What Can An Educator Do And Interactive Strategies
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What Can An Educator Do And Interactive Strategies

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What Can An Educator Do And Interactive Strategies What Can An Educator Do And Interactive Strategies Presentation Transcript

  • What Can An Educator Do?
  • What Can An Educator Do?
    • Innovate - are there new ways of presenting an activity or idea?
    • Adapt - Can other ideas be suggested?
    • Modify - Is there possibility for change?
    • Minimize - Can some activities be subtracted?
    • Substitute - What can be used instead?
    • Re-arrange - Is it possible to interchange some items?
    • Reverse - Can opposites be given?
    • Combine - is it possible to blend or to give an assortment?
    What Can An Educator Do? (Continued)
    • What I hear, I forget
    • What I see, I remember
    • What I do, I understand
    • What I hear, I forget
    • What I hear and see, I remember a little
    • What I hear and see, and ask questions about or discuss with someone else, I begin to understand.
    • What I hear, see, discuss, and do, acquire knowledge and skill.
    • What I teach to another, I master.
    • Sage on stage
    Paradigm Shifts in Education Depositor of knowledge Empty vessel/ receptacle 2 intelligences Content 1 content content/ process multiple intelligences multiple intelligences producer constructor of knowledge facilitator Guide on the side
    • Information for transformation and formation
    Paradigm Shifts in Education Information only (Continued) Teach for testing Answering pedagogy Classroom is the learning place Teach for learning Creative and critical thinking Every place a learning place. The whole world is a learning arena.
    • Compartmentalized
    Paradigm Shifts in Education (Continued) connected Isolated, bits and pieces For classroom and grades only Curriculum of knowledge Values taught as a separate subject integrated, borderless, seamless for life connectedness, life relatedness curriculum of life values integration in all lessons
  • Multiple Intelligences
    • Word Smart
    • Number Smart
    • People Smart
    • Self Smart
    • Art Smart
    • Music smart
    • Body Smart
    • Nature Smart
    • Role Smart
  • DO YOU KNOW THESE LEARNERS ?
  • MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES
  • VERBAL / LINGUISTIC LEARNERS SKILLED MANIPULATORS OF LANGUAGE PLAY WITH WORDS / COMMUNICATE WELL ARE GOOD IN: READING WRITING MEMORIZING LEARNS BEST THROUGH: HEARING SEEING REPEATING are who can They will be great poets, writers, statespersons, tutors, and mediators
  • Parts of Speech
    • A noun is a person, thing, or place: like man or school or the nose on your face.
    • A pronoun is a sub for nouns: like I and we, you and me, she, her, it, them, they, him, he.
    • An adjective describes those two: Which one? What kind? how many, those?
    • A verb is a busy kind of thing: run, walk, must, be, try and sing.
    • An adverb provides lots of info, like how? When? Where? Yes and no.
    • Prepositions pull noun into a phase: in, on, with, of and around are some ways.
    • Conjunction connect anything they want: like and or, nor, so, yet, for, but.
    • Interjection we use more than we know: wow, ouch, gee, boo and oh!
    • Now that we have a grammar rap, parts of speech will be a snap
    Parts of Speech
  • Fun with Phonics
    • Look at the canoe to find the paddle
    • Look the horse and find the ______.
    • Look on the flower to find the bee.
    • Look in the forest to find the ______.
    • Look in the oven to find the roast.
    • Look in the toaster to find the _____.
    • Look in the table to find the dish.
    • Look in the aquarium to find the _____.
    • Look in the house to find the chair.
    • Go outside to find fresh ___.
    • Look in the nest to find the kitty.
    • Look in the map to find the _____.
    • Look in the kitchen to find the cook.
    • Look in the bookcase to find the ____.
    • Look on the vine to find the berry.
    • Look on the tree to find the _____.
    • Look in the snow to find the sled.
    • Look in the house to find ____.
    Fun with Phonics
  • Fun with Rhyming Words
    • Go to the sea and find a fish
    • Close your eyes and make a wish
    • Look at the window and find a sparrow
    • Get into your room and get a pillow
    • Step out your door and shout for joy
    • Twinkle your eyes and see a boy
    • Ride on the jeep and find a driver
    • Get a beeper and you’ll have a lover
    • So everybody clap your hands
    • Let’s go and enjoy with some bands.
