Open access for researchers, research managers and libraries

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Presented at “Open Access: Maximising Research Impact” workshop, May 25 2009, …

Presented at “Open Access: Maximising Research Impact” workshop, May 25 2009,
Birzeit University Library, Palestine

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  • 1. Open access for researchers, research managers and libraries Iryna Kuchma, eIFL Open Access program manager, eIFL.net Presented at “ Open Access: Maximising Research Impact ” wor kshop, May 25 2009, Birzeit University Library, Palestine
  • 2. Why Open Access (OA)?
    • OA for researchers:
    • enlarged audience
    • citation impact
    • tenure
    • and promotion
  • 3. Why OA?
    • OA for policy makers
    • and research managers:
    • new tools
    • to manage
    • a university’s image and impact
  • 4. eIFL.net – 4 0 00 libraries in 46 countries
  • 5.  
  • 6. eIFL.net programs
    • 1. Open access
    • 2. Advocacy for access to knowledge:
    • copyright and libraries
    • 3. Promoting free and open source software
    • for libraries
  • 7. eIFL.net programs 2
    • 4. 1+1=More and better.
    • The benefits of library consortia
    • 5. Promoting a culture of cooperation: knowledge and information sharing
    • 6. Advocating for affordable and fair access to commercially produced scholarly resources
  • 8. CC BY-NC by mollyali : http :// www . flickr . com / photos / mollyali /2924209043/
  • 9. eIFL Open Access
    • OA
    • open repositories
    • OA journals
    • open educational sources
    • open data
    • OA policies
    • trainings and consultations
  • 10. eIFL Open Access
    • OA
    • Advocacy
    • Capacity building
  • 11. eIFL Open Access
    • seeks to enhance access to research
    • thereby accelerating innovation
    • and economic development in the countries
  • 12. OA for academics
  • 13. What do scientists want?
  • 14. What do scientists want? http :// wwmm . ch . cam . ac . uk / blogs / murrayrust /?p=1502
  • 15. Story #1 : arXiv.org
  • 16.  
  • 17. Open Access Impact
    • Open access brings more rapid and
    • more efficient progress for scholarly research
    • http:// arxiv .org/
    • “ Brody has looked at the pattern of citations
    • to articles deposited in arXiv, specifically
    • at the length of the delay between
    • when an article is deposited and when it is cited,
    • and has published the aggregated data
    • for each year from 1991.”
      • Brody, Tim; Harnad, Stevan; Carr, Leslie. Earlier web usage statistics as predictors of later citation impact. Journal of the American Association for Information Science and Technology (JASIST), 2005, Vol. 57 no. 8 pp. 1060-1072. http://eprints.ecs.soton.ac.uk/10713/01/timcorr.htm (accessed 30 October 2006)
      • Open Access: What is it and why should we have it? - ECS EPrints ...Open Access: What is it and why should we have it? Swan, A. (2006) Open Access: What is it and why should we have it? http:// eprints . ecs . soton .ac. uk /13028/
  • 18. Open Access Impact
    • “ As more papers are deposited and
    • more scientists use the repository,
    • the time between an article being deposited
    • and being cited has been shrinking dramatically,
    • year upon year.
    • Brody, Tim; Harnad, Stevan; Carr, Leslie. Earlier web usage statistics as predictors of later citation impact. Journal of the American Association for Information Science and Technology (JASIST), 2005, Vol. 57 no. 8 pp. 1060-1072. http://eprints.ecs.soton.ac.uk/10713/01/timcorr.htm (accessed 30 October 2006)
      • Open Access: What is it and why should we have it? - ECS EPrints ...Open Access: What is it and why should we have it? Swan, A. (2006) Open Access: What is it and why should we have it? http:// eprints . ecs . soton .ac. uk /13028/
  • 19.  
  • 20. Open Access Impact
    • “ This is important
    • for research uptake and progress,
    • because it means that in this area of research,
    • where articles are made available at –
    • or frequently before – publication,
    • the research cycle is accelerating .
