Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Landowner Impact Center Overview-Social marketing and Audience Segmentation
Landowner Impact Center Overview-Social marketing and Audience Segmentation
Landowner Impact Center Overview-Social marketing and Audience Segmentation
Landowner Impact Center Overview-Social marketing and Audience Segmentation
Landowner Impact Center Overview-Social marketing and Audience Segmentation
Landowner Impact Center Overview-Social marketing and Audience Segmentation
Landowner Impact Center Overview-Social marketing and Audience Segmentation
Landowner Impact Center Overview-Social marketing and Audience Segmentation
Landowner Impact Center Overview-Social marketing and Audience Segmentation
Landowner Impact Center Overview-Social marketing and Audience Segmentation
Landowner Impact Center Overview-Social marketing and Audience Segmentation
Landowner Impact Center Overview-Social marketing and Audience Segmentation
Landowner Impact Center Overview-Social marketing and Audience Segmentation
Landowner Impact Center Overview-Social marketing and Audience Segmentation
Landowner Impact Center Overview-Social marketing and Audience Segmentation
Landowner Impact Center Overview-Social marketing and Audience Segmentation
Landowner Impact Center Overview-Social marketing and Audience Segmentation
Landowner Impact Center Overview-Social marketing and Audience Segmentation
Landowner Impact Center Overview-Social marketing and Audience Segmentation
Landowner Impact Center Overview-Social marketing and Audience Segmentation
Landowner Impact Center Overview-Social marketing and Audience Segmentation
Landowner Impact Center Overview-Social marketing and Audience Segmentation
Landowner Impact Center Overview-Social marketing and Audience Segmentation
Landowner Impact Center Overview-Social marketing and Audience Segmentation
Landowner Impact Center Overview-Social marketing and Audience Segmentation
Landowner Impact Center Overview-Social marketing and Audience Segmentation
Landowner Impact Center Overview-Social marketing and Audience Segmentation
Landowner Impact Center Overview-Social marketing and Audience Segmentation
Landowner Impact Center Overview-Social marketing and Audience Segmentation
Landowner Impact Center Overview-Social marketing and Audience Segmentation
Landowner Impact Center Overview-Social marketing and Audience Segmentation
Landowner Impact Center Overview-Social marketing and Audience Segmentation
Landowner Impact Center Overview-Social marketing and Audience Segmentation
Landowner Impact Center Overview-Social marketing and Audience Segmentation
Landowner Impact Center Overview-Social marketing and Audience Segmentation
Landowner Impact Center Overview-Social marketing and Audience Segmentation
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Landowner Impact Center Overview-Social marketing and Audience Segmentation

111

Published on

At the 2014 American Tree Farm System National Leadership Conference, AFF's new Landowner Impact Center gave a presentation about the Center, Social Marketing and Audience Segmentation used around the …

At the 2014 American Tree Farm System National Leadership Conference, AFF's new Landowner Impact Center gave a presentation about the Center, Social Marketing and Audience Segmentation used around the topic of tree conservation.

Published in: Marketing
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
111
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Overview of the Impact Center and behavior change strategiesLearn about segmenting your audience and picking the right message and messengerExamples of current Impact Center projectsLearn from these projects how to integrate these ideas into future grant applicationsMention Bettina’s and MacKenzie’s grant session just before thisSmall group facilitated discussion Use what you learn Wrap-upQ&A and review strategies that could be used immediately at home
  • The Impact Center wants to work with partners to focus on specific outcomes, find the woodland owners that are more likely to take actionand focus our outreach and sustaining strategies on the most likely participants. You know that there are at least 22 million woodland property owners:- 7 million have more than 10 acresThey all have different values, attitudes and reasons for owning their landIncreasing threats demand greater woodlands management. We all have limited marketing dollars so we need to try something new to reach unengaged landowners. The traditional way of doing things has not been highly effective.
  • We knew we were on to something when we started to move away from business as usual in WI and MS. The use of targeted marketing allows us great efficiencies. Over the last two years, the American Forest Foundation has developed and ground tested these tools and approaches. In the oak hickory hardwood region of southwest Wisconsin and long leaf country in southeast Mississippi, the testing has resulted in average response rates from small woodland owners of 12 percent rather than the typical 1 to 3 percent. More important, the landowners responding are overwhelmingly unengaged, that is, we have been able to identify and activate those landowners who have not been engaged with their land in any way. Finally, we have tested various tools and strategies for sustaining communications with those landowners after the initial marketing that builds the trust and confidence so essential to helping landowners become active stewards of their land.
