I N T E R N AT I O N A L A S S O C I AT I O N O F M U S E U M F A C I L I T Y A D M I N I S T R AT O R S         PAPYRUS  ...
Positive Varming Environments                   since 1933Steensen Varming and Varming International Alliance provideunriv...
ContentsLetter from the Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2             The National Geographic Soc...
Letter from the EditorJoe MayEditor, PapyrusGreetings from Los Angeles!                     and construction, as well as i...
Message from the PresidentJohn de LucyPresident, IAMFAT       his will be my last “Message from      learning from our pee...
Introducing the AmericanInstitute for Conservation ofArtistic and Historic Works—Collection Care NetworkBy the AIC Collect...
Felicity Devlin. Some modules havealready been posted on the AIC wiki,              Board of the AIC Collection Care Netwo...
Who’s Afraid of Green Museums                         Fear and Loathing and HVAC                         By Elizabeth Wyli...
The Experts  Since we designed the session in an unconventional way, each expert provided an unconventional bio.  Elizabet...
The scene is 45 minutes into an hour-long project kick-          representation on the Building Committee—includingoff mee...
Studies show, however, that working with a truly integrated   the budget by looking at the following three areas ofdesign ...
efforts, which can improve both climate control margins           a green skeptic, did concede that, as environmental resp...
has been, and will continue to be, facilitated by new thinking                   reliant on increasingly at-risk resources...
Benchmarking Options:                             New Energy Survey and Classic                             Comprehensive ...
INSPIRED DESIGN,                          INNOVATIVE ENGINEERING            CLIENTS INCLUDE:           Baltimore Museum of...
The Philadelphia Museum of ArtBy Rich ReinertT       he Philadelphia Museum of Art is housed in a unique       and spectac...
Yo, Philly!By Rich ReinertY         o! Prepare to learn a unique version of the English         language. The key is to tr...
External Vertical Shade AutomationProject at the California Academyof SciencesBy Hershow Al-BaraziT      he California Aca...
This screen also allows the Operations Departmentto remotely extend or retract the shades for regularmaintenance.   Employ...
The National Geographic Societyis a LEED-EB Recertification StarBy Michael ArnyT       he National Geographic Society     ...
During the past nine years, the       • Formation of a corporate Go Green                     Michael Arny, President ofNa...
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Papyrus Summer Fall 2012
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Papyrus Summer Fall 2012

  1. 1. I N T E R N AT I O N A L A S S O C I AT I O N O F M U S E U M F A C I L I T Y A D M I N I S T R AT O R S PAPYRUS VOL. 13, NO. 2 SUMMER–FALL 2012 Carbon Management at National Museums Liverpool Who’s Afraid of Introducing the American The Philadelphia Green Museums: Institute for Conservation of Museum of Art—Fear and Loathing Artistic and Historic Works— One Venue for the IAMFA and HVAC Collection Care Network Annual Conference
  2. 2. Positive Varming Environments since 1933Steensen Varming and Varming International Alliance provideunrivalled expertise in museum, gallery and archive projects. The Clore Gallery, Tate, London Nomura Gallery, Tate, London Building Services Solutions Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem Casula Powerhouse Museum, Sydney Tate in the North, Liverpool Museum of Modern Art, London Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Chester Beatty Library, Dublin Australian War Memorial, Canberra The Mint Building, Sydney Victoria & Albert Museum, London Buildings Sir John Soanes Museum, London Science Museum, Wellcome Wing, London Whitechapel Art Gallery, London Frederikborg Castle, Copenhagen Sculpture Museum, London Auckland Art Gallery, Auckland National Portrait Gallery, Canberra National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Library of Australia, Sydney Physiology Australian Museum, Sydney Royal Scottish Academy / Playfair, Edinburgh Guinness Storehouse Visitor Centre, Dublin Prehistoric Museums Arhus, The Utzon Centre, Aalborg Strategies Sydney Opera House, SydneyAustralia Denmark Hong Kong Ireland (Varming) United Kingdom (SVM) www.steensenvarming.com
  3. 3. ContentsLetter from the Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 The National Geographic Society is a LEED-EB Recertification Star. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18Message from the President . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2012 IAMFA Conference Schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20Introducing the American Institute for Carbon Management at National MuseumsConservation of Artistic and Historic Works— Liverpool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24Collection Care Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Awards for the Auckland Art Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28Who’s Afraid of Green Museums: Fear andLoathing and HVAC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Architect of the Capitol’s Office of Security Programs Recognized for Excellence inBenchmarking Options: New Energy Survey Customer Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30and Classic Comprehensive Survey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 IAMFA Environmental Group Meeting—The Philadelphia Museum of Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Manchester Museum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Regional Updates and Member News . . . . . . . . . . . . 34Yo, Philly! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 IAMFA Members—Organizations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36External Vertical Shade Automation Projectat the California Academy of Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Index of Papyrus Technical and Historical Articles . . . 38Cover photo: Inside the Conservatory at Longwood Gardens, venue for the 2012 IAMFA Conference. Photo by Joe MayIAMFA BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEMBER REGIONSPresident Secretary Atlanta, U.S.A. — Kevin Streiter, Ottawa-Gatineau, Canada —John de Lucy Patricia Morgan High Museum of Art Ed Richard,The British Library (Retired) Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tamaki ¯ kevin.streiter@woodruffcenter.org National Gallery of Canada ERichard@Gallery.caLondon, United Kingdom Auckland, New Zealand Australia — Ray McMasterjohn.delucy@btinternet.com patricia.morgan@ rmc.master@bigpond.com Philadelphia, USA — John Castle, aucklandcouncil.govt.nz Winterthur Museum & GardenV.P., Administration Chicago, USA — William Caddick, jcastle@winterthur.orgRandy Murphy Assistant Secretary/Editor Art Institute of ChicagoLos Angeles County Museum of Art Joseph E. May Northern California, USA — wcaddick@artic.edu Joe Brennan,Los Angeles, CA, USA Sustainability Engineer San Francisco Museum of Modern ArtRMurphy@lacma.org Los Angeles, CA, USA Los Angeles, USA — Randy Murphy, jbrennan@sfmoma.org joemay001@hotmail.com Los Angeles County Museum of ArtV.P., Regional Affairs and rmurphy@lacma.org United Kingdom — Jack Plumb,2012 Conference Chair 2013 Conference Chair National Library of ScotlandJohn Castle Nancy Bechtol New England, USA — j.plumb@nls.ukWinterthur Museum, Smithsonian Institution John H. Lannon, Boston Athenaeum Washington/Baltimore, USA —Garden and Library Washington, DC, USA Maurice Evans, lannon@bostonathenaeum.orgWinterthur, DE, USA bechtna@si.edu Smithsonian Institutionjcastle@winterthur.org New York, USA — Mark Demairo, evansma@si.edu Neue GalerieTreasurer For more information on becomming For additional markdemairo@neuegalerie.orgAlan Dirican a member of the InternationalBaltimore Museum of Art contact information, New Zealand — Patricia Morgan, Association of Museum FacilityBaltimore, MD, USA please visit our website at Auckland Art Gallery Administrators, please visitadirican@artbma.org www.iamfa.org patricia.morgan@aucklandcity.govt.nz www.iamfa.orgIAMFA/ Papyrus Maurice Evans Printed in the U.S.A. by Statements of fact and opinionVol. 13, Number 2 Joe May Knight Printing are made on the responsibility ofSummer–Fall 2012 Patricia Morgan authors alone and do not imply an ISSN 1682-5241 opinion on the part of the editors, Jack Plumb officers, or members of IAMFA. TheEditor Rich Reinert editors of IAMFA Papyrus reserve theJoe May Ian Williams right to accept or to reject any Article Stacey Wittig or advertisement submitted forCorrespondents Elizabeth Wylie publication.Michael Arny While we have made every attempt toHershow Al-Barazi Design and Layout ensure that reproduction rights haveChris Bailey Phredd Grafix been acquired for the illustrations Past issues of Papyrus canNiall Cooper used in this newsletter, please letDan Davies Editing be found on IAMFAs us know if we have inadvertentlyJohn De Lucy Artistic License website: www.IAMFA.org overlooked your copyright, and we will rectify the matter in a future issue.