    • Brody, Tim; Harnad, Stevan; Carr, Leslie. Earlier web usage statistics as predictors of later citation impact. Journal of the American Association for Information Science and Technology (JASIST), 2005, Vol. 57 no. 8 pp. 1060-1072. http://eprints.ecs.soton.ac.uk/10713/01/timcorr.htm (accessed 30 October 2006)
      • Open Access: What is it and why should we have it? - ECS EPrints ...Open Access: What is it and why should we have it? Swan, A. (2006) Open Access: What is it and why should we have it? http:// eprints . ecs . soton .ac. uk /13028/
  • 21. Open Access Impact
    • T he research cycle in high energy physics
    • is approaching maximum efficiency
    • as a result of the early and free availability
    • of articles that scientists in the field
    • can use and build upon rapidly.”
      • Brody, Tim; Harnad, Stevan; Carr, Leslie. Earlier web usage statistics as predictors of later citation impact. Journal of the American Association for Information Science and Technology (JASIST), 2005, Vol. 57 no. 8 pp. 1060-1072. http://eprints.ecs.soton.ac.uk/10713/01/timcorr.htm (accessed 30 October 2006)
      • Open Access: What is it and why should we have it? - ECS EPrints ...Open Access: What is it and why should we have it? Swan, A. (2006) Open Access: What is it and why should we have it? http:// eprints . ecs . soton .ac. uk /13028/
  • 22. Story #2 : research article by cogdogblog http :// www . flickr . com / photos / cogdog /1635259272/
  • 23. Scientific Publication Packages - Jane Hunter - Autumn 2006 “ Enhanced publications (what are they, why are they important)” by Dr.Leo Waaijers , http://www. eifl .net/cps/sections/services/ eifl - oa /training/2008- chisinau /12
  • 24. Scientific Publication Packages - Jane Hunter - Autumn 2006 “ Enhanced publications (what are they, why are they important)” by Dr.Leo Waaijers , http://www. eifl .net/cps/sections/services/ eifl - oa /training/2008- chisinau /12
  • 25.  
  • 26.  
  • 27.  
  • 28. OA
    • is the free online availability
    • of peer reviewed literature
    • permitting any user to read ,
    • download, copy, distribute,
    • print, search, or link
    • to the full texts of articles
  • 29. OA
    • “ It is important to stress here
    • that publishing is a fundamental part
    • of the process of doing science .
    • Moreover, as a scientist I am not writing for money —
    • like my wife, who was a professional writer at one time —
    • but I am writing for fame:
    • I want everyone to read what I write…
    • For that reason we volunteer our services,
    • and we don’t get paid.
    • That is what makes Open Access
    • a powerful concept for scientists. ”
    • The Basement Interviews Freeing the scientific literature Harold Varmus, Nobel laureate, former director of the US National Institutes of Health, and co-founder of open access publisher Public Library of Science, talks to Richard Poynder. Published on June 5th 2006 http:// poynder . blogspot .com/2006/06/interview-with- harold - varmus .html
  • 30. 2 complementary strategies: Gold by Vitó http :// www . flickr . com / photos / janeladeimagens /192943825/
  • 31. www. doaj .org
  • 32. www. doaj .org
  • 33. www. doaj .org
  • 34.  
  • 35. Hindawi Publishing Corporation
    • is a commercial publisher of STM literature.
    • On February 21, 2007
    • the Hindawi Publishing Corporation, Egypt,
    • converted the last of its subscription-based journals
    • to an open access model.
    • Hindawi currently employs more than 250 people,
    • and publishes more than 100 peer-reviewed journals.
  • 36. Hindawi Publishing Corporation
    • since its full conversion to Open Access
    • Hindawi's growth has continued to accelerate,
    • with monthly submission levels
    • growing by more than 100% during 2007
    • an increase of more than 40% per year
    • in the number of submitted manuscripts
    • annual impact factor growth more than 14%
  • 37.  
  • 38. First Monday (Thank you Edward J. Valauskas !)
    • Contributions to First Monday
    • have routinely been expanded
    • into book form
    • by their authors
    • after initial publication in First Monday
  • 39. Here are a few examples:
    • "The social life of documents"
    • by John Seely Brown and Paul Duguid
    • First Monday, volume 1, number 1 (May 1996)
    • was expanded into the book entitled
    • The social life of information
    • Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 2000.
    • (reprinted by Harvard Business School Press in 2002 and 2006; Dutch translation "De waarde van informatie" published in 2000; Chinese translation "Zi xun ge ming le shen me?" in 2001; Korean translation "Bit`u eso ingan uro" in 2001; Portuguese translation "A vida social da informação" in 2001; Spanish translation "La vida social de la información" in 2001; Turkish translation "Enformasyonun sosyal yasami" in 2001; Japanese translation "Naze aiti wa shakai o kaenainoka" in 2002).