  • This is a new way of doing business for us.So AFF built a Woodland Owner Impact Center. The Impact center helps AFF and partners be more effective at getting unengaged landowners actively managing their land to achieve conservation and economic outcomes
  • The Center works with partners by helping them identify:Specific outcomesLandowner actions to be taken towards the desired outcomeLandowners most likely to be interested in taking actionThe barriers the audience encounters to complete the actionThe strategies to overcome those barriersEvaluation and sustaining methodsAdded up these tactics build the Impact Center’s behavior change suite of tools and systems.
  • One of the ultimate goals of the Impact Center is to build the industry’s knowledge base. We want to conduct various projects, evaluate the results of those projects to help build a cumulative knowledge base that we use to refine the strategies and then share those lessons with others. We hope all Tree Farm committees are interested in helping us build this knowledge base.
  • We need to recognize that woodland owners won’t take the big leap to a Forest Stewardship Plan… that the behavior change that we seek --- more active management on the ground in specific places to achieve ecological and economic outcomes requires that we understand the Cycle of Engagement…We need to reach out to woodland owners who are interested in discovering ways to improve their woods. We offer messages and tools to raise their awareness of why they need to be actively managing. We develop information that makes it clear what actions need to be taken. Our communications reinforce this and help move them toward choosing and implementing that action.The woodland owner than begins to evaluate the benefits received from the chosen action. Through this they gain new knowledge and begin the cycle again by becoming aware, picking an action and so on. We have to understand these steps and support the woodland owner as they move through this cycle if we are to create sustained engagement over time…
  • On the screen you see the different social marketingsteps, they look similar to how we work with partners! We’ll go over these in detail as we move through the presentation.Sara and Chris will show how they are used in various placed-based examples.
  • I’m sure many of you in the room are familiar with the Sustaining Family Forest Initiative. On this website you can query the National Woodland Owner Survey results for your state or region. This information can help you better understand your constituent’s reasons for owning land, who’s more likely to write a management plan, how do absentee owners behave, etc. Raise your hand if you have been on this website?[Click again to show example of the types of profiles you can get] – Woodland retreat profile in GeorgiaHere is an example of a woodland retreat profile from GA.
  • The Impact Center is hooking into all of these datasets (and others) and building a one-of-a-kind predictive landowner database to help us better segment our audiences. The database has household level demographic data like that from the Census, tax rolls and recreational licenses.To that we add predictive zip code level attitude and behavior information and communication channels.Then finally, AFF provided over 1,000 forestry specific data points. Some are conservation, some recreational, but all are related to forestry. The database only uses publically available or self reported data.This predictive modeling can be used for improving conservation, finding advocates, increasing certified fiber - you name it. It helps identify potential low-hanging fruit so we can spend marketing money effectively and reach them with the right message at the right time in the places where they get their information
  • Some possible behavior change strategies outlined in the book “Fostering Sustainable Behavior” include:Communication - The Impact Center has been using this tool very effectively in the Driftless and Piney Woods via direct mail postcards. Commitment- An example of commitment for tree farmers is the all important ATFS green and white sign. Prompts – AFF prompts visitors to give us their email address each time they visit our website. SocialNorms - Tree Farm field days offer an excellent way to model the correct behavior desired.Convenience – It is important that products and services we provide are convenient for the audience. (Example?)Feedback – Tree farm inspections are a prime example of this.
  • When developing a strategy remember:Reduce barriers andEnhance motivationSome strategies help increase motivation (incentives) while others decrease barriers (prompts).