  4. 4. Letter from the EditorJoe MayEditor, PapyrusGreetings from Los Angeles! and construction, as well as in ongoing Ian Williams and Chris Bailey of the operations. Museum of Liverpool describe some ofA s I write this, we are now just You’ll read about the Philadelphia the actions taken over the past 12 years two months from IAMFA’s 22nd Art Museum, which is a venue for the in understanding, managing and reduc- Annual Conference in the Mid- IAMFA Conference in September, and ing energy consumption, as well as theAtlantic region of the United States. Theconference organizing committee reports you’ll be able to practice up on your carbon impact of National Museumsthat progress in planning this year’s colloquial Philadelphia terminology so Liverpool (NML) on society. These actionsconference is on track, and both the that you can be prepared to speak as the have culminated in NML recently beingcommittee and the IAMFA Board are locals do . . . you never know when this placed joint first in the UK Carbon Reduc-eager to see IAMFA members again in may come in handy while in Philadelphia tion National League Tables. NationalSeptember at venues in Philadelphia for the 2012 IAMFA Annual Conference! Museums Liverpool is a group of nineand the surrounding region. Hershow Al-Barazi has contributed museums and galleries from Liverpool. Please make sure you read John an interesting article about the External You’ll also read about recognition ofDe Lucy’s Message from the President in Vertical Shade Automation Project at the the Architect of the Capitol’s Office ofthis issue of Papyrus, as this will be his greenest museum on Earth. Many of you Security Programs by Building Operatingfinal one. John has been a superb leader visited the California Academy of Sciences Management Magazine with its FMXcel-for IAMFA during the past four years, during the 2010 IAMFA Conference in lence Award for excellence in customerand we all look forward to seeing him San Francisco, but may not be aware service. The FMXcellence awards recog-and wife Livi this September at the con- that they received their second LEED nize facilities management teams thatference. We all hope that, despite his Platinum award in 2011. You will also find “spearhead and execute stand-out projectsretiring from the British Library, John an update from Pat Morgan about the and programs.” You may remember thatwill continue to remain active in IAMFA. many awards received by the Auckland we visited the U.S. Capitol during our In this issue of Papyrus, you will find Art Gallery during the past year. The 2009 IAMFA Conference.a variety of articles both from IAMFA Auckland Art Gallery was a venue for the Please make sure you also read themembers, and non-members who are 2011 IAMFA Conference, and host of a update about the latest U.K. Regionalleaders in their field. Please read the truly unforgettable closing gala at the Meeting hosted by Nicola Walker, Headarticle in this issue contributed by the 2011 Conference. We will never forget that evening; I wish everyone reading of Collection Care and Access at theAmerican Institute of Conservators. This Manchester Museum. There is more newsarticle provides an introduction to AIC— this could have been present. Michael Arny, President at the about the growing movement to reassessand, we hope, the beginning of a grow- Leonardo Academy, writes in this issue temperature and RH settings. Please alsoing collaborative effort between AIC and about LEED certification at the National see Stacey Wittig’s update about the IAMFAIAMFA members to evaluate possible Geographic Society. You may remember Annual Benchmarking Exercise—andrevisions to environmental specifica- Michael from when he joined us in Bilbao, make sure you plan on attending thetions, and how this could foster higherlevels of energy conservation at cultural Spain at the 2006 IAMFA Conference. Benchmarking and Learning Workshopinstitutions in America and beyond. Michael and I made a joint presentation September 16 in Philadelphia. You will also find an article by Elizabeth about the Getty Center’s new LEED-EB One last thing; I’d like to report thatWylie and Niall Cooper titled “Who’s Certification in 2005, which was the first IAMFA’s LinkedIn Group continuesAfraid of Green Museums: Fear and post-pilot LEED-EB Certification in the to grow, now with 358 members fromLoathing and HVAC”. This article is a nation. Michael actually chaired the com- 31 countries. If you know someone whomfollow-up to a session at the American mittee that developed LEED for Existing you think may benefit from learningAssociation of Museum’s (AAM) Annual Buildings. You will read about the organi- more about IAMFA, please encourageConference in Minneapolis in late April zation that received the very first LEED- them to join our LinkedIn group, and2012. During a provocative forum, experts EB Certification in the nation during to also visit our new website,examined many of the questions that the LEED-EB pilot program back in www.NewIAMFA.ORG.arise when museums undertake a capital 2003. Congratulations to the National There’s more in this issue; I hope youproject and want to pursue environ- Geographic Society on their new LEED enjoy it. Thank you so much to everyonementally sustainable practice in design recertification at the Gold level. who contributed articles.2 PAPYRUS SUMMER–FALL 2012
  5. 5. Message from the PresidentJohn de LucyPresident, IAMFAT his will be my last “Message from learning from our peers how they have The excellent guest programme for the President” before I hand over improved delivery of facilities services, our partners, I know, is also an enormous to your new President at our Mid- so we can return home and make our attraction. Please do everything you canAtlantic conference in September. I have own improvements—ample justification to attend, learn what others are doing,really enjoyed the past four years, and for attending our conference! and renew friendships with your col-thank you all for your support—both The third benefit has been participa- leagues. The hard times and financialto me, and to our organisation—during tion in the benchmarking group to com- pressures you currently face are not likelythis period, particularly through your pare how we were managing our costs to abate in the year ahead, so it is essentialparticipation at our conferences in against similar cultural organisations, that you and your facilities departmentsWashington, San Francisco, and Auckland, and learning from them how to manage continue to demonstrate where you addall of which have been such a success. better. The fourth is the strong bonds value to your organisations—hopefully John Castle and his team have put and friendships you build up with like- reducing the risk of your role beingtogether a wonderful programme for minded professionals—both to discuss questioned or removed. Hopefully youthis year’s Mid-Atlantic conference in ideas and help solve problems at your have learned enough through IAMFA toPhiladelphia and Delaware. We will be show that you are not just a cost centre, own organisation—again supported byvisiting eight top museums and galleries, but can have a highly positive business Joe May in his management of a largewhich I know you will find fascinating impact on your cultural organisation. and growing LinkedIn group.and helpful in solving some of your local Have you delivered a material reduction At this year’s conference, you willfacilities problems. I understand that we in operating costs over the past two not be able to resist Monday’s tour ofalready have 120 people booked into years, and are you seen as an integratedhotels, so this one might even be bigger the Philadelphia Museum of Art, which business manager by the rest of yourthan the London conference in 2008! is an amazing building that has just corporate colleagues? It has been tempting to want to expand finished a major extension. Following Many thanks again to our Board forIAMFA into a much larger association. that tour, we’ll be heading to the newly supporting me over the past four years,I have belonged to large associations in refurbished Rodin Museum, and a brand- and helping make IAMFA a much morethe past, however, and they do lose the new museum: The Barnes Foundation, professional organisation. Also to myclose friendships which we build together completed during this summer. previous PA, Merida Fitzgerald, for beingat IAMFA, as well as requiring costly Tuesday will be a real treat, as we the power (engine?) behind the role, andadministration and infrastructure. It is tour and learn about four museums in Harry Wanless for his help and supportthe close relationships, friendliness and Delaware, three of which are linked to at the British Library (mostly rewritingwillingness to help—plus the fun that the Du Pont family. We’ll all end the day everything I did)! Harry, rude as always,we have when we meet—that has made with a lovely dinner in the Longwood did think Merida was the real President,this organisation my favourite of all Gardens Conservatory, followed by a and I was just the frontman!the professional organisations to which stunning Fountain Show. The huge One minor achievement: I think II have belonged. fountain pump house will excite even have persuaded my American friends to I have received four key benefits from those without an engineering bent! be more adventurous in wearing colour -my association with IAMFA. The first is the Wednesday is based around the ful socks—but unfortunately not to undopublication of Papyrus, which contains Independence National Historical Park. the mistake they made in 1776.such relevant and interesting articles—and We’ll go behind the scenes of a newly I hope to see you all at the conferencehas been made such a success by Joe May finished museum, tour the National in September, when you can tell me howover the past four years. The second is the Constitution Centre, and visit the Liberty you are managing in these tough times.learning opportunity in going behind Bell (still with a crack, thank goodness!), When you receive this issue of Papyrus,the scenes of the world’s best museums before our Gala dinner in the National I will be in Tuscany preparing for my fulland galleries at each annual conference, Constitution Center. retirement—see photo above! PAPYRUS SUMMER–FALL 2012 3
