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  • The Future of Computers
    http://www.rfreitas.com/Nano/TheFutureOfComputers--Analog--March1996.htm (c) 1996 Robert A. Freitas Jr.Research ScientistZyvex Corp. Citation: Robert A. Freitas Jr., “The Future of Computers,” Analog 116(March 1996):57-73.
  • Cooper first cellular mobile phone in 1973
    In simple terms, Moore’s Law states that the number of transistors that can be packed on an integrated electronic circuit doubles approximately every 2 years
    (ftp://download.intel.com/research/silicon/moorespaper.pdf
    ) enabling a size: price: performance ratio of smaller, cheaper and more powerful micro electronics. Law of Disruption states that “social, political, and economic systems change incrementally, but technology changes exponentially
    Metcalfe’s Law Value of a network increases proportionally with the square of the number of connections
  • Cooper first cellular mobile phone in 1973
    In simple terms, Moore’s Law states that the number of transistors that can be packed on an integrated electronic circuit doubles approximately every 2 years
    (ftp://download.intel.com/research/silicon/moorespaper.pdf
    ) enabling a size: price: performance ratio of smaller, cheaper and more powerful micro electronics. Law of Disruption states that “social, political, and economic systems change incrementally, but technology changes exponentially
    Metcalfe’s Law Value of a network increases proportionally with the square of the number of connections
  • The goal of the Smart Dust project is to build a self-contained, millimeter-scale sensing and communication platform for a massively distributed sensor network.  This device will be around the size of a grain of sand and will contain sensors, computational ability, bi-directional wireless communications, and a power supply, while being inexpensive enough to deploy by the hundreds.  The science and engineering goal of the project is to build a complete, complex system in a tiny volume using state-of-the art technologies (as opposed to futuristic technologies), which will require evolutionary and revolutionary advances in integration, miniaturization, and energy management.  We forsee many applications for this technology:
    Weather/seismological monitoring on Mars
    Internal spacecraft monitoring
    Land/space comm. networks
    Chemical/biological sensors
    Weapons stockpile monitoring
    Defense-related sensor networks
    Inventory Control
    Product quality monitoring
    Smart office spaces
    Sports - sailing, balls
    For more information, see the main Smart Dust page at http://robotics.eecs.berkeley.edu/~pister/SmartDust and read our publications (see navigation button above).
    Brief description of the operation of the mote:
    The Smart Dust mote is run by a microcontroller that not only determines the tasks performed by the mote, but controls power to the various components of the system to conserve energy. Periodically the microcontroller gets a reading from one of the sensors, which measure one of a number of physical or chemical stimuli such as temperature, ambient light, vibration, acceleration, or air pressure, processes the data, and stores it in memory. It also occasionally turns on the optical receiver to see if anyone is trying to communicate with it. This communication may include new programs or messages from other motes. In response to a message or upon its own initiative the microcontroller will use the corner cube retroreflector or laser to transmit sensor data or a message to a base station or another mote.
    Longer description of the operation of the mote:
    The primary constraint in the design of the Smart Dust motes is volume, which in turn puts a severe constraint on energy since we do not have much room for batteries or large solar cells. Thus, the motes must operate efficiently and conserve energy whenever possible. Most of the time, the majority of the mote is powered off with only a clock and a few timers running. When a timer expires, it powers up a part of the mote to carry out a job, then powers off. A few of the timers control the sensors that measure one of a number of physical or chemical stimuli such as temperature, ambient light, vibration, acceleration, or air pressure. When one of these timers expires, it powers up the corresponding sensor, takes a sample, and converts it to a digital word. If the data is interesting, it may either be stored directly in the SRAM or the microcontroller is powered up to perform more complex operations with it. When this task is complete, everything is again powered down and the timer begins counting again.