  • Early stages of this project bringing together AFF, SFI and the NC Tree Farm Program in a coordinated outreach project to build Certification and have an ecological impact in a targeted area.Purpose: Get landowners on a pathway to sustainable forest management Motivate landowners who are already actively managing their land to attain ATFS CertificationEcological and Economic Lens: Ecological driver: Longleaf conservation and restoration Economic driver: Increase Certified fiber in a specific woodshedHow will we identify the core geographic areas of focus for this project? Roughly established using the North Carolina Significant Geographic Areas (as identified in America’s Longleaf Conservation Plan) Added a layer of State Forest Stewardship Landowners Added a layer of woodshed boundaries of participating SFI partnersLandowners within this focal geography constitute the potential audience.How will we segment the potential audience? We want to find the subset of landowners within the focal geography that are most likely to engage in sustainable forest management, including Forest Stewardship landowners. Follow best practices learned in the Piney Woods and Driftless projects We know that micro-targeting of forest landowners can substantially increase the efficiency of outreach and enhance the likelihood of subsequent forest management actions.What are the steps? Landowners identified in the potential audience will be contacted utilizing messages calibrated based on their interests, to motivate real measurable conservation actions on their land.AFF will utilize ATFS Inspecting Foresters to conduct field visits and provide expert advice. In addition to the landowner outreach noted above, this project will identify lands certified to the SFI Standard, within the target geography, and inform SFI participating companies of the extent of ecological priority areas, and potential opportunities for longleaf and other ecological restoration.  What will be the results? Identify landowners who opt to participate in certification Landowners not yet ready for certification could be led toward deepened engagement in forestry by being encouraged to join local and state efforts, or by being offered MyLandPlan (an AFF online resource for forestland owners just beginning to engage). This process as a whole, assures that all participating landowners would be within a priority geographical area and thus contribute to landscape condition. Because the proposed landscape area will most likely fall within a Significant Geographic Area within the range of longleaf pine, it should be expected that foresters would appropriately identify special areas, and potential longleaf restoration opportunities during the course of field visits and management planning.
  • Where are we now??Barriers and benefits – TBDStrategies to overcome barriers – TBDPilot & full campaign implementation – TBDEvaluation & Sustaining - TBD Early stages of this project bringing together AFF, SFI and the NC Tree Farm Program in a coordinated outreach project to build Certification and have an ecological impact in a targeted area.Purpose: Get landowners on a pathway to sustainable forest management Motivate landowners who are already actively managing their land to attain ATFS CertificationEcological and Economic Lens: Ecological driver: Longleaf conservation and restoration Economic driver: Increase Certified fiber in a specific woodshedHow will we identify the core geographic areas of focus for this project? Roughly established using the North Carolina Significant Geographic Areas (as identified in America’s Longleaf Conservation Plan) Added a layer of State Forest Stewardship Landowners Added a layer of woodshed boundaries of participating SFI partnersLandowners within this focal geography constitute the potential audience.How will we segment the potential audience? We want to find the subset of landowners within the focal geography that are most likely to engage in sustainable forest management, including Forest Stewardship landowners. Follow best practices learned in the Piney Woods and Driftless projects We know that micro-targeting of forest landowners can substantially increase the efficiency of outreach and enhance the likelihood of subsequent forest management actions.What are the steps? Landowners identified in the potential audience will be contacted utilizing messages calibrated based on their interests, to motivate real measurable conservation actions on their land.AFF will utilize ATFS Inspecting Foresters to conduct field visits and provide expert advice. In addition to the landowner outreach noted above, this project will identify lands certified to the SFI Standard, within the target geography, and inform SFI participating companies of the extent of ecological priority areas, and potential opportunities for longleaf and other ecological restoration.  What will be the results? Identify landowners who opt to participate in certification Landowners not yet ready for certification could be led toward deepened engagement in forestry by being encouraged to join local and state efforts, or by being offered MyLandPlan (an AFF online resource for forestland owners just beginning to engage). This process as a whole, assures that all participating landowners would be within a priority geographical area and thus contribute to landscape condition. Because the proposed landscape area will most likely fall within a Significant Geographic Area within the range of longleaf pine, it should be expected that foresters would appropriately identify special areas, and potential longleaf restoration opportunities during the course of field visits and management planning.
  • Partnership between the Vermont Woodland Association and the American Forest Foundation – ATFSIncrease woodland stewardship in Vermont by reaching and motivating unengaged woodland owners to join the American Tree Farm System.Ecological Outcome: Increase woodland stewardship in Vermont.Landowner action: Have an ATFS Inspector visit your property and enroll in the American Tree Farm System.Landowners most likely to be interested: Vermont family forest owners with 10 acres or more. Identify unengaged woodland owners using the typical profile of existing Vermont Woodland Association members.Barriers and benefits, strategies, pilot test, etc. are TBD.Where are we now? AFF is conducting a market analysis for delivery in April. This report will include: The number and geographic spread of prime prospects in the state of Vermont. Description of the profile of these woodland owners such as what their interests are, where they tend to obtain news and information generally and specific to their land, as well as what types of messages and messengers are likely to resonate with them. From there, Vermont Woodand Association and AFF will determine the next steps.