  • are VISUALIZERS * ARE PROFICIENT IN RECOGNIZING OBJECTS * ARE GOOD IN CREATING PICTURES IN MIND and REFERRED TO AS DAY DREAMERS WHO LIKE TO DRAW, BUILD, CREATE, TINKER OBJECTS THEY CAN BECOME SUCCESFUL ARTISTS, ARCHITECTS, NAVIGATORS. who are and later SPACIAL LEARNERS
  • are INQUISITIVE LEARNERS WHO HAVE THE NEED TO FIND ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS ENJOYS: EXPLORING PATTERNS WORKING WITH NUMBERS EXCEL IN: MATH REASONING LOGIC PROBLEM SOLVING LEARN BEST WITH WORK REQUIRING: CATEGORIZING CLASSIFYING ABSTRACT PATTERNS WILL DO WELL IN MATHEMATICS, TECHNOLOGY, AND RESEARCH LOGICAL/MATHEMATHICAL LEARNERS
  • ARE SOCIALIZERS WHO * ARE EXTROVERTS * HAVE MANY FRIENDS * BELONG TO MANY GROUPS * TALK EASILY TO PEOPLE * UNDERSTAND OTHERS GOOD LEARNERS WHO ORGANIZE MEDIATE COMMUNICATE MOTIVATE WHO WILL BE SUCCESSFUL IN POLITICS CHURCH EDUCATION INTERPERSONAL LEARNERS
  • * ARE MORE INTROSPECTIVE * PREFER TO WORK ALONE AT THEIR OWN PACE, THEIR OWN THING, IN THEIR OWN SPACE * FOLLOW THEIR OWN INTERESTS * PURSUE THEIR FEELINGS, DREAMS, GOALS, AND INTERESTS WHO AWARE OF THEMSELVES * KNOW THEIR OWN STRENGTH AND WEAKNESSES * FIND CREATIVE WAYS TO COMPENSATE THEIR SHORTCOMINGS * KNOW HOW TO ENHANCE THEIR STRENGTH INTERPERSONAL LEARNERS (continued)
  • * LOVE RYTHYM * SING OR HUM * ENJOY LISTENING TO MUSIC * PLAY INSTRUMENT * RESPOND WITH THE BODY are people who normally ARE GOOD IN THE USE OF RYTHYM AND CREATIVE EXPRESSIONS and WILL BE SUCCESFUL COMPOSERS, VOCALIST, MUSICIANS, MUSIC DIRECTORS SO THEY NEED MORE CREATIVE WORK AND CALM ENVIRONMENT MUSICAL LEARNERS
    • In a canyon sat a canner
    • Tapping, tapping on a pan.
    • Oh, he had a happy manner
    • And he flapped his hat to fan.
    • On a saddle rode young Adam
    • He was galloping alone,
    • But the din and racket stopped him
    • And he burst into a song.
    • “ Stop the clatter; what’s the matter?
    • Rapping, tapping in that can;
    • Take a nap and you’ll get fatter
    • You’re a very fragile man.”
    • But the canner, lean and lanky,
    • From the vat from which he sat
    • Called back, “Witty wag, you’re cranky.”
    • And he flapped and flapped his hat.
    • “ Cats don’t chatter, bats don’t batter
    • Snapping adders cannot add.
    • Hams don’t hammer, clams don’t clamor,
    • You’re a brash and nagging lad.”
  • Shape Song (Tune: London Bridge)
    • Circles, diamonds, triangles
    • Triangles, triangles
    • Circles, diamonds, triangles,
    • Hearts, squares and rectangles.
  • On A Farm (Tune: London Bridge)
    • Animals live on a farm, on a farm, on a farm
    • Animals live on a farm, with a farmer.
    • Cows and pigs live on a farm, on a farm, on a farm
    • Cows and pigs live on a farm, with a farmer.
    • Goats and sheep live on a farm, on a farm, on a farm
    • Goats and sheep live on a farm, with a farmer.
    • Hens and chicks live on a farm, on a farm, on a farm
    • Hens and chicks live on a farm, with a farmer
  • I Like Baby Animals (Tune: London Bridge)
    • I like baby animals
    • Animals, animals
    • I like baby animals,
    • I’ll name some for you
    • Kittens, puppies, chicks and foals
    • Kids and cubs, kids and cubs
    • Kittens, puppies, chicks and foals
    • I can put name some more
    • Goslings, ducklings, lambs and calves,
    • Lambs and calves, lambs and calves
    • Goslings, ducklings, lambs and calves
    • I like baby animals
  • Jesus is Our Friend (Tune: London Bridge)
    • Jesus is our friend today
    • Clap your hands, shout “Hurray!”