  • 40. Here are a few examples:
    • "Digital diploma mills:
    • The automation of higher education"
    • by David F. Noble
    • First Monday, volume 3, number 1 (January 1998)
    • was expanded into the book entitled
    • Digital diploma mills: The automation of higher education
    • New York: Monthly Review Press, 2001.
    • (reprinted 2002 with new afterward by the author)
  • 41. Here are a few examples:
    • "The cathedral and the bazaar"
    • by Eric S. Raymond
    • First Monday, volume 3, number 3 (March 1998)
    • was expanded into the book entitled
    • The cathedral and the bazaar
    • Cambridge, Mass.: O'Reilly, 1999.
    • (Revised edition 2001)
  • 42. First Monday
    • has cooperated with MIT Press
    • in publishing excerpts
    • from new
    • books
    • in the virtual pages of the journal
  • 43. Here are a few examples:
    • - Information ecologies: Using technology with heart by Bonnie A Nardi and Vicki O'Day
    • Cambridge, Mass. : MIT Press, 1999.
    • excerpts in First Monday, volume 4, number 5 (May 1999)
    • -  Change of state: Information, policy and power by Sandra Braman
    • Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 2006.
    • excerpts in First Monday, volume 12, number 4 (April 2007)
    •   - Acting with technology: Activity theory and interaction design by Victor Kaptelinin and Bonnie Nardi
    • Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 2006.
    • excerpts in First Monday, volume 12, number 4 (April 2007)
  • 44. First Monday
    • Content from First Monday
    • has re-appeared in a variety of newspapers,
    • magazines, and journals around the world :
    • Business Week,
    • Los Angeles Times,
    • New York Times,
    • Scientific American,
    • Washington Post,
    • and Wired, among others
  • 45.  
  • 46.  
  • 47.  
  • 48. https :// wiki . library . jhu . edu / display / epubs / Home ? showChildren = false
  • 49. 2 complementary strategies - Green by Jim Frazier http :// www . flickr . com / photos / jimfrazier /140042827/
  • 50. http :// www . opendoar . org /
  • 51.  
  • 52. Open repositories
    • A digital repository is defined as
    • containing research output,
    • institutional or thematic
    • and OAI compliant ( http://www. openarchives .org/OAI/ openarchivesprotocol .html )
      • (From The European Repository Landscape Inventory Study into the Present Type and Level of OAI-Compliant Digital Repository Activities in the EU by Maurits van der Graaf and Kwame van Eijndhoven)
  • 53. Content
    • Peer-reviewed articles
    • Conference presentations
    • Books
    • Course packs
    • Annotated images
    • Audio and video clips
    • Research data
  • 54. Content
    • Gray literature :
    • Preprints / working materials /
    • theses and dissertations / reports /
    • conference materials / bulletins /
    • grant applications / reports to the donors / memorandums / statistical reports /
    • technical documentation / questionnaires…
  • 55. http :// oad . simmons . edu / oadwiki / Disciplinary _ repositories
  • 56. http ://search3. driver .research- infrastructures . eu / webInterface / simpleSearch . do ; jsessionid =30E69E7F5FDBD7BB9CB5AC829852074B? action = load
  • 57. OA for students
    • Moving from print to electronic
    • – usage growth 145%
    • The most popular theses and dissertations
    • were downloaded 37,501 times (history )
    • and 33,752 times (engineering);
    • history one was published and was a long seller
    • (John Hagen, West Virginia University )
  • 58. OA for students
    • 69% of students
    • from the creative writing department
    • had more successful careers
    • if they went OA with their dissertations –
    • a good marketing tool for them
    • (John Hagen, West Virginia University )
  • 59. Open Access Impact
    • increased citation rates :
    • For 72% of papers
    • published in the Astrophysical Journal,
    • free versions of the paper are available
    • (mainly through ArXiv).
    • These 72% of papers are, on average,
    • cited more than twice as often
    • as the remaining 28%
    • that do not have free versions.