    Another timer controls the receiver. When that timer expires, the receiver powers up and looks for an incoming packet. If it doesn't see one after a certain length of time, it is powered down again. The mote can receive several types of packets, including ones that are new program code that is stored in the program memory. This allows the user to change the behavior of the mote remotely. Packets may also include messages from the base station or other motes. When one of these is received, the microcontroller is powered up and used to interpret the contents of the message. The message may tell the mote to do something in particular, or it may be a message that is just being passed from one mote to another on its way to a particular destination. In response to a message or to another timer expiring, the microcontroller will assemble a packet containing sensor data or a message and transmit it using either the corner cube retroreflector or the laser diode, depending on which it has. The corner cube retroreflector transmits information just by moving a mirror and thus changing the reflection of a laser beam from the base station. This technique is substantially more energy efficient than actually generating some radiation. With the laser diode and a set of beam scanning mirrors, we can transmit data in any direction desired, allowing the mote to communicate with other Smart Dust motes.
  • M2M is a category of Information and Computing Technology (ICT) that combines network, computer, software, sensor and power technologies to enable remote human and machine interaction with physical, chemical and biological systems and processes. M2M has many synonyms including “pervasive computing”, “hidden computing”, “invisible computing” and “ubiquitous computing.”
    Reach out and touch someone or squeeze someone or…An accelerometer on the wrist-worn device allows rough detection of hand orientation, gesture measurement, and tapping. In the near future researchers will examine simple activity detection as well, such as sitting, walking, and standing.
    As in the bus stop example, a person wearing the device can sense simple touching. This sensation is enabled through force-sensing resistors that provide pressure detection over a high-resolution surface array on the top of the device.
    A person can also detect rich signals sent from a partner whirling a finger along the surface of his or her device. Researchers provided this effect by time stamping the sensed data.
    Motes, such as the one amongst the candy corn above, are at the heart of several Intel research projects. 
    Not only might a wearer experience the simulated touch of a friend, she might also feel the device grow warm to her skin. Using a Peltier Junction, the device can create a subtle heating or cooling on the wearer’s skin.
    “The mapping between the inputs and outputs of paired devices is not literal,” says Paulos. “This is an important part of the design. In the same way people developed a language of numbers around early pagers when they sent messages we believe a similar vocabulary will emerge around physical cues.”
    For example, to some wearers a gentle warming on the skin might convey a message of friendship. Others might choose to send good vibes by…well by sending good vibes, literally. Intel researchers used simple flat pancake vibration motors to cause wearers to easily and privately feel vibrations though skin contact. Various vibration patterns and duty cycles provide a number of output possibilities for the device.
    And for those times when good vibes just aren’t enough, a wearer of the device can send the equivalent of a wireless handhold, an electronic squeeze.
    Through the use of Flexinol, a user can feel a little squeeze that mimics the grasp of a hand as the filament in the wrist-worn device contracts when electrically powered. Flexinol is a simple variant of Nitinol, which is often used in robotic applications and commonly referred to as “muscle wire” for its ability to exert force and return to its original shape.
    For all the pleasant thoughts and human analogies there may be a dark side to this device. “Imagine someone incessantly tapping, tapping, tapping. You’d probably feel really annoyed,” says Paulos. “It could be your friend trying to get in touch with you. Or perhaps you’re on the receiving end of a lovers’ quarrel.”
    “Yea,” says Paulos, “there is an eerie side to this device. I don’t think anyone want to know what spam feels like.”
  • M2M is a category of Information and Computing Technology (ICT) that combines network, computer, software, sensor and power technologies to enable remote human and machine interaction with physical, chemical and biological systems and processes. M2M has many synonyms including “pervasive computing”, “hidden computing”, “invisible computing” and “ubiquitous computing.”
    Reach out and touch someone or squeeze someone or…An accelerometer on the wrist-worn device allows rough detection of hand orientation, gesture measurement, and tapping. In the near future researchers will examine simple activity detection as well, such as sitting, walking, and standing.
    As in the bus stop example, a person wearing the device can sense simple touching. This sensation is enabled through force-sensing resistors that provide pressure detection over a high-resolution surface array on the top of the device.
