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Soccer Fitness: A Science Based Approach
 

Soccer Fitness: A Science Based Approach

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This is a presentation by Mike Young, PhD. Dr. Young is the fitness coach for the Vancouver Whitecaps (MLS) and founder of HPC-Athletic Lab sport performance training and research center. The ...

This is a presentation by Mike Young, PhD. Dr. Young is the fitness coach for the Vancouver Whitecaps (MLS) and founder of HPC-Athletic Lab sport performance training and research center. The presentation details the physical demands of the sport of soccer and how to best train for them while managing fatigue.

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Soccer Fitness: A Science Based Approach Soccer Fitness: A Science Based Approach Presentation Transcript

  • SOCCER FITNESS A SCIENCE BASED APPROACH Mike Young, PhD Athletic Lab - Cary, NCVancouver Whitecaps - Vancouver, BC
  • Opening Thoughts sume n othing As Question every thing “C ommon” sense? Science is fu ndamental
  • GA ME REQ UIR EM EN TS
  • FIT NE SS TR AIN IN G
  • I NG PLANNYEARLY
  • RE DU CI NG IN JU RY
  • AT HL ET EM O NI TO RI NG
  • FATIG UE MA NAG EMEN T
  • GAME REQUIREMENTS
  • REQUIREMENTS OF THE GAME Technical
  • REQUIREMENTS OF THE GAME Technical Tactical
  • REQUIREMENTS OF THE GAME Technical Psychological Tactical
  • REQUIREMENTS OF THE GAME Technical Physical Psychological Tactical
  • REQUIREMENTS OF THE GAME Technical Physical Psychological Tactical
  • • Players cover average of 10-12km in a game (~6 miles)• Game is 80-90 minutes of continuous activity• 10-12km / 80-90 min = average pace of ~7km / hr (roughly 13’ mile pace)
  • “Logical” conclusion.... run, run, run (slow & steady)• Players cover average of 10-12km in a game (~6 miles)• Game is 80-90 minutes of continuous activity• 10-12km / 80-90 min = average pace of ~7km / hr (roughly 13’ mile pace)
  • BU T. ...
  • Flaw of Averages
  • A’AM TS ,M HE FACJU STT
  • FITNESS DEMANDS ANALYSIS SOCCER P OF MOTOR ACTIV LA ITIE YERS S OF MARCIN A PROFESS 1 NDRZEJ E WSKI, 1,2 IONAL Faculty of Methodolo JAN CHM URA, 3 B 2 KKS Lech gy and Re EATA P Poznan S.A creation, U LUTA, 1 Motor Acti ´ , Football C niversity S AND A NDRZEJ vity, Univ lub, Pozna chool of Ph KASPRZAK 2 ersity Scho n´, Poznan ysical Edu ol of Physi ´, Poland; cation, Poz cal Educati and 3Facu nan, Polan on, Wrocła lty of Play d; w, Poland ers’ ABSTRACT Andrzejew ski, M, Ch of motor mura, J, P activities luta, B, an tactical, a of profess d Kasprza nd menta Cond Re ional socc k, A. Analy Recently, l prepara s 26(6): er players sis much atte tion from study was 1481–14 . J Streng players p ntion has the playe to determ 88, 2012 th been paid rs (23). ine the dis —The obje ossessing to the sele soccer pla tance cov ctive of th profiles, th proper an ction of yers durin ered by p is us provid thropome ized matc g matche rofessiona workouts ing for th tric and h analysis s with the l that allow e possibil efficiency system Am use of the players to ity of sys France). K isco Pro Ò computer- mance. Th tematic inematic e (version 1 e preparati achieve o distance c xamination .0.2, Nice the impro on of a pla ptimum p overed by included th , vement of yer is freq erfor- 31 players e specific of develop technical uently focUnion of participati ation of th ing motor or tactical used on European ng in 4 ma e abilities (2 skills at thduring the Football tches in th team sport ,3,17,22,27 e expense 200 Associatio e s, soccer a ). Lik n ls
