Egan9752 arin6903 week7presentation
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Egan9752 arin6903 week7presentation

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Manovich talks about the screen and the user, the main points were how the screen still maintains relevance today. The screen offers the user to opportunity to coexist in two different spaces ...

Manovich talks about the screen and the user, the main points were how the screen still maintains relevance today. The screen offers the user to opportunity to coexist in two different spaces simultaneously. While the screen was always a metaphor for windows - Manovich discusses how virtual reality has not quite reached full conception, and what we are more closer to is augmented reality instead. One of the interesting things to consider is the fact that the environment (sounds, music and so on) that contribute to the experience of the screen is not discussed.

Images utilised and attributed:
Image:
Window Pane
Purpleplatapus 714
http://browse.deviantart.com/?qh=§ion=&global=1&q=window+pane#/d21la39

Windows Aero Messenger
CrystalPhoenixStudio
http://browse.deviantart.com/?qh=§ion=&global=1&q=Windows+Aero+Messenger#/d1077qy

A frame is not a limit
Hybrid-creation

http://hybrid-creation.deviantart.com/art/A-frame-is-not-a-limit-144030850?q=boost%3Apopular+picture+frame&qo=24

Image http://www.digitaltigers.com/images/zv-arenaelite_700x387.jpg

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  • Image: Window Pane Purpleplatapus 714 http://browse.deviantart.com/?qh=&section=&global=1&q=window+pane#/d21la39 Windows Aero Messenger CrystalPhoenixStudio http://browse.deviantart.com/?qh=&section=&global=1&q=Windows+Aero+Messenger#/d1077qy
  • Youtube link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3uQwjgZ0kQM
  • At the end of the movie Ferris Bueller’s day off , he talks to the audience.
  • A frame is not a limit Hybrid-creation http://hybrid-creation.deviantart.com/art/A-frame-is-not-a-limit-144030850?q=boost%3Apopular+picture+frame&qo=24
  • Image TV Undefined144 http://browse.deviantart.com/?q=TV&order=9&offset=24#/d2flys
  • Image http://www.digitaltigers.com/images/zv-arenaelite_700x387.jpg
  • iPhones/ iPad/ Iron Man and augmented reality.
  • Interesting how originally the window was open to possibilities and other worlds, and yet, we are told in order to enter those worlds, our bodies become imprisoned – held captive by the immobile gaze. Movable prisons.
  • Interesting how originally the window was open to possibilities and other worlds, and yet, we are told in order to enter those worlds, our bodies become imprisoned – held captive by the immobile gaze. Movable prisons.
  • The future?
  • players do not see the interface anymore because they feel present in the world beyond the screen.

Egan9752 arin6903 week7presentation Egan9752 arin6903 week7presentation Presentation Transcript