  6. 6. Introducing the AmericanInstitute for Conservation ofArtistic and Historic Works—Collection Care NetworkBy the AIC Collection Care NetworkH ave you ever had difficulty worked to support the critical work of become available since its previous obtaining professional conser- collection care by bringing together print edition. Moving the publication vation advice on a specialized preservation organizations, profes- to the web will expand access and im-topic? Would you like easy-to-navigate sionals, and information resources. prove timely integration of new infor-access to the conservation community? The Network’s aim is to foster dynamic mation. Review and critique of draftDid you know that many conservators exchange among those engaged in segments will be possible on-line. Lookhave wanted to be better connected to preventive care, to expand the body for the STASH link in 2013 on thethe professional facility management of preventive care knowledge, and to Conservation OnLine (CoOL) websitecommunity? disseminate this knowledge in order to at www.cool.conservation-us.org. To facilitate this kind of connection support the work of all collection care Future collaborative projects onand communication, the American practitioners and allied professionals. other collection-care topics are alsoInstitute for Conservation of Artistic and In May 2012, AIC CCN was launched being developed. One such projectHistoric Works (AIC) recently estab- at the aptly named 40th annual AIC seeks to team AIC CCN with alliedlished its Collection Care Network meeting, Connecting to Conservation: professionals to develop a wiki-based(CCN). Created in early 2012, the Outreach and Advocacy in Albuquerque, publication on exhibition standards andCollection Care Network combines New Mexico (USA). As part of the guidelines. The entries will describethe preservation knowledge and skills “Outreach to Allies” session, attendees key steps in planning, developing, andof AIC members, and links them with were invited to share ideas and sugges- maintaining exhibitions from a preser-allied professionals. The AIC CCN is tions for future projects. The format vation point of view. The project willcommitted to advancing the critical included brief videos of various stake- build upon the work of former U.S.importance of preventive conservation holders in the preservation field National Park Service conservatoras the most effective means of promot- discussing the dilemmas they faced. Toby Rafael and museum consultanting the long-term preservation of cul- Among these videos, a lighting designertural property, and recognizes that both and an architect presented building-preservation and stewardship rest upon related issues. It is vital that this discus-the talents and skills of numerous sion continues beyond that nationalprofessionals and volunteers. AIC meeting. Please visit the AIC blog The AIC CCN serves people in every at www.conservators-converse.org/preservation profession: archaeologists, where you will soon have an oppor-architects, archives staff, art handlers, tunity to view the videos and addcollection care specialists, collection your voice.managers, conservators, curators, engi- One of the major goals of AIC CCNneers, entomologists, exhibit designers, is to pursue collaborative projects infacilities staff, historic house museum collection care. Recently, the Societystaff, library staff, mount makers, for the Preservation of Natural Historypreparators, preventive conservation Collections (SPNHC) and AIC CCNmaterials vendors, registrars, techni- announced that the Kress Foundationcians, and the many others who aid in has funded the development of apreservation. For more on our man- web-based resource entitled, STASH:date and purpose, please visit our Storage Techniques for Art, Science,website at www.conservation-us.org/ and History collections. Based on acollectioncare. former SPNHC publication, this ven- Since its first meeting at Winterthur, ture will present an expanded range The SPNHC book, STASH, which will beDelaware (USA), funded by a gener- of storage solutions, and integrate reproduced and expanded in a jointous grant from Tru Vue, AIC CCN has the many new materials which have partnership between AIC CCN and SPNHC.4 PAPYRUS SUMMER–FALL 2012
  7. 7. Felicity Devlin. Some modules havealready been posted on the AIC wiki, Board of the AIC Collection Care Networkwith more expected later this summer.This topic, along with many others, can Joelle Wickens, Chair 2012–2014 Robert Waller, Editor 2012–2015be found at www.conservation-wiki.com. Winterthur Museum, Protect Heritage Corp., Ottawa, ONThe direct link to Conservation Stan- Wilmington, DE rw@protectheritage.comdards & Guidelines for Exhibitions jwicke@winterthur.org Patricia Silence, Founding MemberUtilizing Museum Collections is Rebecca Fifield, Vice-Chair Colonial Williamsburg Foundation,www.conservation-wiki.com/ex. 2012–2014 Williamsburg, VA We invite you to collaborate in Metropolitan Museum of Art, psilence@cwf.orgdeveloping our next projects, and New York, NYto consider joining us at upcoming Julia Brennan, Founding Member Rebecca.fifield@metmuseum.org Private Practice, Washington, DCnational meetings. “Contemporary Wendy Claire Jessup, Secretary textilefixer@yahoo.comIssues in Conservation” is the theme 2012–2013for the May 29 to June 1, 2013 meeting, Rachael Perkins Arenstein, Private Practice, Arlington, VAplanned for Indianapolis. We welcome Founding Member prevcon@verizon.netsuggestions to help us shape a Private Practice, Scarsdale, NYworkshop to present at this meeting. Karen Pavelka, Treasurer 2012–2015 Rachael@amartconservation.com Looking ahead to our 2014 national University of Texas at Austin, Catharine Hawks,meeting in San Francisco, we envision Austin, TX pavelka@ischool.utexas.edu Founding Membera conference program focusing on National Museum of Natural History,preventive care, incorporating the ideas Gretchen Guidess, Communications Washington DCof many of our preservation allies. & Outreach 2012–2015 cahawks@aol.com We look forward to beginning a Historic New England, Haverhill, MAlong and enriching exchange between Gretchen.guidess@gmail.comour organizations. Delaware Delaware Maryland New Jersey w Pennsylvania Pennsylvania Virgina Virgina a New York York Ohio Massachusetts Massachusetts chusetts New Hampshire Co Connecticut onnecticut Construction Services Construction Services Energy Sustainability Energy & Sustainability Environmental Environmental Geotechnical Geotechnical Grant Writing Writing Laboratory Testing Laboratory Testing Test Landscape Architecture Landscape Architecture Materials Testing Inspection Materials Testing & Inspection c MEP Municipal Planning Site Design Structural Structural Survey Geomatics Survey & Geomatics Transportation Transportation Water/Wastewater Water/Wastewater Water/WW Winterthur Museum, Garden & Library, Winterthur, DE Providing Engineering Services Since 1966 Providing Engineering s www w w.pennoni.com www.pennoni.com om PAPYRUS SUMMER–FALL 2012 5