  • •Aerobic capacity•Average intensit is EXTREME LY impor tan y approache t•Mid-Fielder s r un s lactate thre sh the most old ANALYSIS SOCCER P OF MOTOR ACTIV LA ITIE YERS S OF MARCIN A PROFESS 1 NDRZEJ E WSKI, 1,2 IONAL Faculty of Methodolo JAN CHM URA, 3 B 2 KKS Lech gy and Re EATA P Poznan S.A creation, U LUTA, 1 Motor Acti ´ , Football C niversity S AND A NDRZEJ vity, Univ lub, Pozna chool of Ph KASPRZAK 2 ersity Scho n´, Poznan ysical Edu ol of Physi ´, Poland; cation, Poz cal Educati and 3Facu nan, Polan on, Wrocła lty of Play d; w, Poland ers’ ABSTRACT Andrzejew ski, M, Ch of motor mura, J, P activities luta, B, an tactical, a of profess d Kasprza nd menta Cond Re ional socc k, A. Analy Recently, l prepara s 26(6): er players sis much atte tion from study was 1481–14 . J Streng players p ntion has the playe to determ 88, 2012 th been paid rs (23). ine the dis —The obje ossessing to the sele soccer pla tance cov ctive of th profiles, th proper an ction of yers durin ered by p is us provid thropome ized matc g matche rofessiona workouts ing for th tric and h analysis s with the l that allow e possibil efficiency system Am use of the players to ity of sys France). K isco Pro Ò computer- mance. Th tematic inematic e (version 1 e preparati achieve o distance c xamination .0.2, Nice the impro on of a pla ptimum p overed by included th , vement of yer is freq erfor- 31 players e specific of develop technical uently focUnion of participati ation of th ing motor or tactical used on European ng in 4 ma e abilities (2 skills at thduring the Football tches in th team sport ,3,17,22,27 e expense 200 Associatio e s, soccer a ). Lik n ls
  • FITNESS DEMANDS CCER OM EN SO F E LITE W E LEVE LS IES O ANC CTIVIT RFORM 1 AMATCH AT DIFFERENT PE 3 ND JENS B L, A ANGSB O KENDA LD KIR ark; ERS ONA gen, Denm Physical 2 ON, D f CopenhaPLAY 1 HELENA ANDERSS gy, Unive RUSTR UP, rsity o nce, Divis ion of uman Phy siolo Movemen t Scie TER K 1 tment of H 3 Center for Human R, P E epar MAGN I MOH Sciences, D eden; xercise and Sport ¨rebro University, Sw na 1 stitute of E rth Caroli In Sciences, O a, Chapel Hill, No 2 epartment of Health arolin D f North C yers have apy, U niversity o CTION soccer pla Ther I NTRODU f elite ,12,14– aspects o n (1,2,10 he physical ly in me the xtensive regarding T r- been studied e n exists , match pe informati o yers (5,6,7 A BSTR ACT ical dem ands and nd 15 18,22,2 5). Less omen soccer pla ower the phys p-class a ands in w aerobic p to study ineteen to ysical dem maximum ral We soug ht r players. N ompetitive ph ns (8) and ed in seve en socce ped in c dimensio n determin e activity of wom y videota ers 11,19,24). Body players ha ve bee formance individuall . The play ve examin ed th ers were performed of women tudies ha cus high-level play lysis were espond- (6,8,1 1,23) me s e main fo otion ana game corr dition, so owever, th be and time-m 0 times in a top- studies. In ad (2,24). H lieved to matches, ity .1,30 total. The atch play hich is be
  • s er peer s n s than les tensity r u f a game o re high in he end o er s perform m wards t attacker s -class play s temporarily & to an mid-fielder s &•Top develop h e•Fatigu der s have lower wo r k rates t •Defen CCER OM EN SO F E LITE W E LEVE LS IES O ANC CTIVIT RFORM 1 A MATCH AT DIFFERENT PE 3 ND JENS B L, A ANGSB O KENDA LD KIR ark; ERS ONA gen, Denm Physical 2 ON, D f Copenha PLAY 1 HELENA ANDERSS gy, Unive RUSTR UP, rsity o nce, Divis ion of uman Phy siolo Movemen t Scie TER K 1 tment of H 3 Center for Human R, P E epar MAGN I MOH Sciences, D eden; xercise and Sport ¨rebro University, Sw na 1 stitute of E rth Caroli In