    • Schwarz, G. and Kennicutt Jr., R. C. (2004): Demographic and Citation Trends in Astrophysical Journal Papers and Preprints (pdf 14pp), arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0411275, 10 November 2004, Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society, Vol. 36, 1654-1663
  • 60. Open Access Impact
    • Open access PNAS papers
    • have 50% more full-text downloads
    • than non-open access papers
      • http://www.library. yale . edu /~ llicense / ListArchives /0505/msg01580.html
    • … and are on average
    • twice as likely to be cited
      • http://biology. plosjournals .org/ perlserv /?request=get-document& doi =10.1371/journal. pbio .0040157
  • 61. http :// opcit . eprints . org /oacitation- biblio . html
  • 62. http :// repinf . pbworks . com
  • 63. http :// repinf . pbworks . com /Citation- services
  • 64.  
  • 65. http :// repinf . pbworks . com /Usage-reporting-and- metrics
  • 66.  
  • 67. Leverage by L es C arr : http :// www . slideshare . net / lescarr / leverage ? type = powerpoint The Repository has made a splash page, with previews and usage stats ( Example from EPrints at University of Southampton)
  • 68. Leverage by L es C arr : http :// www . slideshare . net / lescarr / leverage ? type = powerpoint The repository has made a bibliography for you …( Example from DSpace at Universiteit Hasselt, Belgium)
  • 69. Leverage by L es C arr : http :// www . slideshare . net / lescarr / leverage ? type = powerpoint …maybe personalised it with other information about you… ( Example from DSpace at University of Chicago, Illinois)
  • 70. Leverage by L es C arr : http :// www . slideshare . net / lescarr / leverage ? type = powerpoint …set up a mailing list for you… Example from Digital Commons at Cal Poly
  • 71. Leverage by L es C arr : http :// www . slideshare . net / lescarr / leverage ? type = powerpoint Automatically updated your research group web pages (Example from IAM web site at University of Southampton, UK)
  • 72. Leverage by L es C arr : http :// www . slideshare . net / lescarr / leverage ? type = powerpoint Less Administration: Management will use the information for the admin forms you would otherwise have to complete
  • 73. Leverage by L es C arr : http :// www . slideshare . net / lescarr / leverage ? type = powerpoint Update your Teaching Pages
  • 74. OA for research managers
  • 75. Why open repositories?
    • Opening up the outputs
    • of the institution to the world
    • Maximizing the visibility and impact
    • of these outputs
    • Showcasing the quality of the research
    • in the institution
  • 76. Why open repositories?
    • Collecting and curating
    • the digital outputs of the institution
    • Managing and measuring
    • research and teaching activities
    • Providing a workspace for work-in-progress
    • and for collaborative and large-scale projects
  • 77. Why open repositories?
    • Enabling and encouraging
    • interdisciplinary approaches to research
    • Facilitating the development and sharing
    • of digital teaching materials and aids
    • Supporting student endeavours ,
    • providing access to theses and dissertations
    • and a location for the development of e-portfolios
  • 78. Why open repositories?
    • Institutional and national level
    • research assessment and research management , bringing together research expertise
    • across the institution and country
    • Information rich collaboration ,
    • effective decision-making
    • and successful research activity
    • Improved governmental policy
    • and public health care outcomes
  • 79.  
  • 80.  
  • 81.  
  • 82.  
  • 83. The Power of Open Access
    • There are considerable
    • economic, social and educational benefits
    • to making research and other outputs available without financial, legal and technical
    • barriers to access
  • 84.  
  • 85. http://www. jisc .ac. uk /publications/publications/ economicpublishingmodelsfinalreport . aspx
    • “… open access publishing
    • for journal articles
    • might bring system savings
    • of around £215 million per annum
    • nationally in the UK
    • (at 2007 prices and levels of publishing activity), of which around £165 million
    • would accrue in higher education.
  • 86. http://www. jisc .ac. uk /publications/publications/ economicpublishingmodelsfinalreport . aspx
    • “… a repositories and overlay services model may well produce greater cost savings
    • than open access publishing –
    • with our estimates suggesting system
    • savings of perhaps £260 million nationally,
    • of which around £205 might accrue in higher education.”
    • And the increase in returns to R&D resulting from enhanced access may be substantial.”
  • 87.  