  8. 8. Who’s Afraid of Green Museums Fear and Loathing and HVAC By Elizabeth Wylie and Niall Cooper T his article is a follow-up to a session at the American a design brief? We have an 1880s building—won’t greening Association of Museum’s (AAM) Annual Conference cost too much? in Minneapolis in late April 2012. In a provocative Top-flight experts—all of whom either have been, or are forum, experts examined many of the questions that arise currently involved in some of the country’s most high-profile when museums undertake a capital project and want to museum building projects—offered valuable experienced- pursue environmentally sustainable practice in design and based perspectives. The primary outcome was that participants construction, as well as in ongoing operations. were empowered to ask questions, question assumptions, Capital construction projects are not a common occur- and push for excellence. The saying goes that the best rence within the career trajectories of most museum pro- buildings are the result of the best clients. This session was fessionals. The session aimed to empower museum leadership aimed at helping participants be better clients, getting the to ask and seek answers to tough questions. The challenge results that they want and that the museum field needs: of designing, building and operating environmentally sus- green buildings that perform and make a positive contribu- tainable museums (new, existing, and historical) is a multi- tion to the fabric of their communities. We wanted to help headed hydra that sows conflicts around budget and need, to make the connection between the design and construc- desire and reality, vision and capacity. The job of articulat- tion process and mission-fulfillment, underscoring long-term ing goals, matching budget and schedule, and keeping the thinking, and the power of green for branding and education, vision and intended outcome in sight is a tall order. Add as well as environmental responsibility. in new green technologies, differing metrics, and shifting The idea for this forum was born of a conversation we collections care standards, and you end up with a brew of had when we wanted to collaborate on an AAM session. challenges and opportunities. While brainstorming, we kept circling back to the same There are significant barriers to greening museums, many basic issue: Why aren’t museums greener? They are here for of which arise from confusion related to costs and technolo- the long haul, right? Their missions revolve around saving gies. The session’s format provoked a candid exploration collections for the “future”, right? This results in the expen- of barriers and points of conflict. Onsite questions, as well diture of untold resources on energy and water—resources as those pre-solicited from the field, stimulated a frank that are at risk, and which are harmful to the environment examination of the issues. Sample questions included: in their production/extraction. Other industries are already How important is LEED certification to achieving a green positioning themselves to adapt to climate change in museum? Given the current discussion about collections innovative, systems-based ways that can serve as models. care standards, how do you design for a situation in flux? Museums have started this process, but . . . Can you provide an example of when you have questioned We looked at the LEED program (www.usgbc.org), just one of many metrics, and where museums fall within the nearly 10,000 LEED certified projects. Certified is the lowestCOURTESY: BURO HAPPOLD COURTESY: BURO HAPPOLD This sample of 60+ LEED certified museums shows distribution LEED-certified museums over a ten-year period. across the rating levels, with Silver predominant. 6 PAPYRUS SUMMER–FALL 2012
  9. 9. The Experts Since we designed the session in an unconventional way, each expert provided an unconventional bio. Elizabeth Wylie LEED AP BD+C, Principal, Niall Cooper CEng MCISBE BEng (Hons) MSt, WYLIE projects Associate Principal, Buro Happold Elizabeth is a museum-oholic art historian who dreams Niall is an engineer, thinker and tinkerer with seventeen that museums will start adopting a longer strategic view, years of engineering, thinking and tinkering under his and position themselves to adapt to climate change with belt. He has engineered, thought about and tinkered with resource-efficient buildings and sites, for the ultimate in museums across the United States. Of all the buildings mission-fulfillment. he has engineered, thought about and tinkered with, museums are his favorite. Veronica Szalus, Director of Exhibits, National Nico Kienzl, DDES, LEED AP BD+C, ASHRAE HBDP, Children’s Museum Director, New York, Atelier Ten Veronica is a director of exhibits by day, and an installation Nico is a recovering architect, as well as a sustainability and artist by night. She focuses on green practices in both building physics expert who enjoys seeing art in natural fields, utilizing repurposed materials in many of her daylight and museums that connect to their surrounding installations, and fighting the good fight for incorporating environment. Too tightly controlled museum environments sustainable practices in exhibit design and daily operations give him “museum head” and reduce his attention span to at the Museum. about 30 minutes. Matthew Siegal, Chair, Conservation and Collections Meredith Mack, Executive Vice-President, Management, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston Rise Group LLC Meredith likes to make things work, and get things done. As Trained as a ceramist and a glassblower, Matthew manages a result, she often finds herself a project manager or admin- one of the largest art collections in North America. He istrator at fascinating places like museums, learning how longs for the museum community to be able to set aside to implement new systems and ideas like “green building”. the minutiae of daily operations, and embrace broader discourse—such as, how do we, as a society, determine the appropriate share of resources to commit to preservation Sarah Brophy, LEED AP EBOM, Principal, bMuse: of our material culture? As collection stewards, what do Sustainable Museums we owe the present generation, what do we owe future Sarah’s coolest green experiences as a volunteer include generations, and how do we use the finite lives of the planting grasses to rebuild habitat in the Chesapeake Bay, objects we collect? training as a marine-mammal-stranding team member (unfortunately we get the dead ones), and building trails on conservation land. She is dreaming of the day when James Alexander FAIA LEED AP, Principal, museums operate as ecosystems! Finegold Alexander Jim is an architect and reuse pioneer, who is delighted to Christopher Mekal, Principal, Mekal Consulting see early preservation efforts joined with environmental Chris looks forward to the day when green design is as sustainability. He sees how this merger can positively shape unquestioned in building programs as electricity. In the community through architecture, and wonders what new meantime, he keeps a sharp (and sometimes skeptical) eye “green” expression will mean for the built environment. on the bottom line.rating and Platinum is the highest (or most resource efficient). museums get to deep green; as a whole, however, the industrySilver is little more than what is required by code in some has been behind the curve in getting there. What are thestates. In a sample of 60+ LEED certified museums, Silver barriers? What are the solutions to help museums get tois the predominant target. fearless green? If you look at the rate of adoption, there was a precipitousfalling-off of deep green around the time stricter energyrequirements were rolled out in the 2009 version of LEED. The Project Kick-Off MeetingIt seems that museums are interested in—and indeed, For the session, we tried something new: a roleplayingare—going green; but they just aren’t reaching higher, exercise. Audience members were invited to become “flieswhich is something other sectors (colleges, universities and on the wall” during a project kick-off meeting. This wascorporations, for example) are already doing. Why aren’t followed by a randomized Q&A to keep it lively and edu-museums—trusted and valued institutions with smart staff cational. The approach was intended to explore a seriousand leadership—similarly positioning themselves to adapt? subject in a fun way, in order to cut through the fear andThe technology and professional expertise exists to help confusion, and show how to get where museums want to go. PAPYRUS SUMMER–FALL 2012 7