Sciences, O a, Chapel Hill, No 2 epartment of Health arolin D f North C yers have apy, U niversity o CTION soccer pla Ther I NTRODU f elite ,12,14– aspects o n (1,2,10 he physical ly in me the xtensive regarding T r- been studied e n exists , match pe informati o yers (5,6,7 A BSTR ACT ical dem ands and nd 15 18,22,2 5). Less omen soccer pla ower the phys p-class a ands in w aerobic p to study ineteen to ysical dem maximum ral We soug ht r players. N ompetitive ph ns (8) and ed in seve en socce ped in c dimensio n determin e activity of wom y videota ers 11,19,24). Body players ha ve bee formance individuall . The play ve examin ed th ers were performed of women tudies ha cus high-level play lysis were espond- (6,8,1 1,23) me s e main fo otion ana game corr dition, so owever, th be and time-m 0 times in a top- studies. In ad (2,24). H lieved to matches, ity .1,30 total. The atch play hich is be
  • FITNESS DEMANDS
  • in om inant powerful action•Straight sprints are the most d rdecisive offensive s ituations in elite socce en ts ending in goals are•Most de cisive powerful movemmade without the ball
  • POSITIONAL DEMANDS ©Journal of http://www Sports Science and .jssm.org Medicine (2007) 6 , 63-70 Research article Physical d emands o f differen Jonathan t positi on 1 Bloomfield 1 s in FA Premier L Sports Ins , Remco P eague soc titute of N olman a Exercise S cie orthern Ir ela 2 nd Peter cer tute Cardif nce, The Universit nd, University of ODonogh 3 ue f, Cardiff, y of Hull, U UK East Ridin lster, Northern Irela g of York shire, UK 3 nd, UK, 2 Departm , School e Abstract of Sport, U nt of Sport, Healt niversity o h& The purpo f Wales In se sti- of English of this study was to age, statu Football A evaluate th re, body m three diffe ss e recently id as and strike rent posit ociation (FA) Prem physical demands ional clas ier Leagu entified be s and body mass in r). sifications e tions sugg tween elite dex have Bloomfield Computerised time (defender, soccer of es p may be su ting that players of layers of different p n bee Movemen -motion v midfielder it pa os positions able for the deman rticular size and sh i- purposefu ide l moveme t Classification w o-analysis using th nt (PM) p as undert e (B ds ap tional role loomfield et al., 20 of the various pla e tion of PM erformed a ment ( = had a goo d inter-tes by 55 pla ken on the appears to 05). In th ying ter reliabil yers. is 0 performin .7277). Players sp ity strength Recogni- expenditu re in a m have an influence respect, posi- g PM. Po ent 40.6 ± of agree- atch, sug otime spen sit 1 t sprinting ion had a significa 0.0% of the match physiolog ical and b gesting d n total energystill (p < , running, nt influen enced by ioenergeti ifferent p 0.0 shu ce o play c requ hysical,
  • •Player s spent 48.7 directly forwa ± 9.2% of pu rd rposeful mov ement going •726 ± 203 turns •Upwards of 40% in a game or slowly jogg of purposeful ing movement is spent walking ©Journal of http://www Sports Science and .jssm.org Medicine (2007) 6 , 63-70 Research article Physical d emands o f differen Jonathan t positi on 1 Bloomfield 1 s in FA Premier L Sports Ins , Remco P eague soc titute of N olman a Exercise S cie orthern Ir ela 2 nd Peter cer tute Cardif nce, The Universit nd, University of ODonogh 3 ue f, Cardiff, y of Hull, U UK East Ridin lster, Northern Irela g of York shire, UK 3 nd, UK, 2 Departm , School e Abstract of Sport, U nt of Sport, Healt niversity o h& The purpo f Wales In se sti- of English of this study was to age, statu Football A evaluate th re, body m three diffe ss e recently id as and strike