the  Streamlined  Water  Use  Reporting   Tool  (See   Part   IV  -­‐   Access  Points,  Page  16).   Where  Incoming  Precipitation  Goes  • 80%   of   incoming   precipitation   is   lost   to   evapotranspiration  from  plants  and  evaporation  from  lake   surfaces.  Only  13%  contributes  to  surface  flows  and  7%  to   groundwater  recharge.  • Stream   flows   must   be   measured   for   best   management.     However,   within   the   last   decade,   the   network   of   hydrologic   stations   has   been   reduced   to   about   half   of   historical   levels,   and   the   network   must   be   strategically   redesigned  and  restored.  • As   a   result   of   continuing   climate   change,   more   winter   precipitation  will  fall  as  rain  and  high  elevation  snowpacks  will  melt  several  weeks  sooner.  This  increases  the   importance  of  upland  reservoir  storage  and  the  difficulty  of  managing  supplies.  • In  a  future  three-­‐year  drought,  average  annual  net  inflows  to  Okanagan  Lake  are  expected  to  be  roughly  half   of   average   values   today.       Assuming   such   a   scenario   with   current   operating   procedures,   Okanagan   Lake   levels  would  progressively  decline  to  below  normal  operating  ranges,  and  could  affect  the  ability  to  keep   water  flowing  in  Okanagan  River,  which  can  affect  water  intakes.  • Due   to   climate   change   alone   (ignoring   population   growth   or  addition  of  irrigated  land),  the  level  of  Okanagan  Lake  is   expected   to   drop   below   its   historic   minimum   several   times   over   the   next   30   years.     This   can   impact   recreation   and  infrastructure.  • Current   water   licence   volumes   may   not   be   available   or   sufficient   to   satisfy   demands   on   some   streams   in   future,   particularly  on  those  with  limited  or  no  storage.  • The   models   are   based   on   available   scientific   and   water   management   information;   however,   the   quality   of   that   information  is  variable,  and  in  some  areas  additional  data   and   information   should   be   obtained   on   surface   water,   groundwater,  climate,  water  withdrawals  and  distribution,   aquatic   ecosystem   needs,   lake   evaporation,   and   evapotranspiration.   Visualize  project  results  with  the  Viewer   at  www.okanaganwater.ca     Local  Government  Users  Guide   11   Okanagan  Water  Supply  &  Demand  Project   www.obwb.ca/wsd  
  12. 12.       Part  III   Implications  for  Local   Government   Local  Government  Users  Guide   12   Okanagan  Water  Supply  &  Demand  Project   www.obwb.ca/wsd  
  13. 13.     PART  III   IMPLICATIONS  FOR  LOCAL  GOVERNMENT  What  Do  the  Results  of  this   Did  You  Know?  Project  Mean  for  Local   th Only  about  1/60  of  the  volume  of  Okanagan  Lake  is  refreshed  Governments  in  the   each  year.    Reduced  inflows  or  increased  withdrawals  in  the   watershed  could  cause  drawdown  of  the  lake.  Okanagan?  Local   governments   make   important  planning,   infrastructure   development  and   operational   decisions   every   day.      Many   Okanagan   local   governments  manage  one  or  more  water  utilities.  Changing   climatic   conditions   will  challenge   our   resilience   and   our  ability   to   adapt.   How   do   we   ensure  adequate   risk   management   in   a   time    of   change   and   uncertainty?     How   do  we   know   what   the   future   will   bring?     Only  the  upper  1.5  metres  of  Okanagan  Lake  is  replenished  each  year.    If  What   will   be   the   impacts   of   climate   more  water  is  withdrawn,  lake  levels  will  fall.  (Turner  et.  al,  2006).  change   and   population   growth,   and    how  will  we  adapt?  Climate  change  is  predicted  to  strongly  impact  our  water  supplies.  Paleo-­‐ecological  studies  show  that  the  20th  century   was   the   wettest   of   the   last   4,000   years.   As   the   Earth   warms,   the   frequency   and   intensity   of   extreme  weather  events  is  expected  to  increase.    What  type  of  weather  abnormalities  and  unseasonal  events  will  we  face  in  the  future?      