Blurring boundaries, shifting         perspectivesElycia Wallis, Ed Rodley, Janet Carding,     Sharon Grant, Adrian Kingst...
http://museumvictoria.com.au/collections/items/794227/photograph-collecting-wattle-archibald-james-campbell-dandenong-rang...
http://museumvictoria.com.au/collections/items/405651/mining-model-surfacing-puddling-shallow-alluvial-workings-victoria-c...
Ed Rodley @erodley
Janet Carding @janetcarding
Sharon Grant @rondlg
Adrian Kingston @adriankingston
What counts as useful data,         and what’s just stuff?Or, someone’s trash is another’s treasure.
http://museumvictoria.com.au/collections/items/748506/lantern-slide-brush-wattle-bird-nest-eggs-1920-1940
Are all collections equally friendly?Are there some parts of collections that only      discipline experts can interpret?
“Give us the data and get out of the way”             @wragge (Tim Sherratt)      Should we just build API’s?
Are things likely to get territorial?Who interprets objects of little scientific   value, but great cultural value?
The great thing about standards is that there       are so many to choose from. What can we usefully do with such variable...
Do you have any examples of sciences andhumanities merging, blending and assisting              each other?
Blurring boundaries, shifting perspectives - museum science meets history online.
Blurring boundaries, shifting perspectives - museum science meets history online.
Blurring boundaries, shifting perspectives - museum science meets history online.
Blurring boundaries, shifting perspectives - museum science meets history online.
Blurring boundaries, shifting perspectives - museum science meets history online.
Blurring boundaries, shifting perspectives - museum science meets history online.
Blurring boundaries, shifting perspectives - museum science meets history online.
Blurring boundaries, shifting perspectives - museum science meets history online.
Blurring boundaries, shifting perspectives - museum science meets history online.
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Blurring boundaries, shifting perspectives - museum science meets history online.

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This set of slides formed the background and introduction to a roundtable discussion at MCN2012. Panellists were Ed Rodley (Museum of Science, Boston, USA), Janet Carding (Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto, Canada), Sharon Grant (Field Museum, Chicago, USA), and Adrian Kingston (Te Papa, Wellington, NZ).
Session abstract:
Multidisciplinary museums have opportunities for active collaboration and participation by experts in varying fields. However, differing methodologies and approaches have traditionally meant that there is still a divide. New technologies are helping to bridge that disciplinary gap, allowing scientists, anthropologists and historians to share data, interpretation and experience in ways they have not been able to before. Digitisation of collection information, and release of large datasets into the public domain allow techniques such as data mining, transcription and semantic linking to open new ways to interpret museum collections information, to the benefit of all.

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Blurring boundaries, shifting perspectives - museum science meets history online.

  1. 1. Blurring boundaries, shifting perspectivesElycia Wallis, Ed Rodley, Janet Carding, Sharon Grant, Adrian Kingston @elyw @erodley @janetcarding @rondlg @adriankingston #mcn2012musci
  2. 2. http://museumvictoria.com.au/collections/items/794227/photograph-collecting-wattle-archibald-james-campbell-dandenong-ranges-victoria-circa-1900
  3. 3. http://museumvictoria.com.au/collections/items/405651/mining-model-surfacing-puddling-shallow-alluvial-workings-victoria-circa-1857
  4. 4. Ed Rodley @erodley
  5. 5. Janet Carding @janetcarding
  6. 6. Sharon Grant @rondlg
  7. 7. Adrian Kingston @adriankingston
  8. 8. What counts as useful data, and what’s just stuff?Or, someone’s trash is another’s treasure.
  9. 9. http://museumvictoria.com.au/collections/items/748506/lantern-slide-brush-wattle-bird-nest-eggs-1920-1940
  10. 10. Are all collections equally friendly?Are there some parts of collections that only discipline experts can interpret?
  11. 11. “Give us the data and get out of the way” @wragge (Tim Sherratt) Should we just build API’s?
  12. 12. Are things likely to get territorial?Who interprets objects of little scientific value, but great cultural value?
  13. 13. The great thing about standards is that there are so many to choose from. What can we usefully do with such variable data?
  14. 14. Do you have any examples of sciences andhumanities merging, blending and assisting each other?

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