    A person can also detect rich signals sent from a partner whirling a finger along the surface of his or her device. Researchers provided this effect by time stamping the sensed data.
    Motes, such as the one amongst the candy corn above, are at the heart of several Intel research projects. 
    Not only might a wearer experience the simulated touch of a friend, she might also feel the device grow warm to her skin. Using a Peltier Junction, the device can create a subtle heating or cooling on the wearer’s skin.
    “The mapping between the inputs and outputs of paired devices is not literal,” says Paulos. “This is an important part of the design. In the same way people developed a language of numbers around early pagers when they sent messages we believe a similar vocabulary will emerge around physical cues.”
    For example, to some wearers a gentle warming on the skin might convey a message of friendship. Others might choose to send good vibes by…well by sending good vibes, literally. Intel researchers used simple flat pancake vibration motors to cause wearers to easily and privately feel vibrations though skin contact. Various vibration patterns and duty cycles provide a number of output possibilities for the device.
    And for those times when good vibes just aren’t enough, a wearer of the device can send the equivalent of a wireless handhold, an electronic squeeze.
    Through the use of Flexinol, a user can feel a little squeeze that mimics the grasp of a hand as the filament in the wrist-worn device contracts when electrically powered. Flexinol is a simple variant of Nitinol, which is often used in robotic applications and commonly referred to as “muscle wire” for its ability to exert force and return to its original shape.
    For all the pleasant thoughts and human analogies there may be a dark side to this device. “Imagine someone incessantly tapping, tapping, tapping. You’d probably feel really annoyed,” says Paulos. “It could be your friend trying to get in touch with you. Or perhaps you’re on the receiving end of a lovers’ quarrel.”
    “Yea,” says Paulos, “there is an eerie side to this device. I don’t think anyone want to know what spam feels like.”
  • Anti depressant, AIDS and Parkinsons dry mouth effects speech and sleepDentist and engineer
  • http://www.robotdirectory.org/pics/cakemonster/Nano-Scoop3.jpg
  • The Age of Spiritual Machines – When Computers Exceed Human Intelligence
    The Singularity Is Near : When Humans Transcend Biology
  • ., all integrated through the design process. The key to success in mechatronics is: modeling, analysis, experimentation & hardware-implementation skills.
  • As early as 1999, the number of embedded microprocessors found in the average middle-class household in North America was 45 and the number of embedded microprocessors manufactured surpassed the number of microprocessors packaged inside of traditional computers such as PCs by a factor of 100 to 1 (Lewis, 2001, p. 1).
  • As early as 1999, the number of embedded microprocessors found in the average middle-class household in North America was 45 and the number of embedded microprocessors manufactured surpassed the number of microprocessors packaged inside of traditional computers such as PCs by a factor of 100 to 1 (Lewis, 2001, p. 1).
  • As early as 1999, the number of embedded microprocessors found in the average middle-class household in North America was 45 and the number of embedded microprocessors manufactured surpassed the number of microprocessors packaged inside of traditional computers such as PCs by a factor of 100 to 1 (Lewis, 2001, p. 1).
  • As early as 1999, the number of embedded microprocessors found in the average middle-class household in North America was 45 and the number of embedded microprocessors manufactured surpassed the number of microprocessors packaged inside of traditional computers such as PCs by a factor of 100 to 1 (Lewis, 2001, p. 1).