The  results  of  this  Project  reinforce  the  need  for:   • Water  conservation  programs  and  bylaws  to  reduce  demand,  with  a  particular  emphasis  on  reducing   outdoor  use,  including  but  not  limited  to  water  metering,  water  reduction  incentives,  drought-­‐tolerant   landscaping,  and  efficient  irrigation  practices.   • Drought  response  plans  to  reduce  the  impacts  of  shortages  on  water  users,  including  the  environment.     • Increased  reservoir  storage  in  upland  reservoirs,  and  through  management  of  mainstem  lakes.   • Increased  collaboration  with  watershed  managers  and  water  suppliers  throughout  the  basin.    Modernizing  British  Columbia’s  Water  Act    The  results  of  this  Project  are  also  informing  the  modernization  of  BC’s  Water  Act.  The  Okanagan  Water  Supply  and   Demand   Project   Working   Group,   the   multi-­‐agency   body   overseeing   the   Project,   has   submitted   a   list   of  recommendations  for  Water  Act  Modernization  to  the  Province,  including:   • Improved  measurement  and  reporting  of  surface  and  groundwater  use   • A  mechanism  for  the  licensing  of  groundwater   • Protection  of  upland  reservoirs     • Regulatory  incentives  for  improvements  in  water  use  efficiency  for  all  sectors   • Recognition  of  regional  differences  –  i.e.  one  size  does  not  fit  all.     Local  Government  Users  Guide   13   Okanagan  Water  Supply  &  Demand  Project   www.obwb.ca/wsd  
  14. 14.   • Water  allocation  decisions  to  consider  water  availability,  including  the  potential  for  drought,  variability   or  climate  change,  a  watershed  review  of  existing  licences,  and  environmental  needs.  Considerations  in  Accessing  Information  With  so  much  information  available  from  the  Okanagan  Water  Supply  &  Demand  Project,  it  may  be  difficult  to  know  where  to  start.  A  local  government  will  benefit  from  taking  the  time  to  scope  its  needs.  Consider  these  relevant  questions:   • What  do  we  already  know  about  actual  or  estimated  water  supply,  demand   and  delivery  in  our  area?   • What  are  our  goals  and  objectives?   • What  questions  do  we  need  answered  about  water  supply  or  demand,   today  and  in  the  future?   • Is  this  an  operational  or  a  planning  decision?   • What  can  we  learn  by  looking  at  past,  present  and  future  scenarios?   • What  is  our  study  area  and  how  is  it  defined  in  relation  to  the  water  sub-­‐units  used  in  this  Project  (e.g.   aquifers,  water  use  areas,  sub-­‐basins)?   • What  is  the  time  period  or  scale  –  seasonal  or  annual,  present  or  future?   • What  risk  factors  are  we  considering,  and  what  level  of  confidence  is  needed  in  the  data?   • What  existing  or  recent  data  can  our  local  government  provide  to  calibrate,  improve  or  supplement  the   results  of  the  Project?   • Can  we  perform  additional  studies  to  improve  the  model  in  our  geographic  area  to  meet  the  required   level  of  confidence  (e.g.  by  incorporating  purveyor  actual  water  use  data  or  current  land  use)?      Local  governments  should  keep  in  mind  that:     • Some  models  provide  more  detailed  data  than  others.   The  Demand  Model  provides  estimates  at  the  scale  of  individual  properties.  The  Hydrology  and  Water   Accounting  Models  are  more  appropriate  for  examining  larger  geographic  areas,  such  as  the  entire  area   of  the  basin,  sub-­‐basins,  stream  systems,  drainages  or  water  use  areas.  Data  continues  to  be  gathered  to   improve  the  Models.   • Scenarios   that   examine   proposed   changes   or   activities   in   only   one   To  address  this   part   of   the   watershed   may   be   too   limited   in   scope.   Other   activities   information  gap,  the   occurring  upstream  or  downstream  may  mitigate  or  compound  these   Hydrological   proposed   changes.   