  10. 10. The scene is 45 minutes into an hour-long project kick- representation on the Building Committee—includingoff meeting. The team has already introduced itself, shared staff working in collections care, exhibits, advancement and,existing documentation, and reviewed schedule and budget, yes, facility management—was seen as important. Estab-and program goals are being discussed. We enter as the lishing a Green Team is optimal for developing, managingarchitect has just asked for specifics on what the Owner and monitoring museum-wide green practice going forward.broadly described as “Green” approaches. Making a commitment and embedding sustainable practice As the scenario played out and the audience asked into your organizational values can have a substantialquestions, the themes below emerged as areas that pose impact on how you design, operate, fund, and interpretpotential barriers to museums reaching for fearless green. your green building.How do I know what Green is? The LEED Certification process scares me. I feelWithout exception, every member of the panel agreed that overwhelmed? What can I do?early definition of sustainability goals is one of the single LEED is a recognized brand, and your audience and finan-most important factors affecting costs—and ultimately per - cial supporters likely know and appreciate that there is someformance—down the line. There was also agreement that verification of sustainability. The LEED process has beeneach museum needs to educate itself about sustainability, and streamlined over time: documentation is less onerous (newwhat it means for them as an institution—not just within online tools help, as has LEED’s adoption in the market-the context of a building project, but also going forward place), and professionals are more skilled. There is still somein terms of operations and education. Cross-disciplinary concern about what is sometimes called a LEED premium. The Roleplay Scenario Committee with leadership on the project. He has never been through a major capital project. Owner Emerald Museum and Gardens, a beloved local, private Head of Building Committee (Sarah) non-profit institution. Long-time Trustee and potential major donor. She is a self- made gazillionaire (invented a portable composter that Program has taken the marketplace by storm). She is Art museum with non-living, “encyclopedic” collections, knowledgeable about sustainability principles, but has plus living botanical garden and designed landscape. never been through a major capital project. Existing Building CFO (Chris) 20,000 sf Beaux Arts style, built in 1896; includes galleries, New to position (about six months). His last museum closed offices, and 5,000 sf of collection storage. one year after the new building opened. He is traumatized by capital-project cost overruns and lack of operational planning. Expansion He is watchful of the bottom line and a green skeptic. 15,000 sf, to include visitor services, café, gift shop, social space, special exhibition galleries, performance and Exhibition Designer (Veronica) education spaces. Head of the Museum’s Green Team and a sustainability Systems advocate. She has never been through a major capital Air-conditioning installed in 1950s; steam heating system project. with scattered upgrades over the years. Collections Manager (Matthew) Site Long-time staff person with conservation background. He has Five acres in tight urban setting in the Minneapolis/St. Paul been through minor storage and gallery-upgrade projects. metropolitan area. Facilities Manager Total SF With a military background and 30 years at the museum, 35,000 sf (renovation and new construction). he has been through small-scale, patchwork capital upgrades. He couldn’t make the meeting, as he had to attend to an Total Project Budget: $36.4 million emergency systems failure. Hard costs: $28 million (@$800/sf) • Soft costs: $8.4 million (@ 30%) Design Team (Jim, Niall and Nico) An architect, an HVAC engineer, and a sustainability consul- tant. All are experienced and possess award-winning talent The Players and technical expertise. Director Former Chief Curator, in position one year, following the Owner’s Project Manager (Meredith) 25-year tenure of the former Director. In Sweden visiting Savvy and experienced, she has been in the trenches both the family of the museum’s founders and positioning for as a client and as an OPM. She knows her way around all campaign ask, he has entrusted the Head of the Building aspects of capital projects.8 PAPYRUS SUMMER–FALL 2012
  11. 11. Studies show, however, that working with a truly integrated the budget by looking at the following three areas ofdesign team—and establishing and committing to green opportunity with increasing order-of-magnitude costs.goals early in the process—can minimize or even eliminate 1. Don’t forget the big picture and your long-term goals.any premium for sustainable design and construction. Look well beyond simple payback by examining larger There is also general recognition that some of the LEED investments that keep paying for the life of the buildingcriteria are not geared towards the special requirements of (ground-source heat pumps, etc.).museums. To begin to address this, members of PIC Green(AAM’s sustainability committee: www.facebook.com/ 2. Look at the interface and integration between thePICGreen) have formed an ad hoc committee on LEED historical building and new construction.in museums. Encouraged by the U.S. Green Building 3. Design a super-efficient new-build component throughCouncil (USGBC), the group has started reaching out to integrated systems and building-envelope strategies.LEED-certified museums to foster an evaluation mindset, tocomment on LEED 2012 (now v4.0), and to make recom- Benchmarking was also mentioned, as was IAMFA’smendations for LEED and ways to increase its effectiveness annual benchmarking report. Participants in the exercisefor museums. This work parallels similar conversations know how useful that kind of data can be over time, as itbetween PIC Green, AAM and Energy Star (the Environ- has resulted in significant savings in operating expenses.mental Protection Agency and Department of Energy’s Knowing how your museum currently sits in relation toenergy-efficiency program: www.energystar.gov/) to find its contemporaries is important. Tracking overall energyways in which the museum community can better use this usage (often referred to Energy Usage Intensity, or EUI)online tool. provides a useful benchmark for how well the building When asked if LEED is necessary for the Emerald Museum fabric and systems are working together as a whole.and Gardens expansion project, the roleplay engineer It’s not easy to obtain a true apples-to-apples comparisonresponded that “it’s not necessary, but is a good framework in EUI between museum buildings, given the wide varietyfor our approach as a design collective.” For the Emerald of spaces and program configurations. However, carefullyMuseum and Gardens, the idea is to “choose our own destiny measuring where and how energy is used (when comparedwith goals that make sense for what we are trying to do.” to similar building programs and geographical locations)From an engineering perspective, the team could work up can provide an extremely useful guide in forensic engineering PAPYRUS SUMMER–FALL 2012 9
  12. 12. efforts, which can improve both climate control margins a green skeptic, did concede that, as environmental respon-and overall energy usage. It can also be used to set realistic sibility becomes more important to museum audiences,EUI-improvement targets for renovations, as well as sensible they expect and are looking for evidence that resourcesgreen-stretch exercises for new building components. Such are being used wisely.assessments can be hugely beneficial prior to engaging insignificant capital development programs of expansion or Can we succeed in a fundraising campaign if weupgrade. These exercises can help tune the system design aren’t green?and prioritize upgrades, in order to obtain the “biggest The roleplay major donor said she would absolutely supportbang for your buck”. green approaches, saying she would work with the advance- The take-away is about looking holistically at your institu- ment office to target asks around the kinds of things thattion, your project, locale and culture. It is also about mea- motivate donors. She suggested that “some are only inter-surement and goal-setting. Return-on-Investment (ROI) was ested in green bling” (e.g., PV panels that can be easilycited as one decision-making tool that can help museums identified), while others understand that integrated greencome to terms with what is sometimes described as a “green approaches aren’t necessarily visible. Showing leadership,premium”. A truly integrated design team can work with she noted, has tremendous benefits, and can be leveragedenergy modelers and cost estimators to test scenarios for for more support. There is also the compelling argumentvarious building and systems schemes, and can lead the for donors that raising money for green-building purposescharge in discussing trade-offs. is in fact front-loading operating costs, since capital sup- port is traditionally easier to raise than operating funds.There is a dizzying array of products and technologies This kind of thinking is again looking holistically at anout there. How can I measure the cost-effectiveness of institution’s needs.installing these? Telling the green story before, during and after con-Again, measurement plays a role in understanding how the struction can educate and inform, while also generatingbuilding is being used and how to continually adapt and support both internally and externally. What are the sus-improve energy efficiency as space use shifts and changes. tainable design features inherent your existing historicalAn example is sub-metering. By monitoring every compo- building that you are restoring and/or reactivating in yournent of energy use in the building, facility managers can renovation project? How is the new construction designedgather and analyze data, and respond by changing the way to take advantage of passive green-design strategies (solarin which the building is operated, in order to maximize and wind orientation, envelope design, etc.)