rent posit ociation (FA) Prem physical demands ional clas ier Leagu entified be s and body mass in r). sifications e tions sugg tween elite dex have Bloomfield Computerised time (defender, soccer of es p may be su ting that players of layers of different p n bee Movemen -motion v midfielder it pa os positions able for the deman rticular size and sh i- purposefu ide l moveme t Classification w o-analysis using th nt (PM) p as undert e (B ds ap tional role loomfield et al., 20 of the various pla e tion of PM erformed a ment ( = had a goo d inter-tes by 55 pla ken on the appears to 05). In th ying ter reliabil yers. is 0 performin .7277). Players sp ity strength Recogni- expenditu re in a m have an influence respect, posi- g PM. Po ent 40.6 ± of agree- atch, sug otime spen sit 1 t sprinting ion had a significa 0.0% of the match physiolog ical and b gesting d n total energystill (p < , running, nt influen enced by ioenergeti ifferent p 0.0 shu ce o play c requ hysical,
  • ATTACKER MLS FAPL nPC Dist. Covered 10737 10715 11073 H.I. Dist Covered 1168 1090 1221 Season 2011 H.I. Dist Covered WP 705 672 751 PHYSICAL H.I. Dist Covered WOP 385 349 388 COMPARISON H.I. Dist Covered BOP No. H.I. Activities 70 154 68 149 94 164 Sprint Dist. 375 325 383 HSR Dist 793 764 838 No. of Sprints 56 50 57 Recovery Time 39 40 36LEFT MIDFIELD MLS FAPL nPC CENTRE MIDFIELD MLS FAPL nPC RIGHT MIDFIELD MLS FAPL nPCDist. Covered 11469 11361 11753 Dist. Covered 11631 11544 11850 Dist. Covered 11455 11514 11734H.I. Dist Covered 1212 1305 1440 H.I. Dist Covered 1038 1114 1225 H.I. Dist Covered 1291 1352 1478H.I. Dist Covered WP 653 701 741 H.I. Dist Covered WP 395 432 492 H.I. Dist Covered WP 673 715 771H.I. Dist Covered WOP 473 529 584 H.I. Dist Covered WOP 581 626 650 H.I. Dist Covered WOP 538 556 591H.I. Dist Covered BOP 76 74 114 H.I. Dist Covered BOP 55 56 80 H.I. Dist Covered BOP 76 79 114No. H.I. Activities 168 178 193 No. H.I. Activities 166 169 184 No. H.I. Activities 173 183 195Sprint Dist. 353 387 442 Sprint Dist. 255 287 320 Sprint Dist. 402 408 466HSR Dist 859 918 998 HSR Dist 783 827 905 HSR Dist 888 944 1011No. of Sprints 55 60 66 No. of Sprints 44 48 53 No. of Sprints 58 62 69Recovery Time 35 33 30 Recovery Time 36 35 32 Recovery Time 34 32 30LEFT BACK MLS FAPL nPC CENTRE BACK MLS FAPL nPC RIGHT BACK MLS FAPL nPCDist. Covered 10996 10741 11100 Dist. Covered 10299 10017 10420 Dist. Covered 11104 10690 11170H.I. Dist Covered 1130 1114 1180 H.I. Dist Covered 784 715 823 H.I. Dist Covered 1122 1063 1283H.I. Dist Covered WP 438 440 430 H.I. Dist Covered WP 165 144 165 H.I. Dist Covered WP 409 402 517H.I. Dist Covered WOP 609 595 640 H.I. Dist Covered WOP 546 499 566 H.I. Dist Covered WOP 627 587 660H.I. Dist Covered BOP 82 79 107 H.I. Dist Covered BOP 71 72 91 H.I. Dist Covered BOP 77 73 104No. H.I. Activities 157 151 165 No. H.I. Activities 119 107 125 No. H.I. Activities 155 146 170Sprint Dist. 331 341 356 Sprint Dist. 212 195 221 Sprint Dist. 339 315 407HSR Dist 798 773 825 HSR Dist 571 520 602 HSR Dist 783 748 876No. of Sprints 51 52 55 No. of Sprints 34 31 36 No. of Sprints 52 48 60Recovery Time* 38 39 35 Recovery Time 50 56 48 Recovery Time 37 40 35 GOALKEEPER MLS FAPL nPC Dist. Covered 5145 5168 5628 H.I. Dist Covered 69 69 84 No. H.I. Activities 14 14 17 Sprint Dist. 15 14 20 HSR Dist 54 55 64 Run Dist. 189 196 235 Jog Dist. 1125 1128 1343 Walk Dist. 3676 3684 3885 No. of Sprints 3 3 4
  • Conclusions... Different positions may require different levels & types of fitnessAerobic demand of the sport is highAnaerobic lactate component is less than what many believe