For   example,   when   considering   the   potential   Connectivity  Project  will   impacts   of   a   specific   large   housing   development   in   one   water   use   examine  licence   area,   the   model   will   not   reflect   the   impact   of   up-­‐   or   down-­‐stream   priorities,  i.e.  who  has   rights  to  the  water,  and   developments.   how  water  use  in  one   • Supply   scenarios   for   lake   water   availability   are   less   complex   than   area  affects  another.   those   for   tributary   streams.   Decision-­‐making   in   tributaries   can   be   more  difficult.   • Phase   2   examined   BASIN-­‐WIDE   scenarios,   but   local   governments   may   request   SPECIFIC   scenarios   based  on  their  geographical  area,  land  use  cases,  or  other  assumptions.  Submit  a  Data  Request  online  at   db.okanaganwater.ca  or  contact  the  OBWB  for  more  information.     Local  Government  Users  Guide   14   Okanagan  Water  Supply  &  Demand  Project   www.obwb.ca/wsd  
  15. 15.       Part  IV   Access  Points   Local  Government  Users  Guide   15   Okanagan  Water  Supply  &  Demand  Project   www.obwb.ca/wsd  
  16. 16.     PART  IV   ACCESS  POINTS  Okanagan  Water  Supply  &  Demand  Project  Website  -­‐  www.obwb.ca/wsd  The  Okanagan  Water  Supply  &  Demand  Project  website  is  the  main  access  point  for  all  tools,  reports  and  data  produced  by  the  Project.      Visit  the  Okanagan  Water  Supply  &  Demand  (WSD)  website  to  find  out  more  about  the  Project,  and  to  access:   • Project  Updates   • Phase  2  Project  Summary  Report,  Maps  &  Appendices   • Okanagan  Water  Supply  &  Demand  Viewer   • Okanagan  Water  Science  Library   • Okanagan  WaterWise   • Okanagan  Water  Database   www.obwb.ca/wsd  Access  the  WSD  website  at  www.obwb.ca/wsd    Okanagan  Water  Supply  &  Demand  Viewer  –  www.obwb.ca/wsd  The   Okanagan   Water   Supply   &   Demand   Viewer   is   a   web-­‐based   tool   that   displays   interactive   maps   of   water  sources,  water  use,  and  other  results  of  the  Okanagan  Water  Supply  &  Demand  Project  in  a  user-­‐friendly  format.          The  Viewer  provides  graphical  and  statistical  information  about  the  current  state  of  water  supply  and  demand  at  various  locations  in  the   OkanaganOkanagan   valley,   and   examines   the   likely   future   influences   of   Water Supply & Demandpopulation  growth,  climate  change,  land  use,  and  other  factors.       Viewer  Available  comparative  scenarios  include:   • Population  Growth:   The  expected  rate  versus  a  higher  rate.     • Agricultural  Conditions:   The  current  amount  of  land  under  cultivation  versus  a  larger   area  that  includes  all  reasonably  irrigable  land.     • Water  Use  Efficiency:   Current  trends  versus  the  Provincial  guideline  of  achieving   33%  efficiency  improvements  by  2020.  Additionally,  one  of  the  scenarios  simulates  the  effects  of  a  three-­‐year  drought,  similar  to  the  historically  significant  Okanagan  drought  of  1929-­‐1931.    The  Viewer  is  available  from  every  page  of  the  WSD  website  at  www.obwb.ca/wsd  or  access  the  Viewer  directly  at  www.okanaganwater.ca.     Local  Government  Users  Guide   16   Okanagan  Water  Supply  &  Demand  Project   www.obwb.ca/wsd  
  17. 17.  Okanagan  Water  Science  Library  –  www.obwb.ca/wsd  The  Okanagan  Basin  Water  Resource  Information  Database  (OBWRID)  is  a   fully   searchable   digital   document   database,   or   Okanagan   Water  Science   Library,   of   water-­‐related   information   compiled,   studied   and  acquired  about  the  Okanagan  Basin.    Try  a  simple  Keyword  Search,  Browse  by  Topic,  or  perform  an  Advanced  Search  by  specifying  parameters  such  as  date,  author,  subject,  keyword,  watershed,  surface  or  groundwater.    The   Okanagan   Water   Science   Library   is   the   largest   electronic   repository   of   current   and   historical   information  about  the  Okanagan  Basin,  and  is  the  only  digital  source  for  many  Okanagan  water  documents  and  reports.  Links  to  downloadable  PDFs  are  provided  for  most  entries.    The  Okanagan  Water  Science  Library  is  searchable  from  every  page  of  the  WSD  website  at  www.obwb.ca/wsd  or  access  the  Advanced  Search  page  directly  at  www.obwb.ca/obwrid.      