0
Story Development
Computer Games
ResearchReport//StoryProduction//Dialogue//Evaluation
Story (narrative) vs Gameplay (ludu...
Story Development
Computer Games
ResearchReport//StoryProduction//Dialogue//Evaluation
Approaches
What is it that makes a ...
Story Development
Computer Games
ResearchReport//StoryProduction//Dialogue//Evaluation
Narratology
The theory and study of...
Story Development
Computer Games
ResearchReport//StoryProduction//Dialogue//Evaluation
stability  disruption  resolution...
Pulp Fiction and narrative structure
5
1) Vince
collects
briefcase
2) Vince dates
Mia
3) Vince killed
by Butch
4) Vince cl...
Story Development
Computer Games
ResearchReport//StoryProduction//Dialogue//Evaluation
Narratology & Gaming
Concerned with...
Story Development
Computer Games
ResearchReport//StoryProduction//Dialogue//Evaluation
Narrative decisions: Bioshock’s mor...
Story Development
Computer Games
ResearchReport//StoryProduction//Dialogue//Evaluation
Games as literature
“the concentrat...
Story Development
Computer Games
ResearchReport//StoryProduction//Dialogue//Evaluation
Games that are examples of the
narr...
Story Development
Computer Games
ResearchReport//StoryProduction//Dialogue//Evaluation
“That which has neither utility
nor...
Story Development
Computer Games
ResearchReport//StoryProduction//Dialogue//Evaluation
“When people talk about
videogames,...
Story Development
Computer Games
ResearchReport//StoryProduction//Dialogue//Evaluation
Ludology
From the root ‘ludus’ mean...
Story Development
Computer Games
ResearchReport//StoryProduction//Dialogue//Evaluation
More than identification
“When you ...
Story Development
Computer Games
ResearchReport//StoryProduction//Dialogue//Evaluation
3 Important Dimensions
1. Rules
2. ...
Traditional media are representational,
not simulational like games
15
Story Development
Computer Games
ResearchReport//StoryProduction//Dialogue//Evaluation
FILM GAME
Start
Start
End
Ends?
End...
Morality and player choices
17
Emergent narrative and immersion
18
Player choices and free will?
Story Development
Computer Games
ResearchReport//StoryProduction//Dialogue//Evaluation
What is it that makes a game ‘good’...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Computer Games - Story Writing Theory - Story vs Games

230

Published on

This material has been produced to be used on the BTEC Level 3 Games Development Extended Diploma (formerly National Diploma) course delivery. This resource can be adapted and amended for other relevant courses.

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
230
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
20
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transcript of "Computer Games - Story Writing Theory - Story vs Games"

  1. 1. Story Development Computer Games ResearchReport//StoryProduction//Dialogue//Evaluation Story (narrative) vs Gameplay (ludus)
  2. 2. Story Development Computer Games ResearchReport//StoryProduction//Dialogue//Evaluation Approaches What is it that makes a game ‘good’? • Is it the story that a game tells? • Is it the process of playing?
  3. 3. Story Development Computer Games ResearchReport//StoryProduction//Dialogue//Evaluation Narratology The theory and study of narrative and narrative structure and the way they affect our perception Russian Formalists • Tzvetan Todorov • Vladimir Propp • Victor Shklovsky
  4. 4. Story Development Computer Games ResearchReport//StoryProduction//Dialogue//Evaluation stability  disruption  resolution Act I Act II Act III Story (narrative) vs Gameplay (ludus)
  5. 5. Pulp Fiction and narrative structure 5 1) Vince collects briefcase 2) Vince dates Mia 3) Vince killed by Butch 4) Vince cleans car 5) Vince at the diner 1) Vince collects briefcase 4) Vince cleans car 5) Vince at the diner 2) Vince dates Mia 3) Vince killed by Butch
  6. 6. Story Development Computer Games ResearchReport//StoryProduction//Dialogue//Evaluation Narratology & Gaming Concerned with gaming as a new way of presenting a familiar story Allowing the player to enter a new world, to assume the role of a character
  7. 7. Story Development Computer Games ResearchReport//StoryProduction//Dialogue//Evaluation Narrative decisions: Bioshock’s moral imperative Harvest Save Player
  8. 8. Story Development Computer Games ResearchReport//StoryProduction//Dialogue//Evaluation Games as literature “the concentration of game designers and consumers on genres that are fairly low down the literary pecking order does little to add to the respectability of the computer game” B Atkins, 2003, More than a Game: The Computer Game as Fictional Form, Manchester: Manchester University Press. E.g. FPS?
  9. 9. Story Development Computer Games ResearchReport//StoryProduction//Dialogue//Evaluation Games that are examples of the narratology approach • Final Fantasy VII • Grand Theft Auto • Resident Evil • Zelda
  10. 10. Story Development Computer Games ResearchReport//StoryProduction//Dialogue//Evaluation “That which has neither utility nor truth nor likeness, nor yet, in its effects, is harmful, can best be judged by the criterion of the charm that is in it, and by the pleasure it affords. Such pleasure, entailing as it does no appreciable good or ill, is play” (Plato cited in Poole, 2002)
  11. 11. Story Development Computer Games ResearchReport//StoryProduction//Dialogue//Evaluation “When people talk about videogames, they tend to compare them with forms they already know and love: film, painting, literature and so on. But there’s one critical difference. What do you do with a video game? You play it.” (Poole 2002: 26) Defining ‘play’
  12. 12. Story Development Computer Games ResearchReport//StoryProduction//Dialogue//Evaluation Ludology From the root ‘ludus’ meaning ‘rule bound’ (see Callois, 2001) Although games have stories, these are seen by ludologists as incidental in the gaming experience.
  13. 13. Story Development Computer Games ResearchReport//StoryProduction//Dialogue//Evaluation More than identification “When you play a video game you enter into the world of the programmers who made it. You have to do more than identify with a character on the screen. You must act for it. Identification through action has a special kind of hold […] it puts people into a highly focused, and highly charged state of mind. For many people, what is being pursued in the video game is not just a score, but an altered state.” (Turkle, 1984/2003, 509)
  14. 14. Story Development Computer Games ResearchReport//StoryProduction//Dialogue//Evaluation 3 Important Dimensions 1. Rules 2. The material system (gameworld) 3. Gameplay
  15. 15. Traditional media are representational, not simulational like games 15
  16. 16. Story Development Computer Games ResearchReport//StoryProduction//Dialogue//Evaluation FILM GAME Start Start End Ends? Ends?
  17. 17. Morality and player choices 17
  18. 18. Emergent narrative and immersion 18
  19. 19. Player choices and free will?
  20. 20. Story Development Computer Games ResearchReport//StoryProduction//Dialogue//Evaluation What is it that makes a game ‘good’? • Is it the story that a game tells? • Is it the process of playing? Put forward your argument based on the title. Thinking about the issues discussed in this presentation. Site examples of games you have played- use screen shots if appropriate to illustrate your points. 500-600 words
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×