  • Conclusions... Linear sprinting is a HUGE determinant of goal scoringSpeed without the ball may be a bigger determinant of scoring ability than speed with the ball
  • Conclusions... The game is primarily characterized as short bursts of high intensity straight ahead acceleration punctuated byintermittent rest periods of very low & moderate activity
  • Conclusions... Due to the intermittent highintensity efforts with insufficient recovery, the sport can best be classified as an alactic-aerobic sport
  • plicati on?Ap
  • POINTS OF TRAINING EMPHASISConsiderable emphasis should be given to developing: Aerobic capacity Alactic Anaerobic abilities (especially linear speed)Limited (but beneficial) training should be done toenhance anaerobic lactate capacity
  • Aerobic Capacity
  • Aerobic Capacity Aerobic capa city fuels the ability to per form repeate high intensity d efforts when the rest inter val between efforts is insu fficient for complete rec overy
  • ANAEROBIC ALACTIC ABILITIES• Speed (especially linear)• Power• Strength
  • Quickness & Agility?
  • A distinct but related motor pattern to speed, power & strengthQuickness & Agility?
  • ANAEROBIC LACTIC CAPACITY VIE W BRIEF RE 09, 4, 291-306 rformance, 20 and Pe rts Ph ysiology al of Spo n al Journ .Internatio etics, Inc man Kin ootball Hu © 2009 ty Train ing in F High -Intensi ens Ban gsb o ini , an dJ a nno Rampin c high- arce llo Iaia, Erm e effects of aerobi emen- F. M d pe rformanc t on impl ogical an es insigh l mea- ajo r physiol ll, and provid siologica ws the m n footba and phy is ar ticle revie ance training i ng. Analysis emanding , and Th ed-endur cal traini tically d .
  • threshold lay an of lactate city may p the fringe lactic capa perate on anaerobic• Player s o n ot critical• Although ppor t role imp or tant su ing efficiency • Grea t for train VIE W BRIEF RE 09, 4, 291-306 rformance, 20 and Pe rts Ph ysiology al of Spo n al Journ . Internatio etics, Inc man Kin ootball Hu © 2009 ty Train ing in F High -Intensi ens Ban gsb o ini , an dJ a nno Rampin c high- arce llo Iaia, Erm e effects of aerobi emen- F. M d pe rformanc t on impl ogical an es insigh l mea- ajo r physiol ll, and provid siologica ws the m n footba and phy is ar ticle revie ance training i ng. Analysis emanding , and Th ed-endur cal traini tically d .
  • FITNESS TRAINING
  • AEROBIC FITNESS• Intensity must be sufficiently low that you are training aerobic pathways and not glycolytic• Durations must be sufficiently long that you are providing an adequate stimulus• For non-continuous efforts, rest intervals must be appropriate to achieve the desired outcome...too long or too short and you won’t provide the desired stimulus
  • Aerobic Training Guidelines Continuous Method: Inter val Method: Duration: 15-60 min Duration: 3-8 min / inter val Intensity: 70-85% of max HR Reps: 3-5 Intensity: 85-95% of max HR Work:Rest Ratio: 1:0.5-3Should be addressed in some manner 3-4x / week
  • Aerobic Training GuidelinesThe combination of games and standardduration technical / tactical practicesmay provide sufficient aerobic stimulusAdditional work is appropriate formaintenance, remediation and duringcritical training windows of the year (off-season, long stretches w/o games, etc)
  • ANAEROBIC LACTIC CAPACITY
  • Anaerobic Glycolytic Training GuidelinesWill primarily be addressed through small sided games and / or HIIT Methods Interval Method: Repetition Method: Duration: 15 - 60 sec Duration: 40 sec - 12 min Intensity: 100-120% of Intensity: 95-105% V02max V02max Work:Rest ratio: 1:1-2 Work:Rest ratio: 1:3-5
  • SPEED!