  • Rice and U of Susses (Kroto)
  • Online List Details 200+ First Generation Nano Products Available Today on Store Shelves and via Internet WASHINGTON, March 10 /PRNewswire/ -- The Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars today launched The Nanotechnology Consumer Products Inventory. This is the first and only publicly accessible online inventory of nanotechnology consumer products. The inventory currently contains information on 212 manufacturer-identified nano products. This far exceeds the existing federal government-accepted estimate of approximately 80 consumer products. The inventory can be accessed at no cost online at http://www.nanotechproject.org/consumerproducts. The inventory furthers the Project on Emerging Nanotechnology's mission to encourage discussion about nanotechnology's benefits and its promise, as well as its safety and environmental impacts. Currently, the searchable database catalogs consumer products using nanotechnology or containing nano materials - - from sunscreens to refrigerators and cultured diamonds. While not complete, it is the most comprehensive repository of nanotechnology consumer products available to the public, policymakers, and industry. "We are at the vanguard of discovering the endless benefits of nanotechnology for applications like targeted cancer treatments and more efficient solar cells. With this inventory, we also are learning that this technology is already being incorporated into our daily lives. It's on store shelves and being sold in every part of the world," said David Rejeski, director of the Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies, which is supported by The Pew Charitable Trusts. Until now, there was no known broad list of specific products using or containing nanotechnology that was readily accessible to consumers, retailers, researchers, and the media. The U.S. government relies on data compiled by EmTech Research regarding how nanotechnology is marketed and used commercially. The Project's inventory was developed in response to consumer interest in nanotechnology and its commercial uses. It provides the public with a first look at the vast array of acknowledged products companies are currently making available to shoppers. Findings Beginning in 2005, the Project began compiling products and materials containing nanotechnology from around the globe for inclusion in the consumer inventory. Entry to the list is based primarily on online, English language information provided by the product manufacturers. It does not include nanotechnology consumer products which companies have not identified as such. With these caveats, notable findings from the data in the inventory include: * Health and fitness is the most robust category in the inventory, with 125 products to-date, everything from face creams to hockey sticks. Electronics and computers make up the second largest category with 30 products, followed by the home and garden category; * Within the health and fitness category, clothing -- such as stain- resistant shirts, pants and neckties -- constitutes the largest sub- category with 34 products, followed closely by sporting goods (33 products) and cosmetics (31 products); * The U.S. is the overwhelming leader in consumer nanotechnology product development with 126; East Asia and Europe follow with 42 and 35 nano products respectively; and * Nanoengineered carbon is the most common material used in the nano products included within the inventory, followed by silver and silica. "Nanotechnology's potential is vast and it's real. The opportunity for nanotechnology ranges from improving Olympic sports equipment to discovering better treatments for Alzheimer's disease," said Andrew Maynard, science advisor of the Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies. "But our ability to reap the long-term benefits of nanotechnology -- in areas from energy production to medicine -- will depend on how well industry and government manage the safety and performance of this first generation of products." About Nanotechnology Nanotechnology is the ability to measure, see, manipulate and manufacture things usually between 1 and 100 nanometers. A nanometer is one billionth of a meter; a human hair is roughly 100,000 nanometers wide. The National Science Foundation predicts that the global marketplace for goods and services using nanotechnologies will grow to $1 trillion by 2015. The U.S. invests approximately $3 billion annually in nanotechnology research and development, which accounts for approximately one-third of the total public and private sector investments worldwide. Inventory Data Every item contained in the inventory is manufacturer-identified. Any statements, claims and views expressed by a manufacturer or third-party contained in this inventory are solely those of the party making the statement or claim. Product details include: the product name, company/manufacturer or supplier information, country of origin, and category or subcategory, as well as a product photograph and description, hyperlink to the product website and the date that the product was added to the index. Products are grouped according to categories based loosely on publicly available consumer product classification systems, which include health and fitness, electronics and computers, home and garden, food and beverage, automotive, appliances and children's goods. The inventory also uses sub- categories. For example, paint is a sub-category labeled under the home and garden main category. The inventory will be updated regularly as new information is available. Users are encouraged to submit new product information for consideration to nano@wilsoncenter.org. Special Launch Event and Webcast The Center will formally release the Nanotechnology Consumer Products Inventory at a special launch event today from 2:00 - 3:00 p.m. EST at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, located at 1300 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C., 5th floor conference room. The event will be webcast live at http://www.wilsoncenter.org/nano. High resolution photos of products in the nanotechnology consumer products inventory are available to the media at ftp://wwicsftp.wilsoncenter.org Username: WWICSFtp Password: p+F$c1WW. Questions regarding photos should be directed to Alex Parlini: alex.parlini@wilsoncenter.org or (202) 691-4282. The Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies is an initiative launched by the Wilson Center and The Pew Charitable Trusts in 2005. It is dedicated to helping business, government and the public anticipate and manage possible health and environmental implications of nanotechnology. For more information about the project, log on to http://www.nanotechproject.org. Contact: Debra Masters Phone: (202) 326-1821 debra.masters@edelman.com Julia A. Moore Phone: (202) 691-4025 julia.moore@wilsoncenter.org SOURCE Woodrow Wilson International Center for ScholarsWeb Site: http://www.wilsoncenter.orghttp://www.nanotechproject.org
  • <number>
  • <number>
    Clusters are economic in nature not geographic in nature.