?opportunities to save even more energy. You can also get a lot of mileage out of things you don’t An important point was made here about operating a see, which can also capture the imagination. While thatgreen building. As the roleplay sustainability consultant geothermal heat-pump system might be kind of “techy”,put it, “We can design a great sustainable LEED Platinum it is interesting to think about the principles of the system.project, and still have a really crappy building if we don’t Standing-column wells that are 1,500 feet deep can berun it right.” Making sure the building is actually operated described as measuring the height of the Empire Stateand maintained over time, the way it was designed to be Building—underneath your building. You can furtheroperated and maintained, is critical. The panel reinforced explain that this means you can avoid giant cooling towersthe fact that engaging facility staff at the beginning of a on the roof, which might mar the building’s historical con-capital project can have a substantial impact on the outcome. text, which in turn feeds into a preservation story. Sharing Commissioning—a systematic assessment of building- the ideas behind sustainable-design strategies provides oppor-system design and post-occupancy performance—is required tunities to connect energy efficiency to mission-fulfillmentby the LEED program, and is a good idea whether LEED and the true cost of collections care.certification is pursued or not. Retro-commissioning is also Greening heritage buildings is not as daunting as oneuseful for existing building systems. In each case, commis- imagines when thinking about historic district commissionssioning ensures that the building is operating as efficiently and the Secretary of the Interior’s Guidelines. Often it isand safely as possible, and that it is operated and maintained simply about letting the historical building do what it wasby well-trained staff. This activity can also address some of designed to do, in terms of thermal mass, ventilation, andthe fear that springs up when the design team is specifying day lighting. Comparative studies of historical windows andhighly interactive design strategies and sophisticated insulation strategies support restoration and retrofitting forcontrol systems. preservation-oriented green building (www.english-heritage. org.uk/professional/research/buildings/energy-efficiency/How do I convince my museum to become energy thermal-performance-of-traditional-windows/).efficient? How do I make sure that the art is not Preservation of collections, and the compatibility of thissacrificed in the process? with sustainable design, has been demonstrated by leader-Internal buy-in was identified as a significant barrier, with ship among collecting institutions that have led the wayleadership questioning the costs, and staff reticent to adopt with deep-green buildings that conserve resources whilenew approaches that seemed at odds with commonly accepted also carrying out the mandate-based work of preserving thecollections care and exhibition practices. The roleplay CFO, objects, creatures, plants, and structures in their care. This10 PAPYRUS SUMMER–FALL 2012
  13. 13. has been, and will continue to be, facilitated by new thinking reliant on increasingly at-risk resources in order to fulfillabout collection-care practices. The conservation community their mandates to preserve collections forever. Acceptinghas ramped up the conversation and, indeed, has begun to that—and understanding that energy and water are critical,outline new risk-based parameters for conditioned spaces if we are to continue to enjoy and learn from our collec-for objects (www.iiconservation.org/sites/default/files/ tions—is the first step towards fearless green. And thatdialogues/plus-minus-en.pdf). requires leadership and a longer view. This has created discomfort for some who have rigidly The good news is that museums across the globe haveheld to the 50%RH/72°C formulation that many museum already shown leadership and a willingness to step onto thecurators and collection managers have had seared into their green road and follow it for the long term. The examplesbrains. Scientific research, education, and honest discus- set by these early adopters and continual adapters aresions within the field are shifting practice. This greater important in encouraging others, large and small, to follow.flexibility has also extended to day lighting. Increased day Professional training programs with embedded sustainability,lighting (direct, reflected, and diffused), in galleries as well as well as a general green zeitgeist, have also begun toas in museum public spaces, reduces energy use and cooling break down barriers. Finally, it is up to those who design,load, while also improving the visitor experience. build, and run museums—architects, engineers, directors, The visitor experience lies at the heart of these issues— curators, facility managers, et al—to demonstrate that theyafter all, what else is the point of saving all this stuff? As the are connecting the dots between mission-fulfillment androleplay collections manager put it, “As far as I am concerned, the health of the planet, and that they are taking action tothe objects we collect have no value without the human secure a bright future for both collections and people.component. They have no relationship to one another inour absence. The value they have is for our access and our Elizabeth Wylie LEED AP BD+C is Principal at WYLIE projects, ainteraction with them. If we were to be simply concerned consultancy providing strategy, marketing, development, andwith the preservation of our objects, we would never sustainability planning for the A/E/C industry and for museum, cultural and preservation organizations.display them, we would never loan them out, and theywould live forever in a dark storage vault.” Niall Cooper CEng MCIBSE BEng (Hons) MSt is an Associate Clearly, museums have already made the decision that is Principal at Buro Happold, an independent internationalnot what we want to do. Within that context, museums are practice of consulting engineers. ATKIN OLSHIN SCHADE ARCHITECTS The Anne d’Harnoncourt Sculpture Garden and Parking Facility 125 SOUTH NINTH STREET, SUITE 900 | PHILADELPHIA, PA 19107 | 215.925.7812 | blog.aosarchitects.com PAPYRUS SUMMER–FALL 2012 11
  14. 14. Benchmarking Options: New Energy Survey and Classic Comprehensive Survey By Stacey WittigT he IAMFA Benchmarking Steer- One way to really measure this is to translation for the survey and brochure, ing Committee just released a new participate in the IAMFA benchmark- which was distributed in the handouts energy survey to help facilities ing exercise and attend the annual to each attendee.reduce energy costs and consumption. benchmarking workshop. Recognizing In May, the IAMFA Energy SurveyThe IAMFA Energy Survey gives IAMFA that this is not practicable for all mem- was presented to the IAMFA Environ-members a second benchmarking bers, IAMFA has proposed a shorter mental Group Meeting held at theoption. The new survey was designed energy survey, which will at least record Manchester Museum. According toto meet the needs of smaller museums energy consumption and compare that participants, Jack Plumb providedand conservators who are looking for consumption with their peers,” said an excellent overview of IAMFA andbenchmarking data to support changes Jack Plumb, Facilities Manager, National benchmarking at the joint Conserva-in environmental conditions. Library of Scotland. tion and Estates/Facilities meeting. The IAMFA Energy Survey measures The IAMFA Benchmarking Steering The concept of benchmarking wasresults from the same survey questions Committee formed a subcommittee, new to some of the participants fromfound in the energy section of the conducted a pricing survey, and dis- smaller institutions.classic IAMFA Benchmarking Survey. cussed definitions and appropriate Not only will conservators and facilityThe essential difference between the survey questions. The subcommittee managers, new to IAMFA benchmark-two surveys is that the IAMFA Energy included Guy Larocque, Keith ing, get a tool to help meet the demandsSurvey does not collect cleaning, main- McClanahan, Randy Murphy, Jack of government mandates for measuringtenance, landscaping or security data. Plumb, David Redrup, David Sanders and reducing energy cost and con- Both IAMFA benchmarking surveys and Stacey Wittig. sumption, but longtime participantscollect more data on summer/winter With International Council of of the classic study will be able to addtemperature and humidity setpoints Museums (ICOM) conservators and sites for which measuring energy isthan in previous years. The Steering European Bizot Group museum direc- crucial, but a full survey is not warranted.Committee looked at the feasibility of tors becoming more focused on envi- For example, Plumb completes thean energy study over a year ago, after ronmental