    • Jesus is our friend today
    • We love Jesus!
    • Jesus is our friend today
    • Stomp your feet, shout “Hurray!”
    • Jesus is our friend today
    • We love Jesus!
    • Jesus is our friend today
    • Turn around, shout “Hurray!”
    • Jesus is our friend today
    • We love Jesus!
  • ARE CALLED THE MOVERS WHO USE TOUCHING, MANEUVERING, AND BODY TO PROCESS INFORMATION EXCEL IN: SPORTS DANCING ACTING CRAFTS LEARN BEST * WHEN THEY MOVE WITH HIGH ENERGY * EXPRESS THEMSELVES AND SOLVE PROBLEMS THROUGH THE CONTROL AND MOVEMENT OF BODIES . CAN BECOME GOOD ACTORS, AND BALLERINAS BODY KINESTHETIC LEARNERS
  • INTERACTIVE WITH THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT ORDERING CATEGORIZING CLASSIFYING ARE WITH SKILLS IN CAN HAVE EXCELLENT CAREER IN : FORESTRY, AGRICULTURE, BOTANY AND…READINGS AND LEARNING RELATED TO ENVIRONMENTAL INTERESTS WILL BE MEANINGFUL TO THEM . THE NATURALISTIC LEARNERS
  • Type of Learners
    • Alone w/ a group
    • Bright dim
    • w/o stimulus w/ stimulus
    • w/o music w/music
    • Single task multi-task
    • Formal informal
    • w/ deadlines w/o deadlines
  • Analytic Students
    • Concentrate and learn when information presented in small, logical steps.
    • Respond to appeals of logic
    • Solve problems systematically and logically
    • Enjoy doing puzzles
    • Like putting things together by following specific directions.
    • Pay close attention to exact directions
    • Enjoy learning facts.
    • Learn phonics easily
    • Understand and apply phonic rules
    • Are analytical and critical when thinking
    • Can identify the details in the story
  • Global Students
    • Concentrate and learn when information is presented as a gestalt or whole
    • Respond to emotional appeals
    • Tend to like fantasy and humor
    • Get “wrapped up” in a story and do not concentrate on the facts
    • Process information subjectively and in patterns
    • Easily can identify main ideas in the story
    • Dislike memorizing facts
    • Learn easily through stories
    • Use story context often to figure out unknown words.
  • Strengths
    • Analytical
    • Details
    • Focus
    • Organization
    • Remembering specific
    • Direct answers
    • Global
    • Whole picture
    • Seeing relationships
    • Cooperating in group efforts
    • Reading between lines
    • Sense of fairness
    • Analytical
    • Consistency
    • Sense of justice
    • Objectivity
    • Individual cooperation
    • Doing one thing at a time
    • Global
    • Seeing options
    • Paraphrasing
    • Doing things at once
    • Giving/receiving praises
    • Leading body/agency/ getting others involved
  • Learning Styles They are educational conditions under which students are most likely to learn.
  • Elements of Learning Style
    • Environmental
    • Emotional
    sound light temperature design motivation persistence responsibility structure
    • Sociological
    • Physiological
    perceptual modalities visual mobility tactual auditory intake kinesthetic time of day alone/ pair w/ peers on a team authority varied
    • Psychological
    global/analytic right brain/left brain impulsive/reflective
  • Interactive Strategies
  • 10 + 2 (Ten Plus Two) Direct instruction variation where the teacher presents for ten minutes, students share and reflect for two minutes, then the cycle repeats.
  • 1 st TRIP (First TRIP) A reading strategy consisting of: Title, Relationships, Intent of questions, put in perspective.
  • 3 – 2 – 1 (Three – Two – One) Writing activity where the students write: 3 key terms from what they have just learned, 2 ideas they would like to learn more about, and 1 concept or skill they think they have mastered.
  • 5 + 1 (Five Plus One) Direct instruction variation where the teacher presents for five minutes, students share and reflect for one minute, then the cycle repeats.
  • Affinity A brainstorming approach that encourages less verbal members of a group to participate. First, all members of the group write responses to the problem or question on separate cards, then the cards are silently grouped by each member while the others observe. After a discussion, the agreed arrangement is recorded as an outline or diagram.