  • The screen and the user MANOVICH, L. 2001. The screen and the user. The Language of New Media. London: MIT Press. Week 7 Elle Gan 310089670 [email_address]
  • The Window Metaphor
    • A computer monitor (p.94)
      • When connected to a network becomes a window
      • Can be transformed and becomes capable of engaging us in dialogue.
  • The Screen
    • Screen Definition (p. 94 -95)
      • ... a flat rectangular surface that the user experiences the illusion of navigating through virtual spaces , of being physically present somewhere else
      • The existence of another virtual space , another three-dimensional world enclosed by a frame and situated inside our normal space .
      • The frame separates two absolutely different spaces that somehow coexist .
    Virtual Space
  • The Screen
    • A screen’s image (p.96)
      • Strives for complete illusion and visual plenitude
      • Viewers are asked to suspend disbelief , and to identify with the image.
      • Creates an illusion when the screen is filled, if the illusion is disrupted then it makes us conscious of what exists outside of the representation (For example, Breaking the Fourth wall ).
    • Are there any other attributes that would describe a screen?
  • Screen Types
    • Classic (p.95)
      • Flat rectangular
      • Intended for frontal viewing, exists in normal space and acts as a window into another space .
      • Other space –“ space of representation ” has a different scale from the scale of our normal space.
  • Screen Types
    • Dynamic (p.95)
      • Similar properties of classical screen, but can display an image changing over time .
      • For example, Television, cinema, and so on –brings about a relationship between the image and the spectator “viewing regime.”
  • Screen Types
    • Real Time - Computer Screen (p. 96-97)
      • Landscape mode, and portrait mode
      • A number of co-existing windows – no single window dominates the viewer’s attention .
      • The viewer no longer concentrates on one image.
      • Originally created for military/surveillance, and much later in the public.
  • History of Modern Surveillance
    • WWII (p. 98-100)
      • Radar emerging – screens would change in real time
    • Semi-Automatic Ground Environment ( SAGE) (p.100-102)
      • contained all the main elements of the modern human-computer interface. For example, Sketchpad – interactive touch screen.
      • New paradigm emerged – the simulation of an interactive three-dimensional environment without a screen.
      • Sound familiar?
  • History of Modern Surveillance
    • IBM Sage Computer Ad, 1960 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iCCL4INQcFo
    • History of Radar http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VTBdtZ5C16E
    • 1957 SAGE Early Warning Defence Radar Computer System by IBM http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tf1h6aGE5Zo
  • The Screen and the Body
    • Examining the relationship (p.103 -104)
      • Roland Barthes, the screen becomes an all-encompassing concept that covers the functioning of even non-visual representation (literature).
      • Barthes concept encompasses all the types of representational apparatuses : painting, film, television, radar, and computer display.
    • Reality is cut by the screen
      • This allows simultaneously double viewing of the subject , who exists in two spaces – the familiar physical space of the body, and the virtual space of an image within the screen.
  • The Screen and the Body
    • Western Tradition (p.104-105)
      • The body is fixed in space order to see the image.
      • Described as imprisonment of the body - as it occurs both on the conceptual and literal levels.
    • Gaze vs. Glance
      • Norman Bryson – perspective followed by logic of the Gaze rather than the Glance , thus producing a visual take that was eternalized, reduced to one ‘point of view’ and disembodied.
      • Originally the window was open to possibilities and other worlds, and yet, we are told in order to enter those worlds, our bodies become imprisoned – held captive by the immobile gaze. Movable prisons.
  • The Screen and the Body
    • Mobility (p.107 - 108)
      • Anne Friedberg - “ mobilized virtual gaze. ”
      • The body of the spectator remains in their seat while their eye is coupled with a mobile camera. In actuality the camera does not, move, it remains stationary, coinciding with the spectator’s eyes .
    • Immobility
      • Cost of virtual mobility rendered the spectator immobile .
      • The virtual space as a whole that changes its positions with each shot. Virtual space is rotated, scaled, and zoomed always to give the spectator the best viewpoint.
  • Representation vs. Simulation
    • Virtual Reality (VR) (p. 110-113)
      • Two spaces (Physcial, and Virtual) have different scales .
      • VR paradox - movement is now tethered by a machine, the viewer must move in order to proceed.
      • Virtual world is synchronised with the physical one.
    • Simulation
      • Blending of spaces vs. separation of them.
      • Depicted a fake space continuous with and extended from the normal space.
  • Representation vs. Simulation
    • VR continues the tradition of simulation (p. 113).
      • However, there is no connection between the two spaces ... or conversely, the two completely coincide.
        • In either case, the actual physical reality is disregarded, dismissed, abandoned.
      • The central viewing area is conceived as a continuation of fake space, rather than vice versa, as before – and this why it is usually empty (For example, Walking in Virtual Reality ).
  • The Screen of Today
    • The Screen Era (p. 114- 115)
      • We clearly live in the society of the screen.
      • The Screen threatens to take over our offices and homes.
      • Dynamic, real-time, and interactive, a screen is still a screen .
      • We still have not left the era of the screen.
        • What could be next on the horizon?
  • Further notions on the screen
    • Video game spaces
      • Player’s have gone beyond an interface and feel their presence in a world “beyond the screen Nitsche (2008: p.203) . ”
    • What do I think ?
      • Anything rectangular always represented a metaphor for a doorway as a way of escaping to another dimension in human culture through narrative.
        • For example, Alice in Wonderland (Looking Glass), Coraline (Small doorway), Chronicles of Narnia (The Wardrobe)
      • The screen represents possibilities and paradox, as much as we try to “escape” screens connect our lives together
        • For example, Smartphone applications, Windows (Operating System)
  • References
    • MANOVICH, L. 2001. The screen and the user. The Language of New Media. London: MIT Press.
    • NITSCHE, M. 2008. Video Game Spaces, Cambridge, Massachusetts, The MIT Press.