  • Now we want you to take what you have just learned and work through a sample outcome and action in small groups. This will help solidify the different social marketing steps and provide you with immediate learnings you can take back home.To put people in small groups, we will have each person pick a number between 1-4 (from slips of paper in a jar). The different groups are listed around the room. Some groups can move into the lobby to talk.  Each group will focus on a different outcome and action that is provided to them. Using a facilitator they will walk through the behavior change process and answer questions for each section. If the group quickly moves through the exercise using the action we provided, you can walk through the process again with a second action of their choosing.  At the end, each group will be given 3 minutes to report out their ideas for one of the actions discussed.
  • Here are the questions we want you to walk through in your group. They are also on the paper we will hand out in your group.
  • Integrate these ideas into grant applicationsLearn about your audienceLook at MyBestSegments and the SFFI websiteDo a quick surveyLook at state forest action plansDo a pilot/test messagesEven a small focus group with your friends at church is better than nothingFind time and resources to evaluate successFind student interns that need a project to help you outShare lessons learned to build body of knowledgeWe want you to leave today feeling comfortable implementing some of these strategies.
  • Reminder:Mention post-testPrize to those that have another strategy example to sharePick Door Prize Winner
  • Transcript

    • 1. Engaging Woodland Owners National Leadership Conference February 19, 2014 K Rossbow
    • 2. Today’s Agenda • Learn about social marketing, segmenting your audience and picking the right message, channel and messenger • Learn from Impact Center projects how to integrate these ideas into future grant applications • Use what you learn in a small case study setting • Q&A and review strategies that could be used immediately at home
    • 3. The Landscape • 22M landowners, 7M with 10+ acres • All with different values, attitudes and reasons for owning their land • Increasing threats demand greater management • Limited marketing dollars • Traditional approaches not highly effective
    • 4. Targeted Outreach • Oak Hickory Region of Southwest WI • Longleaf Pine in Southeast MS 13% response rates 90% unengaged landowners 20% additional action LearnNC.org
    • 5. What does the Impact Center do? • Helps AFF and partners be more effective at getting unengaged landowners actively managing their land to achieve conservation and economic outcomes American Forest Foundation 5
    • 6. How do we work with partners? • Help identify: 1. Specific outcomes 2. Landowner actions to be taken 3. Landowners most likely to be interested in taking action 4. The barriers to completing action 5. The strategies to overcome those barriers 6. Evaluation and sustaining methods 6
    • 7. Building the Knowledge Base Projects Share lessons learned Refine strategies Evaluate results Cumulative knowledge
    • 8. Behavior Change Overview • Conservation Psychology, Behavioral Economics, Environmental Literacy, Social Marketing • “Fostering Sustainable Behavior” • Origins in social science research • Localized, step-by-step, data-driven process • Removes barriers and enhance benefits • Outcomes not Outputs
    • 9. Cycle of Engagement Discovery New knowledge Awareness Evaluate Choose action Implement action
    • 10. Social Marketing Steps • Identify: 1. Specific outcomes 2. Landowner actions to be taken/ behavior desired 3. Landowners most likely to be interested 4. The barriers and benefits to completing action 5. The strategies to overcome those barriers 6. A Pilot & full campaign implementation system 7. Evaluation & sustaining methods
    • 11. IDENTIFY OUTCOMES & ACTIONS
    • 12. IDENTIFY THOSE MOST INTERESTED
    • 13. Target Audiences Traditional Approach: Assumes people are all alike Therefore, create one approach for everyone Segmentation Approach: Assumes that people are different Therefore, create different approaches for different groups Targets “general population” Targets audience “Retirees” Targets audience “Traditionally Underserved” Targets audience “New England” Adapted from Jenny Kohr, CDC
    • 14. Traditional Approach: Do the same thing for everyone, target the “general public.” Example: Get more landowners to do oak restoration. I have not found a trusted forester to help me with oak restoration. I like my woods just the way they are. We will participate if we are given a financial incentive to do so. I don’t have time to learn how to do oak restoration. Adapted from Jenny Kohr, CDC