  • Agree / Disagree Matrix A formal approach to discussing and researching issues. Students are polled for agreement or disagreement with a statement and their responses as a group are recorded in the matrix. Students research the topic, and again their responses are recorded. Finally, small groups to meet to discuss the results and changes.
  • Agreement Circles Used to explore opinions. As students stand in a circle, facing each other, the teacher makes a statement. Students who agree with the statement step into the circle.
  • Baggage Claim Members in a new group are asked to write five interesting facts about themselves on a note card. For several minutes, people walk around the room, introducing themselves and sharing the facts on their cards. They then exchange cards (baggage) and move on to introduce themselves to others in the group. When time is up, the teacher or moderator collects all the cards and either returns them to their owners, or reads the facts and asks to identify the owner of the card (baggage).
  • Cubing A six-part technique to explore different aspects of a topic. The six parts include: describing, comparing, associating, analyzing, applying, arguing.
  • Devil’s Advocate To initiate or stimulate a discussion or debate, the teacher proposes or defends an extreme or unpopular viewpoint. Students will raise questions and challenge the teacher to explain. Students will also give their opinions.
  • Five Words – Three Words Students list five topic-related words independently. Students are grouped and share words. Groups pick best three words and explain to class.
  • Four Corners Label the four corners of the room with “Strongly Disagree, Disagree, Agree, Strongly Agree.” read a controversial statement and have students write on a piece of paper whether they agree, disagree, strongly agree or strongly disagree with the statement. When all are finished writing, have students go to the corner representing their point of view. All student sharing a point of view work together to collect evidences and present an argument supporting their beliefs.
  • Idea Spinner Teacher creates a spinner marked into four quadrants and labeled “Predict, Explain, Summarize, Evaluate.” after new material is presented, the teacher spins the spinner and asks students to answer a question based on the location of the spinner. For example, if the spinner lands in the “Summarize” quadrant, the teacher might say, “list the key concepts just presented.”
  • Inside – Outside Circle Review technique. Inside and outside circles of students face each other. Within each pair of facing students, students quiz each other with questions they have written. Outside circle moves to create new pairs. Repeat.
  • Line-up Student teams are given concepts that can be put in order. Each team member holds one concept and the members line up to represent the correct order.
  • List – Group – Label An activity to help students activate prior knowledge before beginning a new topic. Student teams divide list of key words into groups, then label each group.
  • Sketch to Stretch Sketch to Stretch is intended to help readers use sketches as a means of exploring, expressing, and sharing interpretations of selections
  • Lotus Blossom Technique From central idea, propose eight new ideas. For each of eight ideas, propose and evaluate necessary details to implement ideas.
  • Luck of the Draw All student’s names are put into a container. At the end of class, a student’s name is drawn at random from the container. At the beginning of the next class the student whose name was drawn is required to present a 3 – 5 minute review of the previous day’s lesson.
  • Minute Papers An end-of-class reflection in which students write briefly to answer the question: “What did you learn today? and “What question do you still have?”
  • Mock Trials Students learn about the legal system by assuming the roles of lawyers, witnesses, and judges to act out hypothetical legal cases.
  • Novelty A motivational technique to engage student early in instruction. Share something unusual with students to arouse their curiosity.
  • Numbered Heads Together Each student is assigned a number. Members of the group work together to agree on answer. Teacher randomly selects one number. Student with that number answers for the group.
  • One Sentence Summary Students are asked to write a single summary sentence that answers the “who, what, where, when, why, how” questions about the topic.
  • Panels A small group acts as experts to answer the questions of the people in the larger group. In a classroom setting, students are selected to become experts on a topic and are given at least a day to prepare for the discussion. Panel discussions can also be held using outside experts.
  • PMI (Plus, Minus, Interesting) A decision-making strategy where students silently list positive, negative and other aspects of a problem or solution. Aspects are shared as a group list. All alternatives are considered before decision is made.
  • Prediction Pairs Students are paired as they listen to the teacher read a passage aloud. At each pause in the reading, the teacher prompts students to discuss with their partner what they predict will happen next in the reading.
  • Randomized Questioning In situations where the teacher wants to ensure that all students have an opportunity to answer questions, the teacher creates note cards with the students’ names on them, then shuffles the cards. AFTER asking each question, the teacher reveals the name of the student chosen at random to answer the question.