  • SPEED TRAINING GUIDELINES• Emphasize appropriate mechanics and maximal intensity• Work : rest ratios = 1 : 20 - 40• Rep lengths of 10-40m (~ 1 - 5 sec)• Total volume should be constrained (160m - 300m)
  • SPEED TRAINING GUIDELINES Adding changes of direction, start-stops,turns, lateral movement, change of tempo,jumps, headers, etc are all appropriate but should not take away from the focal point of developing linear speed
  • Repeat Sprint Ability To be fit for soccer you must be able to sprint fast. Repeatedly. With minimal rest.
  • LIMITERS OF RSA•Fatigue from repeat efforts is inversely correlated to initial sprintperformance•Limitations in energy supply, which include energy available fromphosphocreatine hydrolysis, anaerobic glycolysis and oxidativemetabolism, and the intramuscular accumulation of metabolic by-products, such as hydrogen ions are key factors in performancedecrement•Neural factors (magnitude and strategy of recruitment) arerelated to fatigue•Stiffness regulation, hypoglycemia, muscle damage andenvironmental conditions may also compromise repeat sprint ability (Bishop et al, 2011)
  • TRAINING RSA1. Include traditional sprint training to improve an athlete’s capacity in a single sprint effort2. Some high intensity interval training is beneficial to improve the athlete’s ability to recover between sprint efforts. (Bishop et al, 2011)
  • RSA Training GuidelinesRSA is addressed indirectly through other trainingmethods but specific training is also recommended Intensity: 95-100% Reps: 10-30m Volume: <300m total Work:Rest Ratio: 1:5-10 Frequency: 1-2x / week
  • AGILITY & QUICKNESS?
  • Small Sided Games! Can be a sport-specific means of addressing aerobic, anaerobic, and / or anaerobic alactic abilities whilesimultaneously working on technical & technical skills Stimulus will depend on the following variables: Rest inter val bet ween games Players involved Field size & dimensions Duration of games Restrictions
  • STRENGTH & POWER
  • “Do I really need to lift?”
  • “Do I really need to lift?” “...there is sufficient evidence for strength training programs to continue to be an integral part of athletic preparation in team sports.”