    • 15. Segmentation Approach: Breaks people into homogeneous groups and tailors programs and messages to each group I have not found a trusted forester ... We will participate if given a financial incentive Approach: Provide list of foresters with testimonials Approach: Provide info on various grants I don’t have time to learn how to plant oak. Approach: Provide ready to do steps, templates, concrete examples I like my woods just the way they are. Approach: Have stories of how other landowners have grown oak and improved wildlife, etc Adapted from Jenny Kohr, CDC
    • 16. http://www.engaginglandowners.org/new-landownerresearch/landowners-your-area/select-landowner-profiles
    • 17. http://www.claritas.com/MyBestSegments/Default.jsp
    • 18. First of its Kind Demographic Data Attitude & Behavior Info Comm Channels Conservation Info
    • 19. IDENTIFY BARRIERS & BENEFITS
    • 20. Identify Barriers & Benefits • Literature Review • Qualitative Research – Observational studies – Focus groups • Surveys PASA Farming
    • 21. STRATEGY TOOLS TO OVERCOME BARRIERS
    • 22. Strategy Tools Communication Commitment Prompts Social Norms Convenience Feedback
    • 23. Reduce Barriers-Enhance Benefits Action Research
    • 24. PILOT & FULL CAMPAIGN IMPLEMENTATION
    • 25. EVALUATION & SUSTAINING METHODS
    • 26. Piney Woods Example Social Marketing Steps Use in Piney Woods Specific outcomes • Increase forest management • Increase longleaf conservation Landowner actions to be taken/ behavior desired • Respond to message/offer • Receive information packet • Accept a visit from professional forester • Accept a visit from a wildlife biologist Landowners most likely to be interested • Landowners >100 acres • Woodland retreat owners • Most interested in wildlife and income • Information packets
    • 27. Piney Woods Example Social Marketing Steps Use in Piney Woods The barriers and benefits to completing action • Focus groups to identify main issues • Surveys to Identify/verify barriers The strategies to overcome those barriers • Science team • Advisory committee • Working group A Pilot & full campaign implementation system • Pilots are ongoing • Full campaign is one year away Evaluation & sustaining methods • Communication with partners • Utilize team structure
    • 28. North Carolina: Motivating Conservation and ATFS Certification in Priority Ecological Areas in Partnership with SFI and NC Tree Farm
    • 29. North Carolina: Motivating Conservation and ATFS Certification in Priority Ecological Areas in Partnership with SFI and NC Tree Farm Social Marketing Steps Use in North Carolina Specific outcomes • Increase Certified Tree Farms • Engage with landowners who are not yet ready for Certification Landowner actions to be taken/ behavior desired • Have an ATFS Inspector visit your property and get Certified • Sign up for MyLandPlan.org and set a goal for your property Landowners most likely to be interested • State Forest Stewardship landowner data
    • 30. Vermont: Increasing woodland stewardship by reaching and motivating landowners to join the American Tree Farm System
    • 31. Small Group Discussion 1 2 3 4 Outcome Increase engagement of Certified Tree Farmers in your state Develop new relationships with unengaged landowners Increase inspector corps’ affinity towards ATFS Improve the financial status of the state Tree Farm committee Facilitator Chris Bettina Sara Jennifer
    • 32. Small Group Discussion Questions 1.What action would you like taken to reach desired outcome? 2.Who is your targeted, segmented audience? 3.What barriers and benefits are there towards the desired action? 4.What strategy did you choose to engage the participant and overcome barriers? 5.How will you evaluate success? 6.How will you sustain relationship/interest?
    • 33. Small Group Discussion Report Out 1.What action would you like taken to reach desired outcome? 2.Who is your targeted, segmented audience? 3.What barriers and benefits are there towards the desired action? 4.What strategy did you choose to engage the participant and overcome barriers? 5.How will you evaluate success? 6.How will you sustain relationship/interest?
    • 34. Questions MyRivendell
    • 35. Immediate Take-Aways • Integrate these ideas into grant applications • Learn about your audience • Do a pilot/test messages • Find time and resources to evaluate success • Share lessons learned to build body of knowledge
    • 36. Resources 1. This presentation – http://slideshare.net/kdennings – kdennings@forestfoundation.org, 919-355-8102 2. Community Based Social Marketing website – http://www.cbsm.com/ 3. Social Marketing to protect the environment book – http://www.sagepub.com/books/Book235188 4. Tools of Change training http://www.toolsofchange.com/en/home/ 5. iSMA - http://www.i-socialmarketing.org/ 6. Listserv - SOC-MKTG@georgetown.edu

    ×