    Focused on areas of concentration of core industries.
    Will be expanding efforts to make the connection to the clusters by assisting regions like West Texas with regional collaboration, SWOT assessment, and identification of targets of opportunity.
    Regional initiatives expand the focus to ancillary and support industries.
  • Korean “Information Society” development date back to the 1980’s, however, Information, Communication and Technology (ICT) use and production in the past has been associated with equipment, rather than knowledge-intensive production and services such as software, biotechnology, new media and information services (Hwang, Hur and Choi, 2004, p.11) (Korea National Computerization Agency, 2004, p.7) (Wong, 2004, p.1). A new phase of public-private partnership including programs such as “Cyber Korea 21”, “e-Korea Vision 2006”, and “Broadband IT KOREA VISION 2007” aims to make Korea the leading exporter of knowledge-intensive production in the world (Korea National Computerization Agency, 2004, p.7) (The Korea Times in Swiss Talents, 2004, p.1). This new phase is marked by a transition to integrating convergent information services into the fabric of society, industry, government and education; pioneering the development of technologies, products, services and knowledge-based exports; and supporting the formation and development of new convergence companies.
  • Korean “Information Society” development date back to the 1980’s, however, Information, Communication and Technology (ICT) use and production in the past has been associated with equipment, rather than knowledge-intensive production and services such as software, biotechnology, new media and information services (Hwang, Hur and Choi, 2004, p.11) (Korea National Computerization Agency, 2004, p.7) (Wong, 2004, p.1). A new phase of public-private partnership including programs such as “Cyber Korea 21”, “e-Korea Vision 2006”, and “Broadband IT KOREA VISION 2007” aims to make Korea the leading exporter of knowledge-intensive production in the world (Korea National Computerization Agency, 2004, p.7) (The Korea Times in Swiss Talents, 2004, p.1). This new phase is marked by a transition to integrating convergent information services into the fabric of society, industry, government and education; pioneering the development of technologies, products, services and knowledge-based exports; and supporting the formation and development of new convergence companies.
  • <number>
    You can find all of TWC’s tools, with the exception of SitesonTexas at the TWC web-site - www.twc.state.tx.us
  • The Future of Computers
    http://www.rfreitas.com/Nano/TheFutureOfComputers--Analog--March1996.htm (c) 1996 Robert A. Freitas Jr.Research ScientistZyvex Corp. Citation: Robert A. Freitas Jr., “The Future of Computers,” Analog 116(March 1996):57-73.
  • The Future of Computers
    http://www.rfreitas.com/Nano/TheFutureOfComputers--Analog--March1996.htm (c) 1996 Robert A. Freitas Jr.Research ScientistZyvex Corp. Citation: Robert A. Freitas Jr., “The Future of Computers,” Analog 116(March 1996):57-73.

Transcript

  • 1. 1
  • 2. SuperComputing 95 Teraflop Challenge 1996, $100 million 2001, $1,000,000 2011, $1000 2021, $1 The Future of Computers 1996 Robert A. Freitas Jr., Research Scientist, Zyvex Corp.
  • 3. TERAFLOP SUPER COMPUTERS for $300 today!
  • 4. 2
  • 5. Copyright 2005, Garrett Wollman. All rights reserved. Photograph taken 2005-06-08. http://gallery.bostonradio.org/2005-06/boston/100-02978-lrg.html
  • 6. http://www.newtek.com/ The features of a television live truck in a 10-pound box for $4,995.