  • Benefits of Strength Training Enhances acceleration Reduces likelihood for injury Enhances power (jumping, change of direction, etc) Improves running economy
  • Maximal strength is most efficiently developed using external loads that challengethe neuromuscular system
  • TRAINING HOLISTICALLY• Muscles don’t act in isolation• Train movements not muscles• Address asymmetries and imbalances
  • BASIC GUIDELINES• Multi-joint exercises through complete ranges of motion• Forstrength & power, lower rep ranges, higher loads, and moderate volumes are suggested• Forhypertrophy, moderate reps and load with higher volume is suggested
  • EXERCISE SELECTION: STRENGTH
  • POWER DEVELOPMENTExercise Absolute Power (Watts) 100kg Male 75kg FemaleBench Press 300Back Squat 1100Deadlift 1100Snatch 3000 1750Snatch 2nd Pull 5500 2900Clean 2950 1750Clean 2nd Pull 5500 2650Jerk 5400 2600 *Total pull: Lift-off until maximal vertical velocity **2nd pull: Transition until maximal vertical barbell velocity
  • POWER DEVELOPMENTExercise Absolute Power (Watts) 100kg Male 75kg Female Even ifBench Press 300 use of O inappro lympicBack Squat 1100 priate d lifts are equipm ue to laDeadlift 1100 ent, low ck of exper ti teachinSnatch 3000 se, or a g1750 inexper tSnatch 2nd Pull ience; t hlete 2900 p5500 ipa rinc l he basi c 1750 incorpo s shoulClean 2950 d still b loaded, rated ( eClean 2nd Pull 5500 multi-jo externa 2650Jerk explosi int, low lly 2600 5400 ve mov er body ement) *Total pull: Lift-off until maximal vertical velocity **2nd pull: Transition until maximal vertical barbell velocity
  • EXERCISE SELECTION: POWER
  • Heavy-Low Rep vs. Light-High Rep
  • Weight Training Guidelines• 1-3x/ week• Short but intense workouts• 20-40 minutes per session is sufficient• High load / low rep and / or explosive emphasis• Train the entire body• Use appropriate rest intervals
  • Bodyweight strength exercises are great for muscular endurance, work capacity,strength maintenance and when facility / equipment access is limited
  • PlyometricsIntensity is directly relatedto vertical displacement andpoints of contact (1 leg vs 2)Can and should occasionallybe mixed in with runningQuality rather than quantityis importantAppropriate mechanics arecritical
  • RUNNING ECONOMY:HOW STRENGTH & POWER TRAINING CAN AFFECT ENDURANCE
  • MECHANISMS OF BENEFIT• Running economy is a result of enhanced neuromuscular characteristics like improved muscle power development and more efficient use of stored elastic energy• Resistance training using heavier loads or explosive movements improves muscle power and enhances the ability to store and use elastic energy
  • •2.9% Impr•4.6% Impr oved Per formanc oved Eco e no my
  • Evidence Supporting Evidence Refuting Resistance Training Resistance Training• K Stkren, J Helgerud, E Stka, and J Hoff. Maximal Strength Training Improves Running Economy in Distance Runners. MSSE 2008• G Millet, B Jaouen, F Borrani, and R Candau. Effects of concurrent endurance and strength training on running economy and VO2 kinetics. MSSE 2002.• J Esteve-Lanao, M Rhea, S Fleck,   and A Lucia.  Running Specific Periodized Strength Training Attenuates Loss of Stride Length during intense Endurance Running.   JSCR 2008.• And MUCH MORE
  • CORE?
  • d -numbing Myth: Min e ab s” are threps of “ s trengthenbe st way to the core
  • d -numbing Myth: Min e ab s” are threps of “ s trengthenbe st way to the coreReality: The prim ary role of the c ore is controll ing flexiextensio on, n and ro tation
  • d -numbing Myth: Min e ab s” are th Reality: Rreps of “ unning & s trengthen loaded exebe st way to rcises are at the core least as b eneficialReality: The prim ary role of the c ore is controll ing flexiextensio on, n and ro tation
  • d -numbing Myth: Min e ab s” are th Reality: Rreps of “ unning & s trengthen loaded exebe st way to rcises are at the core least as b eneficialReality: The prim ary role of the c ta tional & ore is Real ity: Ro controll x ercises ing flexi ( back) eextensio n and ro on, a nterior rporated tation must be inco
  • Core Strength• Refers to functional capacity & positioning of core of body• Use static & dynamic exercises• Whole body movements requiring mid-line stabilization are beneficial
  • Activity of trunk muscles during squats and pulls from the floor (dead lifts) is greater or equal to that produced with many common stability ball exercises.Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research, Volume 22, Issue 1, Pages 95-102, 2008.Trunk Muscle Activity During Stability Ball and Free Weight Exercises: Nuzzo, McCaulley, Cormie, Cavill, and McBride
  • Core Training
  • Core Training
  • Flexibil ity TraRotten Core ining
  • ROLE OF FLEXIBILITY FOR SOCCER
  • e soreness esn’t reduc ou sore etching do an MAKE y•Str•Over stretching c
  • •Stretching makes you weaker (a cute)
  • ching makes you s lower (acute)•Stret g = more slower•More stretchin
  • le? xibFle o To
  • Stretching May Not Decrease Injury
  • Stewart & Burden, 2004DANGER OF HYPERMOBILITY
  • Due to t he dema the spor nds of Stewart & Burden, 2004 t, socce need mo r players re flexibi other at lity than hletes b usually t ut as is he case much is , too never go odDANGER OF HYPERMOBILITY
  • YEARLY PLANNING
  • PL ANAH EA
  • OFF-SEASON TRAINING:PUT HAY IN THE BARN
  • UNDERSTAND THIS
  • IN-SEASON TRAINING
  • Usecommon sense!