  • Share – Pair Circles Divide class into two equal groups and each group forms a circle. The inner circle faces outward and the outer circle faces inward, to form pairs of facing students. In response to teacher questions, each pair discusses their ideas, then one of the circles rotates to create new pairs. Repeat until the original pairs are again facing each other.
  • STaR (Story Telling and Retelling) Teachers read stories to students then students retell the story by acting it out, answering questions, or writing about the story.
  • Stir the Teams Students are assigned to teams and each student in the team has a number (typically 1 through 4). Teams discuss their group answer to the teacher’s question, when the team is done they give a signal. When all teams are done, the teacher calls a number (from 1 to 4) and the students with that number rotate to the next group to share their team’s answer with their new team.
  • Story Impressions The teacher presents ten to fifteen terms to students prior to reading. These terms appear in the same order that they appear in the reading. Students write a passage using the terms that they think predicts what will happen in the reading. Students share their predictions with others. Finally, students read, comparing their predictions (story impressions) with the reading
  • Talking Chips Response management technique to encourage students who do not often contribute, and limit students who contribute too much to discussion.
  • Voting Cards Students can be given laminated cards at the beginning of the year to be used to express their opinions in class. When they agree with a statement, they might hold up a green card, disagreement could be signified with a red card, and yellow could be used to show indecision or uncertainty.
  • Walking Tour Passages from reading are posted in individual pages around the room. Groups tour the room and discuss each passage, then summarizes.
  • Think-Pair-Share Involves a three step cooperative structure. During the first step individuals think silently about a question posed by the instructor. Individuals pair up during the second step and exchange thoughts. In the third step, the pair share their responses with other pairs, other teams, of the entire group.
  • Jigsaw
    • Groups with 5 students are set up. Each group member is assigned some unique material to learn and then to teach his group members. To help in the learning students across the class working on the same sub-section get together to decide what is important and how to teach it. After practice in these “expert” groups the original groups perform and students teach each other. Test or assessment follows.
  • Three-Step Interview
    • Each member of a team chooses another member to be a partner. During the first step individuals interview their partners by asking clarifying questions. During the second step, partners reverse the roles. For the final step, members share their partner’s response with the team.
  • Round Robin Brainstorming
    • Class is divided into small groups (4 to 6) with one person appointed as the recorder. A question is posed with many answers and students are given time to think about answers. After the “think time,” members of the team share responses with one another round robin style. The recorder writes down the answers of the group members. The person next to the recorder starts and each person in the group in order gives an answer until time is called
  • Three-Minute review
    • Teachers stop any time during a lecture or discussion and give tem three minutes to review what has been said, ask clarifying questions or answer questions.
  • Team Pair solo
    • Students do problems first as a team, then with a partner, and finally on their own.
  • Circle the Sage
    • First the teacher polls the class to see which students have a special knowledge to share. Those students (the sages) stand and spread out in the room. The teacher then has the rest of the classmates each surround a sage, with no two members of the same team going to the same sage. The sage explains what they know while the classmates listen, ask questions, and take notes.
  • Partners
    • The class is divided into teams of four. Partners move to one side of the room. Half of each team is given an assignment to master to be able teach the other half. Partners work to learn can consult with other partners working on the same material. Teams go back together with each set of partners teaching the other set. Partners quiz and tutor teammates. Team reviews how well they learned and taught and how they might improve the process
  • SORT
    • S - State the details
    • O - Organize the data
    • R - React In Different Perspectives
    • T - Tell the class what you have learned
  • Graphic Organizers
    • A visual outline that provides pictorial of graphic format for summarizing key concepts, ideas and vocabulary
  • TGT
    • T - Talk about different issues
    • G - Generate as many ideas
    • T - Tell your consensus or agreements in class
  • REAP
    • R - Reading to discover the author’s ideas
    • E - Encoding the author’s ideas into one’s own language
    • A - Annotating those ideas in writing for oneself or for sharing with others
    • P - Pondering the significance of the annotation
  • Echo Reading
    • The reader is seated slightly in front of the teacher with both participants jointly holding the reading material. Both read in unison; the voice of the teacher is directed into the reader’s ear at this close range.
    • M ultiple Intelligences
    • I nteractive Integrative Learning
    • L earning by doing
    • E mpowerment of Teachers/Students
    • S kills Oriented
    • T otal Development of Students
    • O rganizers for easy learning
    • N ovel Strategies/Techniques
    • E nriching Activities
    • S tudent Centered Activities
    • You teach less by what you say, more by what you do but most by what you are.