  • 7. 3
  • 8. http://www.arraycomm.com/pcct/coopers_law.htm Cooper’s Law Martin Cooper’s Law - the no. of conversations (voice and data) conducted over a given area, in all of the useful radio spectrum has doubled every 21/2 years for the last 105 years since Marconi, 1895.
  • 9. EV-DO data travels over the network at typical speeds of 300 to 500 kilobits per second. EV-DO can theoretically hit data transmission rates of 2.4 megabits per second. http://www.ipma-wa.com/exec_sem/2005/bruno.ppt#14
  • 10. 4
  • 11. 1st Gen  Mainframe 2nd Gen Mini 3rd Gen PC 4th Gen Sys on Chip
  • 12. http://www-bsac.eecs.berkeley.edu/archive/users/warneke-brett/SmartDust/ Berkeley’s Golem Dust 11.7 mm3 total circumscribed volume ~4.8 mm3 total displaced volume Berkeley’s Deputy Dust 6.6 mm3 total circumscribed volume 4th Gen 11.7 mm3 6.6 mm3
  • 13. My daughter’s first computer at age 1 hour.
  • 14. http://shino8.eng.uci.edu/Pdf/Tomo_MIT_Mems.pdfintel-research.net/ berkeley/features/tiny_db.asp Berkeley Motes/berkeley.intel-research.net/paulos/research/connexus/ www-bsac.eecs.berkeley.edu/archive/users/warneke-brett/SmartDust/ 6 Pack for $120 on the web from xbow.com Time to Market
  • 15. http://shino8.eng.uci.edu/Pdf/Tomo_MIT_Mems.pdf intel-research.net/ berkeley/features/tiny_db.asp /berkeley.intel-research.net/paulos/research/connexus/ Intel/Berkeley Connexus www-bsac.eecs.berkeley.edu/archive/users/warneke-brett/SmartDust/ Berkeley Motes New H2H Relations
  • 16. Integrates sensors, batteries, a control chip, and an RF transmitter in a 35mm-long housing. Lab-in-a-Pill http://www.olympus.co.jp/en/news/2004b/nr041130capsle.cfm University of Glasgow Capsule Endoscope Examine the lining of the middle part of your gastrointestinal tract, which includes the three portions of the small intestine (duodenum, jejunum, ileum).
  • 17. “Dentist and engineer partner in Israel.” MIT Technology Review, January, 2005 New H2M Relations
  • 18. MIT Tech Review, 2005 Sensors Physical Chemical Biological http://www.rieti.go.jp/en/events/bbl/03102801.pdf , page 16 Actuators Physical Chemical Biological PhiloMetron™
  • 19. MIT Tech Review, 2005 This is a ROBOT http://www.rieti.go.jp/en/events/bbl/03102801.pdf , page 16
  • 20. “Robots at same stage as 1978 PCs.” --Baylor University, Carbonara and Korpi Machine Actors v v
  • 21. www.kurzweilai.net/.../ SIN_headshot_highres.html “An analysis of the history of technology shows that technological change is exponential, contrary to the common-sense ‘intuitive linear’ view. So we won't experience 100 years of progress in the 21st century -- it will be more like 20,000 years of progress (at today's rate)… because we're doubling the rate of progress every decade, we'll see a century of progress--at today's rate--in only 25 calendar years.” Kurzweil, KurzweilAI.net, March 7, 2001.
  • 22. What science and technology innovations have changed the world in the past 100 years?
  • 23. • What forces are driving this pace of innovation? • How are Texas competitors and Texas organizing to create innovation, wealth and human capital?