  • IN-SEASON TRAINING CONSIDERATIONS• Pre-game training for those not selected• Post-game training for bench players who see minimal or no time• Maintaining fitness while minimizing likelihood for soreness and fatigue
  • INJURY REDUCTION
  • Many Injuries are Preventable
  • INJURY DATA Here is what the latest research tells us regarding what types of soccer injuries occur:Most common boys’ injuries:o Ankle sprains (16.5% of all boys’ injuries)o Thigh and upper leg strains (10.3%)o Concussions (9.3%)Most common girls’ injuries:o Ankle sprains (20.8% of all girls’ injuries)o Concussions (12.0%)o Knee sprains (10.6%)o Thigh and upper leg strains (9.6%)Amount of time lost following injury:o Less than one week (55.0% of all injuries)o One to three weeks (28.6%)o More than three weeks (16.4%)
  • INJURY CORRELATES• Previous injury• Aerobic fitness prior to season• Asymmetries• Flexibility deficiencies
  • PERFORMANCE & INJURY Performance
  • PERFORMANCE & INJURY Performance Injury Prevention
  • WARMUP
  • ROLE OF THE WARMUP• Ready the body and mind for practice / games: • Increase core body temperature • Improve performance • Reduction of injury • Psychologically, neurologically, physiologically prime • Training stimulus?
  • WARMUP CONSIDERATIONS• Timing• Physical & Technical• Practice vs. Games • In-game sideline warmups• General guidelines • Duration
  • WARMUP EXAMPLE
  • PRE-MATCH PRIMER
  • ATHLETE MONITORING
  • SURVEYSIf you want to know....ask!
  • HEART RATE• Heart rate is a great indicator of training intensity• Current technology allows longitudinal tracking of every player on a team
  • S ng P i G k r acT
  • Time-MotionQuantifying fitness values from practice & games
  • The Future is Here
  • HRV & OMEGA WAVE
  • Field tests are the most ‘real-world’ and pragmatic means of assessingreadiness but may be logistically difficult to incorporate on a frequent and regular
  • FIELD TESTING• Aerobic: Bleep, Yo-Yo1 & 2, XC Runs, Cooper test, etc• Agility: Arrow head, Illinois, Pro-Agility, etc• Speed: 10m, 20m, 30m, 40m• Repeat Sprint Ability: 6 x 30m w/ 30 sec rest, etc• Strength: weight room and body weight• Power: power output, vertical jump, etc
  • PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER
  • MANAGING FATIGUE &ENHANCING RECOVERY
  • Tra vel Str ess
  • SLEEP & REST
  • NUTRITION • Daily • Training • Pre-training • Post-training • Games • Pre-gamesMan City “Nutrition Locker” • Half-time
  • Facilitating Recovery?Teach lifestyle habitsActive recovery sessions?Manual therapyCryo therapy
  • facilitates recover y•Cold water immer sion•But not for the reasons you think...
  • Fitness is moreth an just running and lifting
  • Fitness is moreth an just running and lifting Manage fatigue & player readiness
  • Fitness is moreth an just running and lifting Manage fatigue & player readiness Plan, track, monitor, repeat
  • Fitness is moreth an just running and lifting Manage fatigue & player readiness Smarter beat s harder any d ay Plan, track, monitor, repeat
  • @MIKEYOUNGFITFORFUTBOL.COMELITETRACK.COMATHLETICLAB.COMHPCSPORT.COMMIKE@ATHLETICLAB.COM THANKS