guidelines, the subcom- complete survey every year for his mainfacility managers in the U.K. brought mittee recommended questions about facility, but is looking to benchmarkthe need to the Committee’s attention. temperature and humidity setpoint other sites for the Energy Survey alone.Additionally, the Committee had been variances in different types of spaces. Participants of the Energy Surveyinterested for years in increasing par- Hence, setpoints are collected for will also be able to print out an IAMFAticipation from small institutions, which Exhibition Areas—Permanent Displays; Energy Label to display in their build-have neither the budget nor the man- Exhibition Areas—Temporary Exhibi- ings. Four years of data are neededpower for the complete survey. The tions; Conservation/Lab Areas; Collec- for a valid energy label. The IAMFAEnergy Survey, offered at a reduced tion Holding Areas, not including any Energy Survey is offered at one-thirdfee, appears to meet the needs of off-site storage; Collection Storage; the fee of the complete benchmarkingboth groups. and Library space, among seven other survey. Enrollment and results will be “I think it is absolutely vital that space categories. The data collected is available year round. Read more at:Facility Managers not only keep energy very specific to museums, libraries and www.facilityissues.com/Museums/consumption under very close scrutiny, archives, unlike other benchmarking E_IndexE.htmbut also benchmark that energy con- studies. Harry Wanless, retired fromsumption with their peers. With much the British Library, called it “comparing Stacey Wittig, Marketing Director at Facilitywork currently underway to make the apples to apples.” Issues, is an IAMFA member and sits on the IAMFA Benchmarking Steering Committee.environmental control of collection The subcommittee completed the She can be reached at Stacey.Wittig@spaces more sustainable, energy con- IAMFA Energy Survey in time for the FacilityIssues.com or 928-255-4943sumption should be reducing. So the annual European meeting in Paris last (GMT -7 hours).real question is: Is it reducing enough? March. Guy Larocque edited the French12 PAPYRUS SUMMER–FALL 2012
  15. 15. INSPIRED DESIGN, INNOVATIVE ENGINEERING CLIENTS INCLUDE: Baltimore Museum of Art Delaware Museum of Natural History Hagley Museum and Library Monticello Visitor Center National Gallery of Art Smithsonian Natural History Museum U.S. Holocaust Museum Virginia Museum of Fine Arts Walters Art Museum Winterthur Museum Walters Art MuseumIS A PROUD SPONSOR OF THE 22ND ANNUAL IAMFA CONFERENCE, MID -ATLANTIC, USA “Our IAMFA clients are knowledgeable and sophisticated about their design objectives for museum spaces. We are proud to support these unique environments with our specialized engineering expertise.” Robert Marino, PE, LEED AP President Mueller Associates For more information, visit www.muellerassoc.com 410.646.4500 Walters Art Museum
  16. 16. The Philadelphia Museum of ArtBy Rich ReinertT he Philadelphia Museum of Art is housed in a unique and spectacular landmark building that is as much a symbol of the greatness of the City of Philadelphiaas Independence Hall or the Liberty Bell. As intense asource of civic pride today as it was when it first openedover eighty years ago, the building has always stood asthe physical expression of Philadelphia’s most ambitiouscultural aspirations. When it first opened in 1928, only ten percent of thegalleries were fully completed and installed. The decadessince have been characterized by extraordinary and steadygrowth, and by the late 1970s acquisitions of great works ofart and donations of legendary private collections filled all The Philadelphia Museum of Art.available physical space. In 1981, the Museum completed anarchitectural master plan, intended to maximize the Museum’sfacilities for collections and programming. Among the most In 2002, the Philadelphia Museum of Art started bring-notable results of this undertaking were the reinstallation ing the objectives of the master plan to fruition. Variousof 90 galleries of European Art, completed in 1995, and the projects were implemented in phases:expansion of our art-handling facility, which will open soon. • Purchase of a 50,000-square-foot building, which was The master plan identified the limitations of the Museum’s converted to an art storage facility in 2004.physical plant. There was a very real need—exceeding theMuseum’s existing capacity—for significantly expanded • Purchase of the Reliance Standard Life Building, whichspace in which to display and store the collections adequately, was converted to the Perelman Building in 2007.house the Library, and provide work areas for staff. • Main Building Exterior Envelope Project in 2009. Simply put, there was no room left to grow, which is per-haps the most troubling reality for a Museum fighting to keep • Opening of the newly constructed Parking/Sculpturepace with the ever-expanding needs and interests of the Garden facility in 2009.public it serves. While annual attendance and demand for • Expansion of the main building art-handling facilityour internationally acclaimed programs continue to increase, involving 38,000 square feet of new structure and 24,000adequate space is not always available to accommodate more square feet of renovated space in 2012.visitors. The legacy of deferred maintenance was also apparent,as was the lack of sufficient parking for our visitors. The expanded art-handling facility, which will open in The creation of new physical space consistent with August 2012, will include a dedicated art-loading dock, athe integrity, beauty, and architectural significance of the dedicated loading dock for general materials, a collectionPhiladelphia Museum of Art was a priority in preparing the area for recyclable materials, various workshops, IT labs,institution for tomorrow’s visitors. The expanded facility will and a distance-learning broadcast studio.provide for the future growth of collections and programs, During the September 2012 IAMFA conference, wealong with state-of-the-art facilities for art storage and con- look forward to showing you around the new art-handlingservation, a technologically advanced library and learning facility.center, and adequate staff and back-office operations. Itwas estimated that 150,000 square feet would be required Rich Reinert is Facility Contracts Manager at the Philadelphiato meet all of the needs cited within the master plan. Museum of Art.Expansion of main building art-handling facility, opening in August 2012.14 PAPYRUS SUMMER–FALL 2012
  17. 17. Yo, Philly!By Rich ReinertY o! Prepare to learn a unique version of the English language. The key is to train your brain to fill in the blanks—so, when trying to speak Philly slang, putyour brain on half-speed and have at it. Here in Philly, we are so excited to be welcoming ourfriends from IAMFA that I thought we had better pass alongthis little translation guide. If you’re bringing one of thosetranslator dictionary dingies, you can put that jawn—er,book—away. My advice, if you get into a Philly slangdiscussion, is to watch for clues in body language. By the way, “jawn” pretty much means anything. It’s aword used in Philadelphia to describe any noun when theright word cannot be remembered within a reasonablespace of time. Let’s try a few words, just to get you acclimated.A-needing: AnythingBaffroom: BathroomConfer-bill: ComfortableDo-inn: Doing—greeting, as in “Hal-yu-do-inn”. Respond by saying “Hal-yu-do-inn” in a deeper tone.Fildelfia: PhiladelphiaFi-dollar: Five DollarsGa-head: Go aheadGet-in: GettingHaf: One-halfI-dear: IdeaIce-in: IcingJeeet?: Did you eat?Kant: CannotLy-berry: LibraryMayan: Mine. Not those ancient Indians.Nut-in: NothingOff-en: OftenPock-a-book: PurseRoun: AroundSow-filly: South PhiladelphiaTawk: TalkTo-mara: TomorrowUnderneef: UnderneathWooder: WaterWit: With (When ordering a cheese steak you may be asked wit or wit-out. That means Cheese Wiz. Or not).You-ze: The plural version of “you”. I hope this helps you-ze. If you need a-neding, ga-head n LANDSCAPE LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE / URBAN DESIGN / PLANNING REsend me an email. You-ze kant wander roun Filedelfia wit-out speaking the language. 215.440.0030 PHILADELPHIA / 215.440.0030 LOS 323.387.3598 LOS ANGELES / 323.387.3598 Of course I’m over-exaggerating. You’ll have a great info@theolinstudio.com info@theolinstudio.comtime here. www.theolinstudio.com www.theolinstudio.comRich Reinert is Facility Contracts Manager at the PhiladelphiaMuseum of Art. PAPYRUS SUMMER–FALL 2012 15