Okanagan  WaterWise  -­‐  www.okwaterwise.ca  Okanagan   WaterWise   is   an   Okanagan   Basin   Water   Board   outreach  initiative   that   encourages   conserving   &   protecting   the   Okanagan’s  most   valuable   natural   resource   -­‐   water.     This   educational   web   site  features   water   conservation   tips   and   information   for   homes,  businesses  and  schools,  and  addresses  both  indoor  and  outdoor  water  use.  The  Okanagan  WaterWise  website  is  accessible  from  every  page  of  the  WSD  website  at  www.obwb.ca/wsd  or  access  the  site  directly  at  www.okwaterwise.ca.    Streamlined  Water  Use  Reporting  Tool  –  www.obwb.ca/swurt    The   Streamlined   Water   Use   Reporting   Tool   (SWURT)   is   targeted   to  water   purveyors   and   other   large   water   users.     This   graphical   tool  summarizes  current  and  future  water  availability  in  the  valley  –  taking  into  account  population,  climate,  and  land  use.    Water   purveyors   can   use   this   tool   to   track   surface   and   groundwater  use   and   storage,   and   to   access   current   and   historical   information,  including   snowpack   depths,   reservoir   levels,   stream-­‐flows,   and  weather.   SWURT   is   accessible   only   to   registered   users   –   please  contact   the   OBWB   for   more  information.   “The  SWURT  tool  will  allow  utilities  to  provide  current  water  use  data     and  access  historic  data  for  trending.  And  just  as  importantly,  we’ll  be   able  to  see  what  other  water  utilities  in  the  valley  are  extracting,  For  more  information  about  SWURT,   helping  us  work  together  and  manage  our  common  water  resource.”  visit  www.obwb.ca/swurt.    –  Bob  Hrasko,  Vice-­‐Chair,  Water  Supply  Association  of  BC  and     Administrator,  Black  Mountain  Irrigation  District     Local  Government  Users  Guide   17   Okanagan  Water  Supply  &  Demand  Project   www.obwb.ca/wsd  
  18. 18.  Okanagan  Water  Database  -­‐  db.okanaganwater.ca  The   Okanagan   Water   Database   is   the   repository   and  management   tool   for   all   technical   Project   data   and   acts   as   the  data  bridge  between  the  Project  models.        The  primary  function  of  the  database  is  to  host  time  series  and  other  data  produced  by  the  Project’s  technical  studies,  which  include  estimates  of  water  use  throughout  the  basin  from  the  Demand  Model,  supply  information  derived   from   the   Hydrology   Model,   and   the   effects   of   water   management   on   natural   flows   and   lake   levels   as  calculated  by  the  Water  Accounting  Model.     Information  from  the  Okanagan  Water  Database  is  freely  available  through  the  tools  produced  by  the   Project,  most  notably  the  user-­‐friendly  and  interactive  Okanagan  Water  Supply  &  Demand  Viewer.      Data  Requests  &  Uploads  The   Okanagan   Water   Database   is   managed   by   the   Okanagan   Basin  Water   Board   (OBWB).     Specific   or   ‘protected’   data   sets   and   models  may   be   accessed   through   a   Data   Sharing   Agreement.       After   a   local  government  has  determined  its  project  scope  and  parameters,  OBWB  staff   and   contractors   will   assist   in   refining   the   information   request  and   identifying   the   opportunities   and   limitations   of   the   data   and  models.    Visit  db.okanaganwater.ca  to  Submit  a  Data  Request,  or  contact  the  OBWB  for  more  information.        Data  Sharing  Agreement  &  Costs  The   OBWB   will   cover   all   or   a   portion   of   data   retrieval   costs   for  Okanagan   local   governments,   with   the   cost-­‐sharing   formula   to   be  determined   by   the   scale   of   the   request   and   availability   of   funding.    Parties   other   than   local   governments,   or   not   contributing   to   the   Visualize  data  from  the  Okanagan  Water  Project,  will  be  charged  on  a  cost-­‐recovery  basis.       Database  with  the  Viewer  at   www.okanaganwater.ca        For  more  information  on  the  Okanagan  Water  Database:   • Submit  a  Data  Request  online  at  db.okanaganwater.ca     • Contact  the  OBWB:   Okanagan  Basin  Water  Board   1450  KLO  Road,  Kelowna  BC  V1W  3Z4   Phone:  250-­‐469-­‐6323   Fax:  250-­‐762-­‐7011   info@obwb.ca       Local  Government  Users  Guide   18   Okanagan  Water  Supply  &  Demand  Project   www.obwb.ca/wsd  