  • 88. OA mandates
  • 89. OA & libraries
  • 90. http :// www . arl . org / bm ~ doc /transformational- times . pdf
  • 91. Common Themes
    • “ Libraries need to change their practices
    • for managing traditional content
    • and develop new capabilities
    • for dealing with digital materials of all types,
    • but especially new forms of scholarship, teaching and learning resources,
    • special collections
    • (particularly hidden collections),
    • and research data.”
  • 92. Common Themes
    • “ Content industries
    • inevitably seek to extend control over the copyright regime and over content, in general, while libraries, authors, and research institutions endeavor to provide more access to and active management
    • of the intellectual assets produced by the academy.”
  • 93. Common Themes
    • “ Radical reconfiguration of research library organizations and services is needed
    • coupled with an increasingly diverse and talented staff
    • to provide needed leadership
    • and technical skills
    • to respond to the rapidly changing environment.”
  • 94. Common Themes
    • “ New relationships
    • must be formed with library users
    • to support rapid shifts
    • in research and teaching practices.”
  • 95. Trends in Scholarly Communication
    • Transformations in scholarly communication practices are driving development and re-engineering
    • of library services:
    • • Libraries are moving into new service areas
    • like publishing support and repository services.
    • Repository services are moving beyond pre-print and post-print dissemination to include a wide range of content types, clients, and service needs.
  • 96. Trends in Scholarly Communication
    • Library services increasingly are developed
    • in collaboration with other units on campus
    • and with partners at other institutions.
    • Libraries will be developing new partnerships and strategies for cooperatively collecting new materials and managing existing collections.
  • 97. Trends in Scholarly Communication
    • “ the economic situation
    • could be favourable
    • to the further development
    • of open access publishing …”
  • 98. Trends in Scholarly Communication
    • “ Open Access publication mandates
    • may well be adopted by the funding councils…
    • Data preservation will also likely be more widely mandated .
    • Systematic enforcement of the mandates
    • will depend on the development
    • of appropriate repositories,
    • whether disciplinary or institutional .”
  • 99. OA & libraries
    • OA
    • has permanently changed
    • the field of scholarly communication
  • 100. OA & libraries
    • OA has changed
    • the profile of academic and research libraries
    • – more and more they have become partners
    • in research, data-curation and education,
    • ensuring the quality of digital resources
    • is maintained, and openly sharing these resources with their users
  • 101. OA & libraries
    • OA has changed
    • the profile of academic and research libraries
    • – more and more they have become partners
    • in research, data-curation and education,
    • ensuring the quality of digital resources
    • is maintained, and openly sharing these resources with their users
  • 102. OA & libraries
    • Academic and research libraries
    • are also developing
    • advanced and enhanced metrics
    • – a new range of standardized indicators based on reader (rather than author-facing) metrics
    • and much more still remains to be explored
  • 103. Map of science
  • 104. Changing landscape
    • In this changing environment
    • for scholarly communication
    • academic and research libraries
    • need to be
    • agile,
    • creative,
    • risk-taking
    • and innovative
    • in order to respond to the needs
    • of a new generation of faculty and students
  • 105. Changing landscape
    • Science is dynamic
    • and collaborative
    • and it is important
    • to sustain the communication processes,
    • rather than to simply archive research results
    • in the form of a single journal article
  • 106. Changing landscape
    • Librarians and information specialists
    • need to be involved in the early planning
    • and data-modelling phases
    • of research
    • in order to accelerate learning
    • and discovery,
    • and libraries will need
    • to become core collaborators on campus,
    • using technology
    • to advance scholarly communication
    • and enable a climate of openness
  • 107. http :// www . arl . org / bm ~ doc /repository-services- report . pdf
  • 108.  
  • 109. Next steps – researchers and students
    • Publish articles in OA journals
    • Self-archive in open repositories
    • Spread a word about OA
  • 110. Next steps – researcher managers
    • Introduce OA polices
    • Transform the journals into OA journals
    • Set-up open repositories
    • Spread a word about OA
  • 111. Next steps – libraries
    • Set-up open repositories
    • Help researchers and students to self-archive
    • Help to publish OA journals and create open educational resources
  • 112. Next steps – libraries 2
    • Help in data curation and sharing
    • Spread a word about OA
  • 113.  
  • 114. Thank you ! Questions ? Iryna Kuchma iryna.kuchma[at]eifl.net; www. eifl .net The presentation is licensed with Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License