Session 3 mise en-scene: Film Appreciation Course

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  • Session 3 mise en-scene: Film Appreciation Course

    1. 1. Mise-en-Scene Bong S. Eliab Hum 3: Film Appreciation Mass Communication Department
    2. 2. Mise-en-Scene  “Our most sharply etched memories of the cinema.”  “Overall design of a setting can significantly shape how we understand story action.” - Bordwell and Thompson Note the backdrop (setting) of “The Road Home”; wooden fences, huts, small dusty roads, the clothes they Di and Zhao wear.
    3. 3. Mise-en-scene  “having been put into the scene”  Visual aspects that appear within a single shot
    4. 4. Mise-en-Scene  perceived elements that are recorded by the camera: objects, movements, lighting, shadows, colors, shots, movement of the camera, sound, editing Holly Hunter and Anna Paquin in a scene of “The Piano”; note the perceived elements in the mise-en-scene
    5. 5. Mise-en-Scene  Setting: not merely a backdrop against which the story is told  Setting: engages dynamically with the narrative.Peter Jackson directing Watts in King Kong; explaining the mise-en-scene
    6. 6. Director’s Style  Director’s control over mise-en-scene  Capacity of the director to control what happen on the set.
    7. 7. Elements of Mise-en-scene  Setting  Props  Costume  Performance and Movement  Lighting  Camera and Camera Movement  Editing  Sound
    8. 8. Setting  1920s-1940s: studio  Studio: elements controlled and chosen  Signifier of authenticity in 1920s  Wilderness  Small town  Large ranch
    9. 9. Setting  Functions to place the character within a film  Functions to create a space and meaning
    10. 10. Props  Device for conveying meaning  Define the genre  Weapons: action genre  Garlic/ crosses: horror films  Unique signifiers of meaning  Objects on C.U./ Dialogue  Significance of object in the narrative
    11. 11. Props  Used to anchor characters into particular meaning  Hannibal Lecter: face guard (Silence of Lambs)  The Godfather: props in relation to family’s honor
    12. 12. Costume  Variant of prop, tightly connected to character  Minor characters: use codes of everyday life (uniforms)  Cinematic Codes: white for good guys/ black for villainy
    13. 13. Costume  Subtle changes of character’s costume: changes in status, attitude or passing of time  Signifies mismatches:  A costume calls for a series of expectation  Police: in robbery scene  Cross-Dressing: a make in female clothing
    14. 14. Performance and Movement  Richest source of mise-en-scene: actor’s performance  Performer: object of the camera’s gaze
    15. 15. Performance and Movement  Body Language: strong coded elements in the facial expressions and body positions held by the performers
    16. 16. Body Language  Part of everyday life  Universal  Cultural/ temporal variations  Thumbs up  High Five
    17. 17. Performance  Presentation of characters by the actors using body language  Dustin Hoffman in Rain Man  Tom Hanks in Forrest Gump
    18. 18. Body Movements  Body movements: can be used to express a change of emotion and a passage of time
    19. 19. Star Factor  Brings to the film a meaning derived from their presence  Brings a level of expectation and implied meaning in their previous film
    20. 20. Type-Casting  Part of film language  Type-casting of a star: having meaning can be stretched and re-used, but only to a limited extent
    21. 21. Other Elements  Lighting  Camera and Camera Movement  Editing  Sound

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