  19. 19.           Part  V   Mining  the  Data     Local  Government  Users  Guide   19   Okanagan  Water  Supply  &  Demand  Project   www.obwb.ca/wsd  
  20. 20.     PART  V    MINING  THE  DATA    The   Okanagan   Water   Supply   &   Demand   Project   signifies   a   major   step   How  Researchers  Are  Using  forward  in  our  understanding  of  the  Okanagan  Basin,  making  it  one  of   the  Results  of  the  the  most  water  information-­‐rich  areas  in  British  Columbia.   Okanagan  Water  Supply  &     Demand  Project  A   number   of   user-­‐friendly   web-­‐based   tools   have   been   developed   to  assist  local  governments  and  other  users  in  understanding,  accessing    and  applying  the  Project’s  results  and  data.    The   main   access   point   for   all   tools,   data   and   models   developed   for  the  Project  is  the  Okanagan  Water  Supply  &  Demand   Project  website  at  www.obwb.ca/wsd.        Visit   the   Project   website   at   www.obwb.ca/wsd   to   access   tools   such   Virtual  Water  Use  in  as  the  Okanagan  Water  Supply  &  Demand  Viewer  and  the  Okanagan   the  Okanagan  Water   Science   Library,   and   learn   more   about   each   tool   in   Part   VI   of   Dr.  Hans  Schreier  at  the  this  Guide.   University  of  British  Columbia   used  the  maps  and  water     requirements  of  agricultural   areas,  parks,  and  other  large  turf  How  Should  Local  Governments  Use  This  Data?   areas  to  determine  the  amount  Questions  about  water  supply  and  demand  are  important  to  many  of   of  water  used  to  produce  wine  the  services  that  local  governments  provide.  Generally,  the  Project’s   and  other  local  agricultural  results  indicate  what  is  happening  with  water  in  the  Okanagan  Basin,   products.    This  water  use  can   then  be  compared  to  the  “virtual  and  what  is  expected  to  happen  in  the  future.       water”  that  is  imported  into  the     basin  by  the  import  of  Each   local   government   must   determine   how   best   to   address   these   agricultural  products  that  are  results.   The   models   and   data   used   in   this   Project   can   be   used   in   a   grown  elsewhere.  variety  of  ways  by  local  governments.    Local   governments   may   also   request   specific   datasets   or   scenarios  for   their   particular   geographical   area,   land   use   cases,   or   other  assumptions,  from  the  Okanagan  Basin  Water  Board  (OBWB).  Staff  and  consultants  of  the  Okanagan  Basin  Water  Board  are  available  to  assist  with  accessing  and  processing  limited  public  access  data.    Keep  in  mind  that  many  of  the  Project’s  components  can  be  used  to   Pollinator  Studies  in  answer   questions   about   current   and   future   scenarios   at   a   variety   of   Okanagan  Agricultural  Areas   Using  the  maps  of  agricultural  scales  -­‐  however,  some  datasets  may  not  be  available  at  the  level  of   areas  developed  by  this  project,  accuracy  or  detail  required  for  your  project,  and  may  only  provide  a   Dr.  Jason  Pither  and  his  research  starting  point  for  further  investigation.   team  at  UBC-­‐Okanagan  are     studying  the  distribution  of  For   example,   a   local   government   may   identify   an   aquifer   that   is   different  crops  and  how  they  sensitive  to  further  development  or  an  expansion  of  agriculture  –  and   may  affect  the  presence  and   abundance  of  different  then  determine  how  to  respond  to  that  information  through  bylaws,   pollinators.  decision-­‐making  or  additional  detailed  studies.         Local  Government  Users  Guide   20   Okanagan  Water  Supply  &  Demand  Project   www.obwb.ca/wsd  

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