  • 24. 1
  • 25. Mechatronics The synergistic combination of mechanical engineering, electronics, control systems and computers. Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering Departments at RPI All Contents Copyright(C) 2001 Mechatronics Lab at RPI
  • 26. Automotive
  • 27. Energy-CHP
  • 28. http://www.adidas.com/campaigns/adidas_1/content/downloads/adidas_1- wp_02_1280_1024.jpg http://www.adidasprlookbook.com/adidas1/index.asp • 1,000th of a second sensor measures gap between heel and a magnet • 20-MHz microcontroller measures changes in compression • Motor spins at 4000 rpm turns a screw loosens cable • Environmentally and operator adaptive shoe sole
  • 29. (Harbor Research, 2003)
  • 30. (Harbor Research, 2003) 1994 - 2004
  • 31. (Harbor Research, 2003)
  • 32. (Harbor Research, 2003) 2004 - 2014
  • 33. 2
  • 34. Adapted from Charles Ostman Senior Fellow Institute for Global Futures NEURO NANO BIOINFO
  • 35. Adapted from Charles Ostman Senior Fellow Institute for Global Futures NEURO NANO BIOINFO S&T Convergence
  • 36. Micro-robotics team and biologists at Tsukuba University Source: The Guardian Date: 2 May 2002 State University of New York (Suny) Biotronics "Go go gadget: With a remote control sensor hotwired to its central nervous system, developments like the "roborat," created at SUNY's Downstate Medical Center, herald the coming of the biotronic age.
  • 37. Richard E. Smalley, Robert Curl and Harold Kroto won 1996 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the discovery of a structure of carbon atoms known as a “buckyball”. http://www.bnl.gov/bnlweb/pubaf/pr/PR_display.asp?prID=04-85 Nano
  • 38. http://www.nanotechproject.org
  • 39. http://www.bnl.gov/bnlweb/pubaf/pr/PR_display.asp?prID=04-85 A key attribute of the C-60 fullerene molecule is its numerous points of attachment, allowing for precise grafting of C-60 and DNA in three-dimensional (x, y, z) orientations. Nano-Bio
  • 40. Technical applications of biological molecules including protein-based materials, DNA-based materials, biomineralization, cellular systems and bioelectronics. http://www.nanobionics3.de/ NanoBionics
  • 41. • What forces are driving this pace of innovation? • How are Texas competitors and Texas organizing to create innovation, wealth and human capital?
  • 42. Texas Industry Cluster Initiative - Strategic Plan 1. Advanced Technologies and Manufacturing 2. Aerospace and Defense 3. Biotechnology and Life Sciences 4. Information and Computer Technology 5. Energy 6. Petroleum Refining and Chemical Products “This cluster initiative is important because for the first time in the history of this state, we will have a coordinated, market-driven economic development strategy that focuses on areas where we have the greatest growth potential and focuses on fostering that potential.” Governor Rick Perry
  • 43. Texas Industry Cluster Initiative Strategic Plan To launch this initiative, the Office of the Governor, Economic Development and Tourism division and the Texas Workforce Commission (TWC) are forming state and regional partnerships to foster growth and development in the six target clusters. This initiative also will lead the development of industry-based strategies for [job] recruitment [and workforce expansion within the state].
  • 44. Houston • Energy • Refining and Chemicals • BioTech • Advanced Manufacturing • Information Technology • Aerospace and Defense D / FW • Energy • BioTech • Advanced Manufacturing • Information Technology • Aerospace and Defense San Antonio • Energy • BioTech • Information Technology • Aerospace and Defense Corpus Christi • Energy • Refining and Chemicals Beaumont • Refining and Chemicals El Paso • Information Technology Midland • Energy Tyler • Advanced Manufacturing Rio Grande Valley • Advanced Manufacturing • Aerospace and Defense Lubbock • Biotechnology Austin • Biotechnology • Advanced Manufacturing • Information Technology Progress – Regional Forums – 700 Stakeholders
  • 45. RD&C Art NANO BIO INFO NEURO Calit2
  • 46. Finnish people have a high standard of education. All children receive compulsory basic education between the ages of 7 and 16. Education beyond the age of 16 is voluntary, taking the form of either a three to four-year course in upper secondary school or 2 to 5 years at a vocational school. Finnish higher education consists of two sectors: universities and polytechnics. There are 20 universities and 29 polytechnics in the country. Nearly 60 per cent of the population have completed post-primary education and 13 per cent have a university degree or comparable qualification. ORGANIZE for INNOVATION: In recent years there has been national focus on research and product development, with special emphasis on information technology.