  18. 18. External Vertical Shade AutomationProject at the California Academyof SciencesBy Hershow Al-BaraziT he California Academy of Sciences has exterior shades installed on the east, south, and west façades of the Research, Collection, and Administration (RC&A)buildings. Yes, they do help provide some relief from thesun’s glare, but mostly they prevent heat-loading from thesun. Reducing the heat load = reducing the amount ofcooling needed = energy savings! Until recently, the shades were on a timer to extend/retract, depending on the time of day. The shades wouldbe lowered regardless of actual conditions. For example,some floors that require shade during the summer may notrequire shade during the winter, and the time of day thata floor requires shade changes throughout the year. Ourbeloved fog may have enveloped the building, and it may Fig. 1: Southeast weather station with solar sensors.be raining—regardless, the shades would be lowered onschedule. We needed to automate the shades to extend or retract angles (angle from the horizon, and the angle from eastbased on the sun’s actual intensity and position. We also to west).needed to integrate this automation into the Building The building’s orientation and the effect of the canopyManagement System (BMS). creates shade on the different floors. With this information, We mounted three solar irradiance sensors (facing east, we calculated a range of elevation angles for each floor,south and west) to measure the sun’s direction and angle and a range of azimuth angles for each wing.relative to the roof’s surface. Finally, we created an interface screen on the BMS to Using the sensor’s signals and vector analysis, the monitor the signals coming from each of the solar sensors,system calculates the approximate position of the sun and provide a visual indication of the shades that shouldthroughout the day, in terms of the elevation and azimuth be lowered.Fig. 2: Building orientation. Fig. 3: Canopy shade angles.16 PAPYRUS SUMMER–FALL 2012
  19. 19. This screen also allows the Operations Departmentto remotely extend or retract the shades for regularmaintenance. Employees are still given the choice (via the manualshade controls on each floor) to lower the shades whenthey are not required, but the system controls the need forthem to be down on sunny days. Academy employee Hershow Al-Barazi, under the watchfuleye of Ari Harding, Director of Building Systems, completedthe installation and programming.Hershow Al-Barazi was part of the CAS LEED O&M Certificationteam, and works primarily with the Air Handling and BuildingManagement system to help monitor and maintain ambientconditions in the administrative offices, live exhibits, andcollections. Figure 5: Rear of the Academy, with the shades up.Figure 4: BMS vertical shade interface. Past issues of Papyrus can be found on IAMFAs website www.IAMFA.org PAPYRUS SUMMER–FALL 2012 17
  20. 20. The National Geographic Societyis a LEED-EB Recertification StarBy Michael ArnyT he National Geographic Society is one of the world’s largest non- profit scientific and educationalorganizations. Founded in 1888 to“increase and diffuse geographicknowledge,” the Society works toinspire people to care about the planet.It reaches more than 400 millionpeople worldwide each month throughits official journal, National Geographicand other magazines, as well as theNational Geographic Channel, tele-vision documentaries, music, radio,films, books, DVDs, maps, exhibitions,live events, school publishing programs,interactive media, and merchandise.The National Geographic Society hasfunded more than 10,000 scientificresearch, conservation and explorationprojects, and supports an educationalprogram promoting geographic literacy. the rating system is all about maintain- History of LEED The National Geographic Society ing existing building performance, Recertificationalso works to provide a model for cor- while also having a continuous improve- The first cycle of recertification led toporate sustainability. The Society has ment program in place to improve Gold recertification being earned inbeen involved from the very beginning performance over time. 2009, under the LEED-EB v2.0 ratingin Leadership in Energy and Environ- system. The Society started the recerti-mental Design (LEED®), a rating fication cycle as soon as the USGBCsystem developed by the U.S. Green started to define the process and theBuilding Council (USGBC) to promote “The LEED program is a requirements for recertification.building sustainability. The National The second cycle of recertificationGeographic Society headquarters build- great tool for maintaining led to the earning of Gold recertificationing was, in fact, the first building to be the high performance of our in 2010, under the LEED-EB v2.0certified under the LEED for Existing headquarters building, and rating system.Buildings (LEED-EB) pilot program, The third cycle of recertification ledearning Silver certification in 2003. This is very consistent with the to the earning of Gold recertificationbuilding is a multi-purpose building values of the National in 2012, under the LEED-EB Operationmeasuring 746,237 square feet, with Geographic Society.” and Maintenance v2008 rating systemoffices, museum space, a gift shop, (LEED-EB O&M 2008).a cafeteria and meeting spaces. The —Robert Cline, Vice President, Over the nine years since the build-museum space is about three percent General Services, at the National ing’s initial certification, the Nationalof the building’s total floor area. Geographic Society Geographic Society has implemented Robert Cline, Vice President, General continuous sustainability improvementServices, at National Geographic, said, measures, guided by the LEED-EB rat-“The LEED program is a great tool for ing system. It uses Leonardo Academymaintaining the high performance The National Geographic Society as its LEED consultant for ongoingof our headquarters building, and is has been an early adopter of both recertification efforts. The Nationalvery consistent with the values of the initial LEED-EB certification and Geographic Society has now earnedNational Geographic Society.” ongoing recertification. The Society Gold certification twice under LEED- LEED-EB requires recertification has recertified its headquarters on a EB v2.0, and once under LEED-EBevery one to five years. This is because regular basis. O&M 2008.18 PAPYRUS SUMMER–FALL 2012
  21. 21. During the past nine years, the • Formation of a corporate Go Green Michael Arny, President ofNational Geographic Society has steering committee and five Leonardo Academy, said, “Theimplemented many green actions subcommittees. National Geographic Society hasto increase its sustainability taken a strong leadership position inperformance, including: demonstrating the importance of• Recycling 56.4% of all waste through “We take great pride in our ongoing recertification under the LEED-EB rating system as a tool for a comprehensive diversion program, LEED status. Being able to including cafeteria recycling and maintaining and increasing building say we are LEED-EB Gold is performance over time. All building- composting. a badge of honor. Yet, we owning organizations face the challenge• A comprehensive alternative trans- of institutionalizing continuous improve- portation and commuting program, have a target out there ment of building performance into their including flexible schedules, tele- called LEED Platinum organizations’ DNA, and LEED-EB commuting, bicycle racks and pre- that serves as a constant provides a robust framework for ferred parking for carpools and achieving this while maintaining the alternative-fuel vehicles. reminder that we can market value of the facility asset.”• Fixture water-use reduction 30% always do better.” Michael Arny has been a leader on energy, greater than LEED requirements environmental and sustainability issues for —Hans Wegner, Chief Sustainability (with a calculated savings of more than 30 years. He is the President Officer at the National 1,133,057 gallons per year). and founder of the charitable, non-profit Geographic Society organization Leonardo Academy, which• A multi-phase plan to upgrade advances sustainability and puts the com- building control systems over petitive market to work on improving several years. • Purchase of wind RECs covering the environment. Mr. Arny chaired the 100% of energy use. committee that developed LEED for• An overhaul of the major mechanical Existing Buildings. He can be reached systems that led to a 20% decrease • Participation in an energy demand- at www.leonardoacademy.org in energy use. response program. BUSINESS INSURANCE FOR CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS Tailored Solutions for Treasured Institutions Property | Liability | Auto | Workers Compensation | Umbrella Fine Arts | Directors & Officers | Employment Practices Fiduciary | and more Please visit us online at www.chubb.com/culturalinstitutions. The IAMFA LinkedIn Group now has 360 members from 31 countries. Join the Group and see what everyone is talking about, Think EXPERIENCE. Think Chubb. and PLEASE...join in the discussions; wed like to hear what you have to say. Chubb refers to the insurers of the Chubb Group of Insurance Companies. Actual coverage is subject to the language of the policies as issued. Chubb, Box 1615, Warren, NJ 07061-1615. © 2012 Chubb & Son, a division of Federal Insurance Company. linkedin.com PAPYRUS SUMMER–FALL 2012 19

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