  • 47. transitioning from a manufacturing to an innovation economy http://mit.edu/cre/research/ncc/proceedings/ncc-casestudies.pdf
  • 48. e-Korea Vision 2006 also set the following basic directions: · From Quantitative Expansion to Qualitative Accomplishments such as the increase in productivity through legal and institutional reforms and innovations in business processes throughout society…Social transformation not just technical. · From Creation of new industries led by the government to Foundation for new industries. The government’s new role is to focus on the enabling environment and the private sector will be developing new independent and creative industries… Bottom up and top down organization for innovation. · From Catch-up Strategy to Leading Strategy - To strengthen competitiveness in IT, the government will increase leading investments in core technologies and strategic services which have the potential to produce significant added value in the future. Innovation leader…. http://www.apdip.net/projects/2003/asian-forum/docs/papers/comparative.pdf
  • 49. Convergence Technopolei • Geographic “super clusters”. In US it’s MSA. Foreign programs are regional or national. • Organizing education and other institutions to cultivate innovation. • Networking urban-to-rural, industry-to-industry, industry to market and discipline-to-discipline across geography. • STEM plus ART/Design to create brands • Human and Intellectual Capital Strategy based on S&T convergence and living laboratories.
  • 50. Leadership in innovation is critical to Texas' success in the global economy. We must support the creation of new companies, new technologies, new products, new services, and new jobs.
  • 51. Business Climate, Workforce, Education & Outreach • Business Climate will do a scan based on what site selectors look for in recommending the state of Texas as a location to locate or expand business. • Workforce will focus on the identification of skill requirements of cluster industries. • Education will focus on supporting initiatives to increase rigor and relevance in STEM and to align the skill requirements of the cluster industries to help students meet education and career objectives. • Outreach will rally widespread public support, understanding and action to facilitate Texas becoming world class in one or more of the targeted clusters.
  • 52. http://www.twc.state.tx.us/news/ticluster.html
  • 53. Kaki Leyens in the Office of Employer Initiatives at the Texas Workforce Commission is the primary liaison to education. If you are interested in forming partnerships with industries to support your students, please leave a card, and I will pass them on to Kaki.
  • 54. • What forces are driving this pace of innovation? • How are Texas competitors and Texas organizing to create innovation, wealth and human capital?
  • 55. To learn more about workforce, education and millennial learning strategies, please attend Part 2 and hear from guest speaker Michael Bettersworth, TSTC.
  • 56. SuperComputing 95 Teraflop Challenge 1996, $100 million 2001, $1,000,000 2011, $1000 2021, $1 The Future of Computers 1996 Robert A. Freitas Jr., Research Scientist, Zyvex Corp.
  • 57. TRACTOR BEAMS FORCE FIELDS SUPERHERO SUIT PHASERS REPLICATORS IMMORTALITY INVISIBILITY TELEPORTATION THE HOLODECK The Future of Computers 1996 Robert A. Freitas Jr., Research Scientist, Zyvex Corp.
  • 58. Future Warrior Exhibits Super Powers By Phil Copeland American Forces Press Service WASHINGTON, July 27, 2004 "Warrior Physiological Status Monitoring System gives the soldier's body core temperature, skin temperature, heart rate, whether the soldier is standing or prone, and how much water the soldier has drunk…" DeGay said. The uniform from the waist down will have a robotic- powered system that is connected directly to the soldier. This system could use pistons to actually replicate the lower body, giving the soldier "upwards of about 300 percent greater lifting and load-carriage capability," DeGay said. "We are looking at potentially mounting a weapon directly to the uniform system and now the soldier becomes a walking gun platform."
  • 59. The Age of Science Non- Fiction?